Sunday, December 2, 2012

News Review - 12.2.12 - MNSI

News Review - 12.2.12

via cia - Google Blog Search by Joe on 11/28/12
In what they say is a first-ever event, today the CIA is holding a recruitment event in association with the Miami-Dade Gay & Lesbian Chamber of Commerce. Steve Rothaus has the story at the Miami Herald: “This is the first ...

via cia - Google News on 11/29/12

ABC News





Petraeus Sex Scandal: Former CIA Chief Tells Friend He 'Screwed Up Royally'
ABC News
One of David Petraeus' closest friends says the former CIA director admitted that he "screwed up royally" by having an affair with his biographer Paula Broadwell. Retired Brigadier Gen. James Shelton has been friends with Petraeus for more than three ...
Former CIA Director Petraeus Blames His MistressNewsmax.com
CIA headed in the wrong general directionSan Angelo Standard Times
General Petraeus Should Not Have ResignedHarvard Crimson
Christian Post -NBCNews.com (blog) -Huffington Post
all 91 news articles »

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via cia - Google News on 11/29/12

Foreign Policy (blog)





The Art of the Deal
Foreign Policy (blog)
With the abrupt departure of Director David Petraeus, the revolving door on the CIA's seventh floor continues to spin: The average tenure of the agency's last five leaders has been less than 20 months. COMMENTS (0) SHARE: Twitter. Reddit. Bookmark and ...
The Fog of IntelligenceNewsmax.com

all 3 news articles »

 

The Art of the Deal

Why the CIA needs a diplomat, not a spy, to lead it. - Print Version

BY ANDY JOHNSON |NOVEMBER 29, 2012


With the abrupt departure of Director David Petraeus, the revolving door on the CIA's seventh floor continues to spin: The average tenure of the agency's last five leaders has been less than 20 months.

The timing of this leadership upheaval could not have come at a worse time for the agency. The CIA once ruled the operational and analytic fiefdoms of the U.S. Intelligence Community with near-monopolistic control. But bureaucratic reorganization and the expansion of military intelligence during the Iraq and Afghanistan wars brought an end to a half-century of preeminence. The steady diminution of the CIA's influence over the past decade echoes the travails of Microsoft -- the spy agency is weakened, beset by competitors, and facing an uncertain future.
The paradox of this post-9/11 reality is that the CIA is now more mission-focused than at any time since the height of the Cold War. Its aggressive, collaborative prosecution of terrorist networks has been wildly successful and saved American lives here and abroad. This was by design, aided in large part by reform efforts to eliminate intelligence agency stovepipes, force information sharing, and enhance paramilitary capabilities. The results have borne out the wisdom of these and other steps to remake the Intelligence Community.
And yet, the CIA's traditional primacy has taken a number of body blows. The creation of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence and its "community" superstructure in 2004 abolished the CIA director's authority beyond Langley and foreign stations. Increased military intelligence collection and operations overseas sometimes lacked coordination and caused confusion in the field as to who was in charge. The proliferation of new intelligence and analysis offices, such as the one within the Department of Homeland Security, created rival (and welcome, some would contend) judgments and estimates. Even inside the White House, the president has appointed his own trusted homeland security and counterterrorism deputy, John Brennan, to ride point on pressing security threats. With remarkable swiftness, the CIA director was crowded off of his privileged perch as the president's chief intelligence advisor.
Those reportedly on the shortlist of qualified candidates to replace Petraeus possess the intelligence expertise traditionally sought to run the agency. For the next CIA head to excel, however, more than a mastery of our nation's intelligence apparatus is required. Bureaucratic tug-of-wars and overseas challenges have rewritten the chief spymaster's job description. The next director must have the skills of a hard-nosed negotiator and the acumen of a Washington insider if the agency is to reclaim lost ground. Being an experienced clandestine operative, veteran intelligence manager, or seasoned congressional overseer is no longer sufficient. The CIA needs a power broker, because only a director with clout, someone who is well-versed in the art of the deal, will be able to win the fights brewing within the administration's national security team.
In the intelligence universe, the "battlefield" is always evolving and the lines of engagement are in constant flux, particularly when it comes to transnational threats like terrorism. Clear parameters of authority and operational responsibility are essential in order to locate, track, monitor, and -- if need be -- arrest or attack the enemy. Bringing this cohesion to the Intelligence Community has been a necessary and at times painful process -- and one that still continues today.
The Defense Department moved aggressively after 9/11 to ramp up counterterrorism collection, and it expanded its footprint further after the 2003 Iraq invasion. A more robust, forward-leaning military counterterrorism strategy was needed, but efforts were not always coordinated with the CIA and foreign missions and information were not always corroborated and vetted before making it into the national policy chain. Most notably, the insertion into senior policymaker briefings of faulty Defense Department analysis claiming an operational relationship between Saddam Hussein and al Qaeda promoted a linkage that the Intelligence Community did not believe existed, and buttressed calls for military action. Notwithstanding efforts to resolve such issues, reducing the tension between defense and intelligence collection efforts overseas remains unfinished business for the incoming director.
The operational command of missile-equipped drones is another flashpoint between the intelligence and defense communities. Who exactly controls these assets -- the lethal point of the intelligence spear, if you will -- both inside and outside military areas of operations? There have been vocal critics of the "militarization" of the CIA in recent years, but similar concerns exist over the military's mission creep into the civilian agency's traditional clandestine portfolio.
And what of the growing, long-term threat of cyber attack against the homeland? The Pentagon created U.S. Cyber Command in 2009 to protect military networks, and similar efforts are underway at the Department of Homeland Security to secure civilian networks. With the National Security Agency carrying out both Defense Department combat support and Intelligence Community duties, the question remains as to how the responsibilities for cyber operations beyond America's borders are to be distributed among the key players. If the post-9/11 axiom that the best defense is a good offense remains valid, then the outcome of this ongoing policy debate will be consequential for both the CIA's prerogatives and the protection of the nation's cyber infrastructure.
The negotiation challenges facing the next director will not all be inside the Beltway. Strong foreign partners have and will continue to be the backbone of overseas intelligence operations. The new head of the CIA will be asking increasingly skittish -- and, in some cases, suspect-- foreign services to do more in moving against terrorist networks and hunting down operatives, as well as to cooperate on other shared security priorities. Hammering out these sensitive particulars requires the deft hand of a savvy and respected broker.
CIA director is arguably the most thankless job in Washington. The agency workforce is highly-motivated, and their individual and collective efforts to protect the United States are shrouded in secrecy -- until, that is, there is a leaked failure. And the agency continues to pay a price in the public's mind for past missteps, both real and imagined. The operational tempo will remain high at Langley and in the field for the foreseeable future. CIA employees will be looking for a leader who will not only support the agenda of the Intelligence Community as a whole and work collaboratively with his or her defense counterparts, but also be an effective advocate for the CIA at the interagency negotiation table -- someone who can help restore the agency's centrality in carrying out the nation's most sensitive operations.


BARBARA SAX/AFP/Getty Images
 
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via cia - Google News on 11/29/12

RT





CIA Sued for One Very Bad Trip
Slate Magazine (blog)
It's no secret the CIA experimented with LSD as a form of behavioral engineering and mind control in the early 1950s. Now, a new lawsuit alleges the agency might have drugged one of its own scientists with the psychedelic agent before assassinating him ...
Lawsuit in death of Detrick scientist alleges CIA misdeeds 59 years agoGazette.Net: Maryland Community News Online
CIA Sued Over Alledged 1953 Murder of Military ScientistBusinessweek
Family sues CIA over scientist's mysterious deathPolitico
Huffington Post -RT
all 236 news articles »

via cia - Google News on 11/28/12

Examiner.com





Lawsuit holds CIA accountable for death of U.S. bio-weapons scientist
Examiner.com
A lawsuit filed in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia on Wednesday seeks to hold the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) accountable for its involvement in the death of Frank Olson, a bio-weapons scientist and covert CIA ...



via Videos matching: cia by slatester on 11/29/12
It's no secret the CIA experimented with LSD as a form of behavioral engineering and mind control in the early 1950s. Now, a new lawsuit alleges the agency might have drugged one of its own scientists with the psychedelic agent before assassinating him and engaging in a decades-long cover-up. The lawsuit was filed Wednesday by the sons of Frank Olson, a biological warfare expert who worked developing bioweapons for the agency in its early years. According to the suit, Olson became disturbed with CIA practices after he witnessed "extreme interrogations" in which he saw his own chemical agents used for murder. Shortly afterward, the suit alleges he was given a bottle of LSD-laced Cointreau by agency colleagues and suffered a nervous breakdown. The CIA claimed that after being sent for psychiatric evaluation in Manhattan, Olson committed suicide by leaping from his hotel window. But after a 1993 forensic examinations revealed signs of foul play, his family now believes he was murdered. Though the CIA has revealed thousands of pages of documents detailing their LSD experiments, and even admitted to drugging Olson, the agency continues to deny any involvement in his death or cover-up afterward.
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via cia - Google News on 11/29/12

NBCNews.com





CIA Accused of Coverup in Military Scientist's 1953 Fatal Fall
Concord Monitor
CIA employees murdered military scientist Frank Olson in 1953 after he raised concerns about testing chemical and biological weapons on human subjects without their consent, according to a lawsuit brought by his two sons. Eric and Nils Olson, in a ...
Family sues U.S., says CIA murdered scientist in 1953OregonLive.com
CIA Sued for One Very Bad TripSlate Magazine (blog)
Lawsuit in death of Detrick scientist alleges CIA misdeeds 59 years agoGazette.Net: Maryland Community News Online
Politico
all 242 news articles »

via cia - Google News on 11/29/12

News Tribe





US wants doctor who helped CIA trace Osama released and safe
Times of India
... Shakil Afridi, who helped CIA trace Osama bin Laden in Pakistan, to be "released and safe". A Pakistani doctor, Dr Afridi is accused of helping the CIA in tracing Osama bin Laden, the al-Qaida terrorist, and has been sentenced to 33 years of ...
Pakistani officials have denied reports that Afridi - the detained Pakistani ...Deutsche Welle
Doc who helped CIA hunt down Osama on hunger strikeGreaterKashmir.com
Shakil Afridi hunger strike: US demands safety, release of CIA spyNews Tribe
Daily Bhaskar
all 73 news articles »

via cia - Google News on 11/30/12

The Week Magazine





Why the CIA should get out of the killing business. Again.
The Week Magazine
ith the new vacancy on the fifth floor at Langley, a robust debate has resumed over whether the Central Intelligence Agency should continue trending toward paramilitary activity and targeted killings, or return to its traditional focus on sending spies ...



CIA headed in the wrong general direction - by Roy A. Harrell Jr.

CIA headed in the wrong general direction

Agency should not be paramilitary force



Former  CIA Director David Petraeus, who resigned this month following an extramarital affair, may not even be missed in Langley, assuming that no classified information has been disseminated to America's enemies.
Associated Press file
Photo by JEAN-MARC BOUJU, AP2004
Former CIA Director David Petraeus, who resigned this month following an extramarital affair, may not even be missed in Langley, assuming that no classified information has been disseminated to America's enemies. Associated Press file

More than 50 years ago, my resignation from the Central Intelligence Agency was effectuated. The Company, as it had always been known, had become a bit too militarized and was not what some of its founders such as Allan Dulles envisioned.
Intelligence was collected but rarely analyzed coherently so as to contribute to enlightened policies. Much of what was collected by the Company lay unused, some of us feeling it is too expensive to collect this data, not to mention the risk involved.
Moreover the trend was in the direction of militarization, a task that could be more expertly done by the Department of Defense.
I chose, as an interim measure, to throw my hat toward a smaller but more focused intelligence-gathering group at the Department of State. These are decisions I never regretted and throughout my subsequent career I maintained a discrete but respectful distance from Company personnel.
There had been other military personnel at the CIA helm, including Gen. Bedell Smith, but without the lurid detail emerging from the FBI investigation that led to the fall of Director David Petraeus. There will be attempts to attach significance to the delay in informing President Barack Obama of the chief spy's plight up the Potomac River and elsewhere, but those behind such efforts probably will be disappointed.
Lots of conspiracy theorists in today's media try to establish a connection between the resignation of one of our most famous soldiers on Nov. 9 over an extramarital affair with his biographer, Paula Broadwell, and various congressional investigations into the deaths in Benghazi in September of Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans.
But while the CIA probably overrelied on the security supposed provided by Libyan militias, there seemingly is no evidence that rescue attempts were deliberately delayed by those in charge at CIA in Langley, Va., or the White House.
The shock and dismay caused by the departure of Petraeus might have been an unwelcome distraction from an election campaign that was going just as the president wished, but let us not forget that Petraeus was a real hero to the GOP. In some media accounts, he had even been seen as a possible vice presidential pick before his appointment as CIA director more than 18 months ago.
Today there is probably a lot of interest in what sort of legacy an extraordinary career has left. The stature of the general as the epitome of the modern soldier-statesman-scholar was rooted in both real achievement and to me represents a myth of his own making and possibly the creation of lots of others.
Back home after two tours in Iraq, he used the time well to digest a lot of lessons he had learned to rewrite the army's field manual on counterinsurgency. He had the notion that the operational priority should be providing security for ordinary people in Iraq, thence creating the conditions for a government under attack by an insurgency to earn legitimacy through the mere provision of goods and services hither and yon.
By late 2006, when faced with what looked like a descent into a bloody civil war in Iraq, many were ready to throw in the towel. However, former President George W. Bush, desperate to find a less disgusting denouement to this war, saw Petraeus, supported by a troop "surge," as some kind of lifeline for his reputation.
There are admittedly lots of fuzzy areas, notably how much of the success was due to Petraeus and how much to the rejection by Sunni tribal leaders of al-Qaida's ethnic cleansing that had begun before Petraeus' return in 2007. That is still being discussed, with no conclusions reached.
Petraeus may have been lucky, and he did seem to bend history around a narrative of a disaster that was certainly more or less true in troop numbers as some kind of lifeline for the president.
A mere two years ago, Gen. Stanley McChrystal, Petraeus' trusted deputy, was sacked in Afghanistan when he made some harsh remarks about the Obama administration. Obama sent for Petraeus to work his magic in Afghanistan and a time-specific surge was put in place.
The chances of a similar success in Kabul were not all that bright, but the objective was to kill as many Taliban as possible and that was dazzling, to say the least.
Petraeus handed over control to Gen. John Allen. But Allen was in a bizarre way brought into the Petraeus scandal, and now his confirmation hearing as the new supreme commander in Europe has now been put on hold.
It is amazing that both Petraeus and Allen had so much time to devote to personal emails.
After becoming director of the CIA, Petraeus became an enthusiastic advocate for a paramilitary strategy for the CIA, a process that had been in the works for well over a decade, much to the dismay of many people who had been affiliated in various capacities with the CIA.
Before news of his extramarital affair broke, Petraeus had asked for more aircraft to be added to the agency's fleet, which already has more than 45 drones. There is no accountability as far as can be determined regarding this new role. The CIA itself is now involved in killing terrorist suspects.
One would hope that whoever becomes the director will have the good sense to hand over the main responsibility for drone attacks to the Pentagon, thus re-emphasizing that agency's traditional and mandated role. There is certainly no role for the CIA in these endeavors.
Speaking as a former CIA employee, I would think Petraeus may not even be missed in Langley; his home life is beyond the scope of the current problem, assuming that no classified information has been disseminated to America's enemies.
Like lots of traditionalists who worked at the CIA, this writer would like and even yearn for a return to the CIA-mandated role rather than some paramilitary unit. Petraeus should not be missed in this role of director of Central Intelligence.
Roy A. Harrell Jr. of Ozona is a retired foreign service officer.
© 2012 San Angelo Standard Times. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


via cia - Google News on 11/29/12

ABC News

Petraeus Sex Scandal: Former CIA Chief Tells Friend He 'Screwed Up Royally'
ABC News
One of David Petraeus' closest friends says the former CIA director admitted that he "screwed up royally" by having an affair with his biographer Paula Broadwell. Retired Brigadier Gen. James Shelton has been friends with Petraeus for more than three ...
Former CIA Director Petraeus Blames His MistressNewsmax.com
CIA headed in the wrong general directionSan Angelo Standard Times
General Petraeus Should Not Have ResignedHarvard Crimson
Christian Post -NBCNews.com (blog) -Huffington Post
all 91 news articles »

CIA is holding a recruitment event in association with the Miami-Dade Gay & Lesbian Chamber of Commerce

Another First: CIA Recruits Gay Spies


In what they say is a first-ever event, today the CIA is holding a recruitment event in association with the Miami-Dade Gay & Lesbian Chamber of Commerce. Steve Rothaus has the story at the Miami Herald:
“This is the first one ever,” said Michael Barber, the CIA’s LGBT Community Outreach and Liaison program manager. “This is the first of what I hope will be similarly networking events with LGBT chambers across the nation.” Barber — “a straight ally” — along with gay CIA employees Engineering Development Chief Bill French and Technical Information Officer Tracey Ballard, will speak to prospective employees about the benefits of joining the agency. “I look at my job as informing and educating about the CIA’s mission. And in the LGBT community, debunking those myths,” Barber said, referring to the widely held assumption that gay people are unwelcome. In 1989, a federal appeals court found evidence that the CIA routinely denied security clearances to gay people. “There was a history of discrimination against LGBT persons in the federal government,” Ballard said. “The process was extremely difficult for LGBT people to get security clearance prior to 1995."
The CIA already has an LGBT employees group with over 200 members.
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