Friday, April 10, 2015

The CIA gets a makeover

The CIA gets a makeover

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Director of the Central Intelligence Agency John Brennan speaks at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York last month. (Brendan Mcdermid/Reuters)
CIA Director John Brennan has just done what many of his predecessors at the agency surely dreamed of doing over the past few decades, which is to put the existing organizational chart in a shredder and redo it.
Brennan’s makeover order came in a March 6 memo to the workforce titled “Our Agency’s Blueprint for the Future.” It was written in anodyne, business-school language, and it hasn’t received much media coverage. But the message was blunt: The CIA’s current management structure is too loose and archaic for a world that’s on fire.
David Ignatius writes a twice-a-week foreign affairs column and contributes to the PostPartisan blog.
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“What’s broken that needs to be fixed?” Brennan mused in a conversation with reporters last month. “I have a feeling that Kodak executives in the 1990s were asking themselves the same question, and, sure enough, things just passed them by.”
Brennan is basically right. The CIA’s culture is broken. The hero of my most recent novel, “The Director,” muses on his first day on the job that maybe the famous campus in Langley should be blown up and turned into a theme park. He settles for removing the statue of the CIA’s founding father, William “Wild Bill” Donovan, from the lobby.
Parts of Brennan’s plan worry me, though. In trying to create a more responsive organization with better oversight, he may add layers of bureaucracy. And his plan to merge analysts and operators in 10 “mission centers” makes sense — but it could undermine the independence that encourages analysts to question whether operations in, say, Afghanistan are really working.
There’s a “subtle pressure” for analysts to trim criticism of operators when they’re sitting next to them, explains Michael Morell, a former deputy director and author of a forthcoming memoir titled “The Great War of Our Time.”
CIA employees are said to be nervous. “There’s a lot of wait-and-see going on,” said another former deputy director. A workforce that is notoriously adept at sabotaging change may hope to wait this one out — and pray that when Brennan’s successor arrives in fewer than two years, he or she will undo the plan.
The reorganization has three basic goals, each of which is endorsed by former directors and deputies I queried. They said they had experimented with similar ideas while in office but hadn’t taken them as far as Brennan proposes.
His first big move is to create mission centers that will supplant the existing geographically based divisions. The model is the Counterterrorism Center, which showed that combining different disciplines under one roof produced both better targeted operations and sharper analyses. Brennan has appointed 10 assistant directors who will run these centers, and he hopes to have them operating by October.
The “mother ships” for officers will still be the Directorate of Operations and Directorate of Analysis, respectively. But as Brennan complained last month, those directorates have been too “stovepiped.” That’s putting it mildly. Over the decades, the directorates developed organizational cultures that were turf-conscious and change-resistant.
What worries me is that the mission centers, as a new bureaucracy, will require an additional layer of management. Brennan proposes a stronger secretariat and executive director to monitor day-to-day activities. It sounds reasonable, but a secret bureaucracy tends to grow in the dark like mushrooms. Beware a seventh-floor management team that becomes so top-heavy the building underneath buckles.
Brennan’s second major change is a new Directorate of Digital Innovation. This sounds like technobabble, but it’s a good idea. Essentially, it takes the existing Information Operations Center, widely judged to be a success, and puts it on steroids. Every aspect of intelligence, including covert action, recruiting agents and protecting officers’ covers, is now linked to information technology. For security reasons, “employees were asked to check their digital selves at the gate,” says former CIA director Michael Hayden. That must change.
Brennan’s final reform involves personnel management. He proposes a new “CIA University” and other improvements. The goal should be to assess and develop talent as effectively as the military does, through its network of schools, training centers and promotion panels.
A final concern about this generally sensible plan: Brennan’s model managers seem to be the assistant secretaries who run bureaus at the State Department, or the combatant commanders who oversee regional forces for the Pentagon. Those structures would be better than what exists at the CIA. But as anyone who has watched Centcom in action can attest, big, unified commands can be as territorial as the individual military services ever were.
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No time for passivity in Ukraine

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Ukrainian servicemen during a training session near the eastern city of Mariupol, Ukraine on April 1. (Roman Pilipey/European Pressphoto Agency)
By Editorial Board April 9 at 7:51 PM
WHILE WESTERN attention is fixed on the Middle East, Russia’s aggression in eastern Ukraine grinds on. In blatant violation of a Feb. 15 cease-fire agreement, artillery, tanks and heavy mortars fire on Ukrainian army positions on a daily basis. Since last Saturday, nine government soldiers have been killed. The latest report of an international monitoring mission, released Wednesday, described “a general increase in the number of ceasefire violations.” The West’s non-response only makes it more likely that the offensive will escalate.
The cease-fire deal required Russian-backed forces to withdraw artillery, tanks and other heavy weapons from the front lines and place them under monitoring by inspectors of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE). Instead, many of those weapons are used in the daily shellings, while Russia sends still more across the border. “We continue to see disturbing elements of air defense, command and control, resupply equipment coming across a completely porous border,” NATO supreme commander Gen. Philip Breedlove said late last month.
The attacks by Russian-backed forces have been concentrated in two areas: north of the city of Donetsk and its airport, and east of the Black Sea port city of Mariupol. The latter is widely regarded as the most likely target of a new Russian offensive; seizing it would allow Moscow to open a corridor to the occupied province of Crimea, which it cannot currently reach by land.
Some experts believe a Russian push against Mariupol is imminent. An expert team sponsored by the Atlantic Council and the Open Society Foundation and headed by former NATO commander Wesley Clark reported last month that a Russian offensive was likely within 60 days and could come as early as next week. Mr. Clark said Moscow had deployed 9,000 troops to bolster 30,000 to 35,000 local fighters in eastern Ukraine and armed the force with 400 tanks and 700 pieces of artillery.
Ukrainian forces, Mr. Clark observed, performed well against local militants but were no match for Russian units and their advanced weapons. Among other things, the government troops have no anti-armor weapon capable of stopping a Russian T-90 tank and no radios that can’t be jammed. Like a host of experts in and outside the Obama administration, Mr. Clark, a retired four-star U.S. Army general, said a U.S. decision to provide Ukraine with defensive arms might deter a Russian attack. At a minimum, he said, the United States should pre-position equipment and announce that it would be delivered immediately in the event of a new offensive.
As it stands, Ukrainian forces could use the materiel now to save the lives of soldiers being picked off by incessant Russian shelling. Yet President Obama continues to overrule senior officials who support arms deliveries; like European Union leaders, he is ignoring the brazen cease-fire violations. U.S. and European officials say they will act if Russia actually attacks Mariupol. By remaining passive now, they make that offensive more likely.
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Puerto Ricans who can’t speak English qualify as disabled for Social Security

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Hundreds of Puerto Rico’s residents qualified for federal disability benefits in recent years because they lacked fluency in English, according to government auditors.
The Social Security Administration’s inspector general questioned the policy this month in light of the fact that Spanish is the predominant language in the U.S. territory.
Under Social Security regulations, individuals are considered less employable in the United States if they can’t speak English, regardless of their work experience or level of education.

A Puerto Rican national flag in San Juan, Puerto Rico. (Ricardo Arduengo/AP)
In a report this month, the independent watchdog suggested that a more appropriate standard might be to consider local conditions when making benefits decisions.
According to the latest U.S. Census Bureau data, 95 percent of Puerto Rico residents above age 5 speak Spanish at home, and about 84 percent say they do not speak English “very well.”
The inspector general noted that a nurse in Puerto Rico who speaks only Spanish could be considered “unskilled” under current Social Security standards.
“A claimant’s inability to communicate in English can lessen the relevance of work experience and education, potentially making it more likely the claimant will receive disability benefits,” the report said.
Auditors identified 218 cases between 2011 and 2013 in which the the Social Security Administration granted disability status to Puerto Rico residents because of the existing guidelines.
The inspector general recommended that the agency evaluate whether the rules are appropriate and to determine the number of beneficiaries who have received disability status based on their inability to communicate in English.
The Social Security Administration agreed with the proposals and said it is making preparations for a potential rule change, including by gathering research and taking input from federal experts and the public.
Josh Hicks covers the federal government and anchors the Federal Eye blog. He reported for newspapers in the Detroit and Seattle suburbs before joining the Post as a contributor to Glenn Kessler’s Fact Checker blog in 2011.
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The Iran deal: Anatomy of a disaster

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President Obama speaks at the White House about the Iranian nuclear talks. (Pablo Martinez Monsivais/ASSOCIATED PRESS)
Negotiations . . . to prevent an Iranian capability to develop a nuclear arsenal are ending with an agreement that concedes this very capability . . . 
— Henry Kissinger and George Shultz, the Wall Street Journal, April 8
Charles Krauthammer writes a weekly political column that runs on Fridays. 
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It was but a year and a half ago that Barack Obama endorsed the objective of abolition when he saidthat Iran’s heavily fortified Fordow nuclear facility, its plutonium-producing heavy-water reactor and its advanced centrifuges were all unnecessary for a civilian nuclear program. The logic was clear: Since Iran was claiming to be pursuing an exclusively civilian program, these would have to go.
Yet under the deal Obama is now trying to sell, not one of these is to be dismantled. Indeed, Iran’s entire nuclear infrastructure is kept intact, just frozen or repurposed for the length of the deal (about a decade). Thus Fordow’s centrifuges will keep spinning. They will now be fed xenon, zinc and germanium instead of uranium. But that means they remain ready at any time to revert from the world’s most heavily (indeed comically) fortified medical isotope facility to a bomb-making factory.
Obama's full remarks on Iran agreement(18:14)
In an agreement that he called "a long time coming," President Obama announced that the U.S., Iran and other countries have reached a historic framework to curb Iran's nuclear program. (AP)
And upon the expiration of the deal, conceded Obama Monday on NPR, Iran’s breakout time to a nuclear bomb will be “almost down to zero,” i.e., it will be able to produce nuclear weapons at will and without delay.
And then there’s cheating. Not to worry, says Obama. We have guarantees of compliance: “unprecedented inspections” and “snapback” sanctions.
The inspection promises are a farce. We haven’t even held the Iranians to their current obligation to come clean with the International Atomic Energy Agency on their previous nuclear activities. The IAEA charges Iran with stonewalling on 11 of 12 issues.
As veteran nuclear expert David Albright points out, that makes future verification impossible — how can you determine what’s been illegally changed or added if you have no baseline? Worse, there’s been no mention of the only verification regime with real teeth — at-will, unannounced visits to any facility, declared or undeclared. The joint European-Iranian statement spoke only of “enhanced access through agreed procedures,” which doesn’t remotely suggest anywhere/anytime inspections. And on Thursday, Iran’s supreme leader ruled out any “extraordinary supervision measures.”
The IAEA hasn’t been allowed to see the Parchin weaponization facility in 10 years. And the massive Fordow complex was disclosed not by the IAEA but by Iranian dissidents.
Yet even if violations are found, what then? First, they have to be certified by the IAEA. Which then reports to the United Nations, where Iran has the right to challenge the charge. Which then has to be considered, argued and adjudicated. Which then presumably goes to the Security Council where China, Russia and sundry anti-Western countries will act as Iran’s lawyers. Which all would take months — after which there is no guarantee that China and Russia will ratify the finding anyway.
As for the “snapback” sanctions — our last remaining bit of pressure — they are equally fantastic. There’s no way sanctions will be re-imposed once they have been lifted. It took a decade to weave China, Russia and the Europeans into the current sanctions infrastructure. Once gone, it doesn’t snap back. None will pull their companies out of a thriving, post-sanctions Iran. As Kissinger and Shultz point out, we will be fought every step of the way, leaving the United States, not Iran, isolated.
Obama imagines that this deal will bring Iran in from the cold, tempering its territorial ambitions and ideological radicalism. But this defies logic: With sanctions lifted, its economy booming and tens of billions injected into its treasury, why would Iran curb rather than expand its relentless drive for regional dominance?
An overriding objective of these negotiations, as Obama has said, is to prevent the inevitable proliferation — Egypt, Turkey, the Gulf states — that would occur if Iran went nuclear. Yet the prospective agreement is so clearly a pathway to an Iranian bomb that the Saudis are signaling thatthe deal itself would impel them to go nuclear.
You set out to prevent proliferation and you trigger it. You set out to prevent an Iranian nuclear capability and you legitimize it. You set out to constrain the world’s greatest exporter of terror threatening every one of our allies in the Middle East and you’re on the verge of making it the region’s economic and military hegemon.
What is the alternative, asks the president? He’s repeatedly answered the question himself: No deal is better than a bad deal.
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Obama, Castro to hold bilateral meeting Saturday

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President Obama walks across the Miraflores locks during his tour of the Panama Canal in Panama City on April 10. (Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP)
PANAMA CITY — President Obama and Cuban President Raúl Castro will hold a bilateral meeting Saturday on the margins of the Summit of the Americas here, the first such encounter between the two nations in more than 50 years, White House officials said.
“We anticipate that they will have a discussion,” deputy national security adviser Benjamin Rhodes said.
The two spoke by telephone Wednesday as both prepared to leave their capitals for what is likely to be a face-to-face meeting here Saturday at the 35-nation hemispheric gathering.
The call was the second the leaders have had since their simultaneous Dec. 17 announcements that Havana and Washington would normalize relations. They have met face to face only once, for a handshake at Nelson Mandela’s funeral in South Africa.
U.S.-Cuba rapprochement has been the main focus of the summit, held every three years, but never before with Cuba in attendance. Planning for an Obama-Castro meeting has been a slow diplomatic choreography since December, including three rounds of lower-level negotiations over the nuts and bolts of normalization.
Obama to remove Cuba from terrorism list(0:48)
News that the U.S. is poised to remove Cuba from its list of state sponsors of terrorism broke Thursday. Obama is attending a summit where he could come face to face with Cuban leader Raul Castro. (Reuters)
Late Thursday, Secretary of State John F. Kerry met here for hours behind closed doors with his Cuban counterpart, Bruno Rodríguez, the highest-level direct contact to date between the two governments.
Obama arrived at the two-day summit Thursday from Jamaica, where he met with leaders of the 15-nation Caribbean community, whose members make up nearly half of the countries of the hemisphere and form a formidable bloc, in numbers if not in population and economic clout, at the wider meeting here.
As he contends with vexing problems at home and abroad, the summit is likely to be a high point for Obama, whose broad popularity in the Western Hemisphere has been enhanced by the Cuba agreement. This week, the State Department recommended to Obama that he remove Cuba from the U.S. list of state sponsors of terrorism. That move, which the president may announce at the summit, would lift the last major roadblock to reestablishment of formal diplomatic relations between the United States and Cuba.
On Friday morning, Obama visited the Panama Canal, traveling by Marine One. The presidential helicopter landed at what was once Howard Air Force Base in the former U.S. Canal Zone, so the president could visit the Miraflores locks. A massive expansion of the waterway is underway and is expected to be completed next year. The widened canal will double the size of ships that can pass through the waterway, to the advantage of U.S. East Coast ports.
Earlier Friday, Obama and Panamanian President Juan Carlos Varela witnessed an agreement between Copa, the Panamanian national airline, and the chief executives of Boeing and General Electric for the purchase of $6.6 billion worth of new aircraft, the largest-ever commercial transaction between Panama and U.S. companies.
On Friday afternoon, the president will participate in a panel with leading international business and industry leaders and meet with civil society representatives who have come from throughout the hemisphere. Their presence — including opposing pro- and anti-Castro Cuban groups — has given Panama City something of a circus atmosphere. The streets are clogged with jostling pedestrians pushed to the side by the frequent motorcades moving from one event to the other.
On Saturday, the leaders will gather for a series of summit meetings. It is there that heads of state, including Obama and Castro, are expected to break away for bilateral meetings.
U.S. relations with Venezuela have been a sideshow at the summit. Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro, with signed citizen petitions in hand, has demanded that the Obama administration repeal sanctions imposed against seven officials in his government for corruption and human rights abuses. Maduro has gained some popular support after an Obama executive order declared Venezuela a “national security threat” to the United States.
Maduro, who arrived Friday morning at the summit, traveled directly from the airport to a “peoples” summit gathering in the Panama City neighborhood of El Chorrillo, where a crowd of several hundred had gathered around a monument to those who died during the 1989 U.S. invasion of Panama that drove then-president Manuel Noriega from power.
Demanding an end to U.S. “aggression” against Venezuela, Maduro’s presence here contrasted sharply with that of Obama. While the Venezuelan leader waded into the jostling crowd, where he was embraced and cheered, Obama has traveled largely by helicopter among summit and other venues. Panamanian television has shown Secret Service agents unloading trunks of weapons from an armored vehicle at each stop.
U.S. officials are making frequent appearances on local television to insist that they bear no ill will toward Venezuela. “We don’t see Venezuela as a threat to U.S. security, and we have no intention of trying to change the form of government there,” State Department spokesmen Justin Thomas told a Panamanian television interviewer Friday morning. But at the same time, he said, “we have no plans to repeal” the sanctions order, which was mandated by Congress.
Cuba, Venezuela’s main backer in the hemisphere, will have to walk a thin line between supporting Maduro’s challenge and keeping Castro’s plans for U.S. normalization on track.
The historic participation by the communist island has made for some extraordinary — but also ugly — scenes.
In one part of town Thursday, at a forum for the chief executives of major U.S. companies such as Facebook, Coca-Cola and Boeing, a Cuban trade official invited America's corporate leaders to visit the island, telling them his country was open for business.
But at a parallel event at a different location, raucous pro-Castro crowds disrupted a gathering of nonprofit and civil society groups, blocking Cuban dissidents from participating and denouncing the event's organizers for daring to invite them.
The tensions, which boiled over into a wild melee Wednesday in a city park, were a reminder that Cubans’ deep, visceral divisions will persist long after the United States reopens an embassy in Havana.
They were also signs that though the Castro government is increasingly willing to tinker with its “socialist” economic model, the experiment doesn't extend to politics. And the government remains determined to go to great lengths to stifle critics well beyond Cuba's borders.
Shouting “down with the mercenaries” and “long live Fidel and Raul [Castro],” pro-government groups turned drab hotel convention halls into confrontation sites Wednesday and Thursday, preventing other groups at the meeting from making their presentations. Other attendees whose presentations had nothing to do with the island expressed frustration that the Cubans had monopolized the forums.
The pro-Castro delegation said that several of its members were not issued credentials to attend the meetings, while Cuban dissidents had received them. They have also expressed anger at theapparent presence here of Castro archenemy and former CIA agent Felix Rodriguez, the man credited with hunting down revolutionary icon Ernesto “Che” Guevara in 1967 and overseeing his execution.
But there has been no sign of Rodriguez at the summit events where Cubans were present. The Cuban opposition figures who traveled to Panama said that the rest of the world was getting a glimpse of the political intolerance they face on the island.
“It's clear that they don't want dialogue,” said Rosa Maria Paya, the daughter of Cuban dissident Oswaldo Paya, in comments to the Associated Press. Paya blames the Cuban government for the car wreck that killed her father in 2012. She now lives in the United States.
The raucous scenes were a striking contrast to Cuba's more civil participation at events like Thursday's CEO Summit, which featured corporate titans like Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg and Mexican mega-billionaire Carlos Slim.
Rodrigo Malmierca, Cuba’s minister of foreign trade and investment, said in a speech that while U.S. sanctions continued to limit American business with the island, Obama's recent moves toward rapprochement were “a positive step.”
Malmierca said the Castro government is seeking more than $8 billion in foreign investment in its effort to spur growth. In particular, he touted the potential of a new free-trade zone west of Havana, anchored by a $1 billion port and railway project that has so far attracted more than 300 investment proposals.
Karen DeYoung is associate editor and senior national security correspondent for the Washington Post.
Nick Miroff is a Latin America correspondent for The Post, roaming from the U.S.-Mexico borderlands to South America’s southern cone. He has been a staff writer since 2006.
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Yemen’s War Leaves Aden Crumbling and Starving

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ADEN, Yemen — Rooftop snipers have emptied the streets of this dusty seaside city and swelled its hospitals and morgues.
Weeks of fighting between armed groups have left nearly 200 people dead and the city starved of water, fuel and electricity. Hospitals struggle to obtain anesthetic and dressings. Barefoot, nervous teenagers with matted hair and guns mind checkpoints on the treacherous roads. Gun battles sweep across the city while residents lie low and worry that Aden’s suffering will only increase.
“The war of hunger has not started — yet,” said Ali Bamatraf, a grocer with dwindling stocks, standing among empty food boxes that would not soon be replaced.
As war engulfs Yemen, no place in the beleaguered country has suffered as severely as Aden, a southern port city captive to ferocious street fighting for the better part of a harrowing month. Foreign navies patrol its waters and warplanes circle above, blockading a city that is steadily crumbling under reckless fire from tanks and heavy guns.
“Damaged. Ruined,” said Faris al-Shuaibi, a professor of English literature at Aden University, searching for the words to describe the beaten-up neighborhood around him. “Everything is destroyed.”
The clashes began in mid-March as a feud between forces allied with two members of Yemen’s political elite: southern fighters loyal to President Abdu Rabbu Mansour Hadi, who had retreated to Aden after being driven from the capital, against Houthi militiamen and security forces allied with Ali Abdullah Saleh, Yemen’s former leader.
Weeks later, the war has spread and become far more complicated. Saudi Arabia unleashed an air offensive last month that has failed to stop the Houthi advance. Saudi officials are threatening a ground invasion, seeing the hand of Iran, their regional nemesis, behind the Houthis, whose leaders follow an offshoot of Shiite Islam.
For many residents of Aden, though, each day has only simplified the conflict, reducing it to an existential fight. After Mr. Hadi and most of his loyal fighters quit the city, residents dusted off personal weapons and formed their own units to fight the advance of the Houthis and their allies — the latest northern invaders, they say, seeking to dominate the south.
North and South Yemen were separate countries until 1990 and fought a brief civil war four years later. For decades, southern grievances over ill treatment by the rulers in the northern capital, Sana, have festered, escalating in recent years into a movement openly calling for secession.
Professor Shuaibi was among thousands of people protesting peacefully a few months ago in Aden for an independent state, in a square adorned with pictures of southerners who had died in wars and at the hands of Mr. Saleh’s security forces.
On Thursday, he was back in the streets with a gun, preparing to join other residents fighting in the central district of Al Mualla.
The local militias are loosely organized, dominated by young men focused on securing their own neighborhoods, said Jamal Khulaqi, a 25-year-old Yemeni-American from Buffalo who said he was helping with relief efforts in the city. Most lack training and weapons apart from AK-47s.
Their opponents are mostly security men loyal to Mr. Saleh, known for their repression back when they were in power. Now, as militiamen, residents say, they are unrestrained and more brutal. “They are bombing innocent people, families,” Professor Shuaibi said.
The Houthis, fighting all over the country, are a smaller part of the force in Aden, their ranks filled with many teenagers and even some children. Some of the young Houthis who had been captured seemed filled with religious zeal and said they had been told they were going to Aden to fight Al Qaeda, the Sunni extremists the Houthis regard as their principal foe, Professor Shuaibi said.
“There is no Al Qaeda here,” he said.
Annotated maps showing the Houthi rebels’ drive south, U.S. airstrikes and historical divisions.
OPEN Map
The city has been carved up into sectors guarded by fighters with guns slung over their shoulders, drained by the stresses of war but still full of swagger. One fighter, Mohamed Saleh Salem, 38, called the local fighters “ferocious” and vowed that the Houthis would not advance, while adding that he had not had a bath in days.
The Houthis and their allies, armed with tanks and other heavy weapons, have captured several strategic areas, including a coastal road. But their hold on the city remains shaky, and they are vulnerable to repeated attacks by the local groups, which are fighting in familiar neighborhoods.
The Houthi forces respond savagely to any assault, Mr. Khulaqi said. “When someone shoots at them, they fire on buildings,” he said as he drove a friend through the city’s checkpoints to catch the only bus still shuttling people out of Aden and across the country to the Saudi border.
As dangerous as it is to travel outside the city, it has become deadly to stay. Volunteer medics said that at least 198 people had been killed and nearly 2,000 people injured in the city since March 25. The estimate was probably conservative: Ambulances have not been able to reach people in neighborhoods with the heaviest fighting, said Khadeja bin Bourek, a volunteer aid worker, who said there was also a shortage of medics at government hospitals.
Valerie Pierre, the project coordinator for Doctors Without Borders in Aden, said an average of 15 to 20 patients, most of them gunshot victims, arrived every day at a hospital where the group is working and living. The group had just received its first shipment of medical supplies by boat from the tiny East African nation of Djibouti, across a narrow strait from Aden, but still had only a third of the supplies it needed.
Ms. Pierre, a midwife, arrived in Aden in January, finding a “beautiful city, a very historic place.” Now, she and the other doctors are sequestered, listening to gun battles, sometimes distant, sometimes just outside the hospital walls.
“I am full of adrenaline, so I am still running, still motivated,” she said. “It is very scary.”
Elsewhere in the city, residents were hauling water in buckets because water tanks supplying at least four districts had been destroyed or cut off by the fighting. In many places, only a few hours of electricity was available each day. Only local neighborhood stores were open, and by 7 p.m., the streets were empty, except for the fighters.
Saudi airstrikes have mostly targeted the outskirts of the city, in an attempt to cut off the supply lines of the Houthis and their allies. There also appears to have been shelling from warships, though no one seems to know for sure.
“Aden is almost the only city in Yemen to be attacked by air, sea and land,” said Nashwan al-Othmani, a resident.
The siege has left little time to think about the political arguments dividing the country. No one seems to be clamoring for the return of Mr. Hadi, whom the Saudis have vowed to restore as president.
“There are many who criticize Hadi,” Mr. Othmani said. “There are many who accuse him of bringing the struggle to Aden and then leaving.”
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Czech President to Skip Controversial Moscow Victory Day Parade | News

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David W Cerny / Reuters Czech Republic's President Milos Zeman (L) welcomes a group of Ukrainian Czech repatriates at Prague's Ruzyne Airport March 15, 2015. The Czech government has granted residence permits to a group of some 140 people from eastern Ukraine over the security reasons in the area.
The Czech president has decided to miss a military parade during a visit to Moscow next month, a spokesman said Friday, after coming under pressure for being one of few European statesmen planning to attend the Victory Day celebrations.
Milos Zeman's plan to join the event had led to a spat with the U.S. Ambassador to the Czech Republic. The ambassador has said it would be unfortunate for Zeman to attend the parade at a time when Russian troops are destabilizing a neighbor.
European Union leaders are boycotting the ceremony over what they say is Russia's role in the conflict in Ukraine. Moscow denies Western accusations that it provides rebels in eastern Ukraine with money, arms and troops.
Zeman's trip also raised objections from junior partners in the center-left coalition government as well as right-wing opposition parties.
Milos Zeman's spokesman said the president had made a "sovereign and independent" decision to visit Moscow on May 9 to commemorate World War II victims but to skip the parade.
"The president will use time devoted by the organizers of the Moscow celebrations to the military parade ... for a bilateral meeting with Slovak Prime Minister Robert Fico," spokesman Jiri Ovcacek told reporters.
The Slovak government office said Fico's program for May 9 would be released at a later date.
Zeman has repeatedly criticized sanctions against Moscow imposed by the West in response to the annexation of Crimea and the conflict in eastern Ukraine, and has generally taken a more pro-Moscow stance than the European Union and NATO member country's government, which is responsible for foreign policy.
The cabinet has delayed the decision on whether to approve Zeman's visit to Moscow until next week.

Russian Ruble Falls Sharply as Incredible Rebound Falters | Business

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VedomostiRussian ruble and U.S. dollar banknotes are seen on a table at a bank in Moscow.
The Russian ruble fell sharply Friday afternoon, having surged to fresh 2015 highs in the morning, after the Central Bank said it was increasing the rate at which it lends foreign currency to banks in weekly repo auctions.
At 8:30 p.m. in Moscow the ruble was 2.5 percent down against the dollar at about 53.1.
The ruble had been up as much as 2 percent against the dollar in the morning, continuing a week-long rally and setting a new 2015 high of 50.27 against the dollar.
However, in the afternoon the ruble's gains were first eroded and eventually turned negative, after the Central Bank said that from Monday it was raising the rates at which it lends foreign currency to banks.
Repo rates were raised to LIBOR plus 1.5 percentage points for 7-day repos, to LIBOR plus 1.75 percentage points for 28-day repos and to LIBOR plus 2 percentage points for one-year repos.
Previously the spread over LIBOR was 1 percentage point, having been raised from 0.5 percentage points on March 27.
The Central Bank has been providing foreign currency to banks via repos since October, when it introduced the tool as a new instrument for regulating the currency market, at a time when the plummeting ruble threatened financial stability.
Since then, the cheap repo loans have helped address chronic forex shortages, with the rouble's recent rally signalling reduced need for emergency central bank financing.
The ruble is still up around 7 percent against the dollar this week, taking many analysts by surprise as the Russian currency has largely decoupled from the oil price, which is typically its key driver.
On Friday international oil benchmark Brent was up over 1.5 percent to $57.6 per barrel.
BCS analyst Mark Bradford said in a morning note that the ruble was being supported by the calm situation in eastern Ukraine, where February's Minsk peace deal appears to be holding following months of fighting between government forces and separatists.
"All the same one can't exclude a (downward) correction for both the ruble and stock indexes," he wrote, estimating the ruble's fair value at 57-58 per dollar at current oil prices.
Analysts at Rosbank said that the ruble was being buoyed by attractive ruble interest rates on currency forwards and local treasury bonds, as well as technical factors.
"The USD/RUB pair is approaching the level of the 200-day average (49.44 rubles per dollar), which strengthens the strategy of selling foreign currency," they wrote.
Russian stock indexes also turned negative on Friday afternoon, reflecting the reversal in the ruble, after strong gains in the dollar-based RTS index in the morning.
The RTS closed down 0.4 percent at 999 points, after having been 3 percent up on the day earlier in the session, while the ruble-based MICEX index was down 0.6 percent to 1,657.
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‪Russian Capital Flight Slows Sharply in First Quarter‬ | Business

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A Gordeyev / VedomostiCapital flight from Russia has slowed sharply.
‪Net capital outflow from Russia was $32.6 billion in the first quarter of the year, down from $72.9 billion in the previous three months, suggesting that panic over Russia's economic crisis has receded, data published this week by the Central Bank showed.‬‬
‪‪Capital flight from Russia nearly tripled in 2014 from the previous year, hitting $151.5 billion — the highest level on record — as steep falls in the price of oil, ‬Russia's main export,‪ and Western sanctions over the Ukraine crisis drained investor confidence.‬‬
‪‪The outflow helped sen‬d‪ the Russian currency into free fall in the fourth quarter, when it briefly plunged to 80.1 against the U.S. dollar, its lowest since the late 1990s.‬‬
‪‪The Central Bank also this week estimated Russia's first quarter ‬current account‪ surplus at $23.5 billion and the trade surplus at $40.3 billion.‬‬
‪‪The ‬bank in March‪ forecast net outflows of $111 billion this year, provided oil prices stay at $50 to $55 per barrel.‬ Brent ‬crude‪ oil, ‬the i‪nternational benchmark, was trading at around $57.5 a barrel ‬on‪ Friday.‬
‪‪Finance Minister Anton Siluanov said in March that capital flight would hit between $70 billion and $90 billion this year — a forecast that presumes a deceleration of capital flight going forward.‬‬
‪‪Last year the Central Bank raised interest rates a total of six times and 11.5 percentage points to 17 percent in an effort to support the currency and check capital outflows by making it more lucrative to hold rubles. ‬‬
‪‪The bank has since cut rates to 15 percent as the ruble strengthened and capital outflows slowed ‬thanks in part to‪ steady oil prices and an easing of tensions in eastern Ukraine. ‬
‪The ruble has strengthened by ‬more than 35 percent‪ against the dollar since late January and on Friday ‬stood‪ at ‪around 52 to the greenback — a high that some analysts warned would not last long.‬‬

Russia held military exercise in Transnistria

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Russia held a military exercise in an internationally unrecognized pro-Russian separatist region of Moldova on April 9, the Wall Street Journal reports citing Russian news agencies. 
The exercise was hosted in the breakaway republic of Transnistria, which the international community overwhelming considers to be part of Moldova. The exercise featured an estimated 400 Russian troops, who fired over 100,000 rounds of ammunition.
The troops were transported in armored personnel carriers and practiced using grenade launchers, The Daily Telegraph notes
The exercise in Transnistria raises fears that Russia may be planning to deepen its presence in a strategic foothold right at central Europe's doorstep. In a worst-case scenario, Moscow could move to annex Moldova's breakaway territory and fold it into the Russian state. Like Ukraine, Moldova is not a part of NATO and has no guarantees of mutual defense from other European countries in the event of an attack. 
Also like Ukraine, Moldova never fully pried itself away from Moscow's orbit following the collapse of the Soviet Union. Transnistria is a big part of the reason why, even though the country has a population of only a half-million people. Yet, after the collapse of the Soviet Union, Moldova, which was a Soviet republic until it gained independence in 1990, was unable to bring the Russian-speaking section of its territory under the state's control. 
A series of battles in the early 1990s led to the stationing of Russia's 14th Army in Transnistria, a deployment that continues into the present. Although the troops were meant to be withdrawn by 2002, the 2,500-strong Russian force never left, effectively freezing the conflict and leaving Transnistria as an autonomous territory and a self-declared independent republic. 
TransnistriaGoogle
In April 2014, the breakaway government of Transnistria announced that it hoped Russia would annex the territory and fold the pseudo-country into Russia following the Crimean referendum.
Moscow largely ignored the proposal at the time, but the idea could gain steam: Russia recently integrated the Georgian breakaway province of South Ossetia into Russia as of March 2015, despite international condemnation. An increased Russian presence in Transnistria, even short of annexation, would pose an increased security risk to Europe as a whole and Ukraine in particular. 
Former NATO commander Wesley Clark said that a Russian invasion of Ukraine aimed at creating a land bridge to Crimea was "imminent." The threat of a Russian incursion into Ukraine from the west via Transnistria could weaken Kiev's resolve or serve as a hypothetical staging area for a second front in the country's conflict.
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White House hacking reports highlight digital cold war between US, Russia

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Reports this week about Russian involvement in computer intrusions at the US State Department and White House bring fresh attention to growing tensions between the two nations on cybersecurity matters.
US officials have so far refused to confirm or deny reports claiming that Russian hackers were behind sophisticated attacks on unclassified networks at the White House and State Department last October. A few reports suggest that the hackers were acting on the instructions of the Russian government and that the attacks were likely retaliation for US and European Union sanctions against Russia over its actions in Ukraine.
An aide to Russian President Putin this week brushed aside recent allegations of hacking, insisting that blaming everything on Russia has become a sport for some when it comes to cybercrime.
But beneath the surface there are real tensions between the two countries that could quickly escalate, say experts. US frustration with what it views as Russia’s laissez-faire attitude toward criminal hackers has pushed American law enforcement to direct action in recent years, arresting and extraditing Russian nationals wanted for some of the biggest criminal cyberattacks in recent years. 
State sponsored Russian cybergroups are the greatest threat to US assets on the Internet, says Tom Kellermann, chief cybersecurity officer at security firm Trend Micro. Mr. Kellermann, who was a member of a task force that presented security recommendations to President Obama before his first term, says a cold war with Russia is burgeoning in cyberspace.
“[The Russians] are colonizing our most sensitive government, financial, and energy sector systems, for the purposes of reconnaissance and as a preparatory move in case tensions with NATO take a turn for the worse,” he says.
Most of the US indictments against alleged Russian hackers have been in connection with financial crimes. But security analysts say Russia’s digital capabilities in cyberspace extend well beyond the financially motivated attacks that tend to draw the most attention.
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If Russian hackers wanted to attack targets in the US, they could do it, says Tom Chapman, director of the cyberoperations group at the security firm EdgeWave, and a retired Navy intelligence officer. “Russian government hackers are some of the best in the world,” he says. “They realize the power of cybercapabilities and they are willing to use it.”
American law enforcement agencies have been stymied in their efforts to go after cybercriminals in Russia largely due to the lack of cooperation from Moscow, say experts. So their best option has been to issue indictments and wait for their targets to make mistakes such as travelling to countries that either have extradition treaties with the US or good relations with Washington. 
Some time in the next few weeks, for instance, Russian national Vadim Polyakov will be extradited to the US to face charges that he and five others hacked into 1,600 accounts at StubHub, the online ticket vendor owned by eBay, and used credit cards associated with those accounts to purchase and sell tickets to major events in New York. Prosecutors alleged the scheme caused more than $1 million in losses to StubHub.
Mr. Polyakov was seized by Spanish law enforcement outside his hotel in Salou, Spain, last July while he was vacationing there, says his New York-based criminal attorney Arkady Bukh. Spanish authorities agreed to extradite him to the US earlier this year at the American government’s request and over the Russian government’s protests.
Russia has called the pending extradition an illegal and extraterritorial application of US laws to a Russian national. In comments to Russian news agency TASS, Moscow has accused the US of ignoring a 1999 mutual legal assistance treaty and warned that Polyakov could face “ politicized justice and be subject to physical pressure” in the US.
The Russian Embassy in Washington did not respond to a request for comment.
The Polyakov case is a familiar theme, Mr. Bukh says. Polyakov is one of several Russian nationals that the US has managed to nab in similar circumstances in recent years to the increasing fury of the Russian government.
Last July, Russian lawmaker Valery Seleznyov accused the US government of kidnapping his son Roman Seleznyov after authorities in the Maldives arrested the younger Seleznyov at the Malé International Airport at the US government’s request.
Secret Service agents hustled Mr. Seleznyov to a private plane just as he was about to board a flight to Moscow, says Bukh. They flew Seleznyov to Guam, detained him there for several days, and then extradited him to Seattle where he faces charges related to his involvement in a hacking group that stole credit card numbers from US retail systems.
Another example is Vladimir Drinkman, a Russian national accused of participating in a cybercrime group that stole data on 160 million credit and debit cards by breaking into systems at the Nasdaq exchange, 7-Eleven Inc., the Carrefour City supermarket chain, Dow Jones, and JetBlue Airways Corp.
Mr. Drinkman and his alleged partner in crime, Dmitry Smilyanets, were arrested at the behest of US authorities in 2012 while vacationing in the Netherlands. Mr. Smilyanets was extradited to the US in 2012. Drinkman was extradited earlier this year and is set to face trial in a New Jersey federal court later this month in the biggest cybertheft case in US history. He faces up to 20 years in prison if convicted on all counts.
As with the other arrests, Russian authorities have labeled the extraditions of Drinkman and Smilyanets as illegal and warned that Russian nationals face “prejudgement” in US courts.
Because of the threat posed to American interests in cyberspace, US law enforcement has been serious about going after East European and Russian gangs, says Thomas Brown, a senior managing director at the forensic and litigation consulting practice at FTI Consulting.
“US law enforcement is fairly aggressive when it comes to cybercrime,” says Mr. Brown, also former chief of the cybercrime unit at the US Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York. “Being able to arrest people no matter where they are has a powerful deterrent effect.”
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Russia’s Next Target - WSJ

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Russian forces on Thursday conducted a drill near Moldova, the small, Kremlin-menaced nation wedged between Ukraine and Romania. According to Russian news agencies, 400 Russian troops participated in exercises in Transnistria, a breakaway territory of Moldova populated by ethnic Russians. They fired 100,000 rounds of ammunition.
Having annexed Crimea and pocketed Western concessions in eastern Ukraine, Vladimir Putin is eyeing the territory stretching from the Baltic Sea to the Black Sea that Moscow considers its rightful imperial domain. Mr. Putin is also sending a warning to Moldovans to abandon their dreams of Western integration.
The choice of location for the Red Army’s latest drill is significant. Transnistria—a narrow strip of land on the eastern side of the River Dniester—is sovereign Moldovan territory but is overwhelmingly ethnic Russian. It broke away soon after Moldova declared sovereignty in 1990 amid the Soviet Union’s collapse. No United Nations member-state recognizes Transnistria’s ruling regime.
Two years later Moldova made a failed attempt to retake the territory in a war that killed 1,500 people. Since then, around 1,000 Russian troops have been stationed in the territory, despite Moscow’s promise to redeploy them by 2002.
Cursed with corrupt politics and a labyrinthine parliamentary structure, Moldova remains one of Europe’s poorest countries. Even so, a majority of Moldovan voters have in the past three parliamentary elections opted for liberal, pro-Western governments. The current Prime Minister, Chiril Gaburici, appointed in February, is a pro-Western businessman who wants closer ties to the European Union.
Moscow has already punished Moldovans for seeking closer ties with the West by banning imports of Moldovan wine in 2013 and Moldovan fruit in 2014—each time on bogus health-related pretexts and each time close to Moldovan-EU summits and accords.
Thursday’s military exercises are intended to create the impression Mr. Putin might take more drastic action to subdue the defiant country. It would be nice to suppose that the West’s response to such action would be tougher than what it has so far been in Ukraine. We aren’t counting on it.
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Russia's ruble: From down-and-out to darling

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Signed in as mikenova
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Immigration Activists Hide Material Training Exec. Amnesty ‘Navigators’ In ‘Path To Power’

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Following Breitbart News’ report about the training immigration activists planned to help illegal immigrants prepare for executive amnesty, the Committee for Immigration Reform Implementation has removed the materials from public view.
Thursday, Breitbart News highlighted powerpoint presentations that were set to be used to train what the group is calling “community navigators.” In addition to educating the navigators on various aspects of immigration law and the president’s executive actions, there are slides aimed at defending the programs and amassing power.
“Once the applications are out, the best defense of the programs will be huge number of applications for [Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals] and [Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents],” read one of the powerpoint slides.
By Friday morning the powerpoints were no longer available at the organization’s “Administrative Relief Resource Center” website.
“The file you’re looking for has been moved or deleted,” the page now reads.
The powerpoints were intended to be part of a curriculum for the “community navigators,” set to be offered in the coming days.
“Community navigators (or promotores) are volunteers who receive specialized training to provide quality immigration services for their communities in an empowering and effective way. The Committee for Immigration Reform Implementation (CIRI) has developed a curriculum for organizations to use to train navigators who will be engaged in outreach, organizing, screening, document preparation, and/or application assistance related to administrative relief implementation,” reads the program’s description, still on the group’s schedule for April 13.
“The training has been fully vetted by the CIRI subcommittee on regional coordination, as well as the CIRI steering committee. We will introduce the model and discuss how it can be adapted for various contexts and demographics,” it adds.
Among the slides that led one GOP congressional aide to comment, “We’ve always known this was about recruiting Democrat voters and fundamentally transforming America. Now they’re not even hiding it anymore,” were those about defending the actions and voting.
“Components Of Defense,” read headline of one slide. It continued “Hosting house meetings; Hosting/attending large info sessions; Participating in our org! Signing people up!; VOTING.”
Another slide focused on solidifying power. “VOTE!!” read the headline, with its first bullet point reading “Path to Power” followed by another bullet point that reads “If you can’t vote: Register others; Canvas; Participate in campaigns.”
CIRI did not immediately respond to request for comment.
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Hatton Garden gem heist: Police knew about alarm but didn't attend

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  • Thieves made off with up to £200million-worth of jewels after bold break-in
  • An alarm went off around the time the heist is thought to have started
  • Police admit they were told of alert but decided not to attend premises
  • Jewellery traders brand the force 'incompetent' for not responding to call 
Published: 08:36 EST, 10 April 2015 Updated: 13:49 EST, 10 April 2015
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Police were told an alarm was going off at the scene of the Hatton Garden gem heist but decided not to attend, it emerged today.
Up to £200million of jewels were stolen in an audacious burglary over the Easter weekend, when thieves drilled into a vault at the centre of London's diamond district.
Police today confirmed that an alarm went off at the raided premises in the early hours of Friday morning, but they decided it did not need immediate investigation.
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Detective Chief Inspector Paul Johnson speaks outside Hatton Garden Safe Deposit Ltd yesterday. Police have admitted they were told an alarm was going off at the premises last week but did not attend the scene
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Detective Chief Inspector Paul Johnson speaks outside Hatton Garden Safe Deposit Ltd yesterday. Police have admitted they were told an alarm was going off at the premises last week but did not attend the scene
Scotland Yard said it got a call at 20 past midnight on Friday morning from a company who monitors alarms across the South East. 
A spokesman for the police said: 'The call stated that a confirmed intruder alarm had been activated at the Hatton Garden Safe Deposit Ltd.
'The call was recorded and transferred to the police's (computer) system. A grade was applied to the call that meant that no police response was deemed to be required.'
The spokesman added: 'We are now investigating why this grade was applied to the call. This investigation is being carried out locally.
'It is too early to say if the handling of the call would have had an impact on the outcome of the incident.'
Thieves disabled a communal lift shaft and abseiled down to the basement before using top-of-the-range power tools to break into the vault.
Once inside, they opened up to 70 safety deposit boxes in a raid described as 'sophisticated' by detectives.
After hearing the latest statement, furious jewellers branded police 'incompetent' for not attending when the alarm went off.
A call about the alert was categorised as not requiring a police response, Scotland Yard confirmed today. The raid was not discovered until Tuesday
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A call about the alert was categorised as not requiring a police response, Scotland Yard confirmed today. The raid was not discovered until Tuesday
The raiders are thought to have hid in an office before working their way down to the basement and drilling through a two-metre-thick wall into the vault and opening 70 safety deposit boxes
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The raiders are thought to have hid in an office before working their way down to the basement and drilling through a two-metre-thick wall into the vault and opening 70 safety deposit boxes
A 63-year-old trader, who asked not to be named, but had been in the business for 30 years, said: 'That statement now makes me so angry. How can they have ignored it?
'That line about "It is too early to say if the handling of the call would have had an impact" - What does that even mean? 
'Do they even believe their own rubbish? What is this nonsense about it being a "sophisticated" raid? It's rubbish.'
Asked what he would do if his box was raided he said: 'The only option you have is to claim from your own insurance and the other possibility is to actually sue the owners of the building and the police.

WHEN DID THE HEIST HAPPEN? 

Thursday, April 2: Workers from businesses in the building go home for long Easter weekend. Some have claimed the thieves were already hiding inside the building waiting to be locked in.
Friday, April 3: Police have found no signs of forced entry at the premises, but an intruder alarm sounded at the safety deposit business in the basement at 00:21. No police car was sent. Traders have claimed a security guard attended the site but said he 'wasn't paid enough' to look inside the vaults.
Saturday, April 4, Sunday April 5 and Monday, April 6: The exact time of the raid has not been confirmed, but given the amount of time it would have taken to drill through the 2-metre-thick concrete wall and opened 70 safety deposit boxes, it is thought to have taken many hours.
Tuesday, April 7: At 8am, workers return to the building and finding 'scenes of chaos'. They call the police, who attend.
'Obviously I would need more information and I can't say right now what I will do but I would consider any of these options.
'Suing anyone is a last resort but it's something I would consider as a range of options.'
He added: 'I cannot believe that we actually pay these incompetent people. I say it is a waste of b****y time trying to get answers out of them.
'It makes you want to weep. We don't even know if our things are safe.'
Asked what he kept in his security box, he said: 'Listen, it's not even about that. I'm not even interested in talking about my possessions - they're valuable but I'm not interested in that.
'It's more to do with showing people some common courtesy. I've not received a call, I've heard nothing, and then suddenly I hear that they didn't even come out when the alarm went off on Friday.
'So far as I'm concerned the police have got a lot to answer for.'
Another jeweller and pawnbroker who runs a family business with his father, added: 'It's just unbelievable that they could ignore a call from an alarm company.
'That's the thing that gets me - you ask them for four days if they actually answered a call from an alarm company and they say some c*** about how they're "investigating" it.
'They're the ones who did it, so why do they need to investigate anything? 
'The police have a lot to answer for.'
The police admission over the alarm came after potential victims had already expressed anger at being left in the dark over the investigation. 
Many are still waiting to be told if they have lost out.

THE HILTI DD350 DIAMOND CUTTER: THE STATE-OF-THE-ART TOOL USED TO BORE INTO HATTON GARDEN

The thieves used a £3,500 heavy-duty drill to make a number of holes in the reinforced concrete of the safe
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The thieves used a £3,500 heavy-duty drill to make a number of holes in the reinforced concrete of the safe
The Hatton Garden thieves used an expensive tool - the Hilti DD350 - to bore through a two metre thick wall of concrete and gain access to the deposit boxes.
The tool is part of a group of products known as 'diamond core drills', which are used to burrow through thick concrete.
Operating in a similar principle to a hole saw, they use a circular drill bit, lined with teeth, to cut a circle out of the concrete and are commonly used to create space for piping or manholes.
Variations of the drills are also used in mineral exploration, where mining companies must drive through exceptionally strong natural materials thousands of metres below the surface.
Hilti's product, which retails for £3,475, features 10 gears which can rotate the drill bit up to 667 times a minute.
It also uses a water cooling system to prevent overheating, weighs 35kg and is marketed as 'high performance, low weight'.
A 45-year-old jewellery dealer who only gave the name Sanj, said he could not believe that the police had not checked the building after an alarm sounded in the early hours of Good Friday.
'Obviously it's unbelievable that the police didn't come and check the building. I'm appalled.
'I think because the actual owners of the safe deposit are not here the police are taking it out on the rest of us. We have been in the building about a dozen times in the last few days.
'They are not telling us what's happened. A few people have been told, but the police aren't telling the others. It's like having a house burgled and being told to stay outside.'
He added: 'We're all taxpayers - the police are supposed to look after the public.'
Asked if he would consider suing the police or the storage company, he said: 'I think that's a legal decision.
'Our first port of call would be our insurance company.'
He refused to give details of what was inside his deposit box, saying: 'I wouldn't want to say - it's too sensitive.'
Speaking yesterday, safety deposit box owner Aadil Shaikh also criticised the apparent slow pace of the probe.
He added: 'We just want an assurance that they're doing whatever it takes to speed up the investigation and trying to track down those involved.' 
He also expressed anger at the company which was burgled, adding: 'This is not a Third World country, it's London for crying out loud.'
Today a young man left the building looking close to tears.
As he walked quickly away, he said: 'I'm really not in the mood to give any statements right now buddy, I'm just really, really cheesed off.'
Calls to emergency services are dealt with by an operator who grades them 'in terms of their urgency', protocol states.
Met Police policy says: 'The operator will grade the call in accordance with standard operating procedures for the type of incident. The grading will depend upon the urgency of the call.'
Amid claims the thieves disabled and removed DVD-based CCTV cameras operating in the premises, OpenSky security director Nigel Stanley said using cloud-based camera technology would be a 'no brainer'.
He said: 'In this case over the weekend, the images would have been uploaded onto the internet as they entered the premises, so that evidence would have been captured.
'Essentially if you've got a high value premises that you're trying to protect, if you install cloud CCTV and have a break in over a long weekend, they can't disrupt the uploading.' 

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Larry Kramer’s Novel ‘The American People’ Adds a Gay Dimension to History

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Fourteen years ago, the playwright and activist Larry Kramer was preparing to die. His liver was failing, and the prognosis was grave.
He summoned an old friend, Will Schwalbe, editor in chief of Hyperion Books, and made him the steward of his novel in progress, a rambling history of homosexuality and AIDS in the United States. He told Mr. Schwalbe to self-publish it if necessary, using money from Mr. Kramer’s estate.
It didn’t come to that. Mr. Kramer survived a liver transplant and finished the book, a project he had begun more than 30 years ago. Now, at 79 and against all odds and expectations, he has lived to see it published. The first volume, “The American People, Volume 1: Search for My Heart,” weighing in at 775 pages, comes out Tuesday from Farrar, Straus and Giroux. Mr. Kramer has already thrown himself into finishing the second volume, which is to come out in 2017.
“Larry lives to write,” said Mr. Schwalbe, who is now an executive vice president at Macmillan. “There’s no doubt in my mind that Larry’s writing is what keeps him alive.”
“Magnum opus” doesn’t seem like a robust enough phrase to describe the scope of “The American People,” which stretches back to the prehistoric swamps of the Everglades and concludes, in the second volume, in contemporary New York City. When Farrar acquired the two volumes in 2010, the narrative had swelled to around 4,000 pages.
Blending farce and tragedy, autobiography and fiction, it opens as Fred Lemish, a stand-in for Mr. Kramer, is struggling to finish writing a book titled “The American People,” a far-reaching historical exposé that describes Alexander Hamilton, George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, Mark Twain and other major historical figures as gay. “He’s been struggling with this history for many years,” Mr. Kramer writes of his fictional counterpart.
Mr. Kramer said he was driven to write the book because he had long felt that gays had been excluded from history books, written out or ignored. “Most history is written by straight people, and they don’t have gaydar,” Mr. Kramer said during an interview at his apartment in Greenwich Village. “People say, ‘Can you prove to me that George Washington was gay?’ and I say, ‘Can you prove to me that he wasn’t?’ ” (As evidence, Mr. Kramer notes that Washington “was surrounded by men, and he designed all their uniforms himself.”)
In the novel, and in conversation, Mr. Kramer criticizes historians and scholars like Stacy Schiff, Ron Chernow and Doris Kearns Goodwin for glossing over homosexuality in American history. If he had had his way, he would simply have called the book a work of history rather than fiction, he said.
“Farrar Straus said call it a novel, that way the lawyers will leave you alone,” he said. “But I believe everything in the book is true. It may look like fiction, but to me, it’s not.”
Mr. Chernow, the author of a well-regarded 2004 biography of Alexander Hamilton, said he was surprised to be called out in Mr. Kramer’s novel, particularly as he brings up in his book the possibility that Hamilton might have been bisexual. “I’m glad that Larry Kramer is raising the issue, I’m just mystified at why he’s attacking me, when I thought he would have applauded the fact that I take this seriously,” Mr. Chernow said. “It’s a legitimate issue for historians or novelists, but we also have to be careful not to ransack history in service of a political agenda.”
As for Mr. Kramer’s theory about Washington, Mr. Chernow countered that it was common in that era for generals to design soldiers’ uniforms. If conflicting early reviews are any indication, “The American People” is likely to be as polarizing and controversial as Mr. Kramer’s other works. While Kirkus Reviews praised the novel as “breathtakingly well-written,” others have taken a dimmer view. “To call it a rough read at times would be an understatement,” a reviewer wrote in Publishers Weekly.
“It’s like being hit by a truck, the book is so all over the place,” the novelist Andrew Holleran, who has known Mr. Kramer since the 1970s, said of the book. “What I admired as a writer was the imaginative energy and the amount he takes on.”
Jonathan Galassi, the president and publisher of Farrar, Straus and Giroux, said the book struck him as ambitious and provocative, both as a work of literature and as an act of protest.
“This book is, in a way, a culmination of all his artistic activity,” he said. “Larry is a great polemicist and a fighter, and this book is part of his polemic about gay history and the roles of gays in our society. He’s still fighting and he’s using art to do it.”
Mr. Kramer never set out to be a political activist and said that in some ways he was ill-suited to the role. “They say I’m obnoxiously noisy and angry, but I’m actually a bit of a shy person,” he said.
Early in his career, Mr. Kramer wanted to write comedy. After graduating from Yale, he worked in the film industry, and was nominated for an Oscar for his screenplay adaptation of the D. H. Lawrence novel “Women in Love” (1969). In 1978 he published a controversial novel, “Faggots,” a satire of rampant drug use and promiscuity among gays in New York. “It’s meant to be a comic novel — it made me laugh,” he said.
His mission changed in the early 1980s, when H.I.V. and AIDS began spreading rapidly among gays and claimed the lives of two friends. He was a founder of the Gay Men’s Health Crisis, a nonprofit support organization for those affected by the disease, and later started Act Up, a protest group that brought attention to the AIDS crisis. His activism spilled into his writing, with plays like “The Normal Heart” and “The Destiny of Me,” which center on gay characters confronting the AIDS epidemic and take aim at indifferent politicians and institutions.
Mr. Kramer’s activism was closely and messily intertwined with his personal life. In 1989, he learned he was H.I.V. positive and suffering from liver damage, the result of hepatitis B. He credits Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, for being among a handful of doctors who saved him by giving him experimental drugs. Mr. Kramer once vilified Dr. Fauci in print, calling him “an incompetent idiot” and a murderer, for his early approach to fighting the spread of AIDS. “The man who I criticize for allowing the virus to spread is the man who saved my life,” Mr. Kramer said.
Mr. Kramer’s acerbic and belligerent style has often alienated friends and supporters. He and the playwright Tony Kushner had a blowout over Mr. Kushner’s screenplay for the Steven Spielberg movie “Lincoln” (2012), because Mr. Kramer felt that Mr. Kushner should have depicted Lincoln as a gay man. “He and I had a major falling out over this,” Mr. Kramer said. “I so wanted him to put that in the movie.” (In “The American People,” Mr. Kramer strikes back with his own fictional Lincoln, who has a male lover and often lustily utters “mighty fine” after their encounters.)
These days, Mr. Kramer seems much less bellicose, though no less passionate. He speaks in a tremulous near-whisper and relies on a hearing aid and a cane. He spent much of last year in hospitals being treated for abdominal infections and almost died twice, he said. He was bedridden in 2013 when he and his longtime partner, the architect David Webster, were finally married in the intensive care unit of NYU Langone Medical Center.
Mr. Kramer’s writing has taken on a greater urgency lately. He has been writing for five or six hours every day, seven days a week. His progress is visible in the towering stacks of manuscript pages that cover a large table in his living room, which doubles as a work space. He is also working on a screenplay for a sequel to “The Normal Heart” and is the subject of an HBO documentary, “Larry Kramer: In Love and Anger,” which will be shown in June, just after his 80th birthday.
As he works toward finishing what he views as the defining work of his career, Mr. Kramer said he hoped to be remembered for his art as much as his activism.
“It goes against the grain in this country to do both, and that’s why I’m not taken seriously,” he said. “I want this book to be taken seriously as a work of art and a work of thought.”
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Review: Judith Miller’s ‘The Story: A Reporter’s Journey’

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In late 2002 and through 2003, Judith Miller, an investigative reporter at The New York Times, wrote a series of articles about the presumed presence of chemical and biological weapons and possible nuclear matériel in Iraq. Critics thought the articles too bellicose and in lock step with the George W. Bush administration’s march to war. They all included careful qualifiers, but their overwhelming message was that Saddam Hussein posed a threat.
Ms. Miller’s defense of her work then was straightforward: She reported what her sources told her. She has now written a book-length elaboration of that defense, “The Story: A Reporter’s Journey.” The defense is no better now than it was then.
“The Story,” as anodyne a title as one could imagine, briefly sketches Ms. Miller’s early life before devoting itself to a more detailed description of her career. She came from a troubled home in Nevada and grew into an intrepid young woman who, she writes, liked adventure, sex and martinis.
With very little experience, she joined the Washington bureau of The Times in 1977 as a reporter, a prized assignment, largely because the newspaper was facing a lawsuit accusing it of sex discrimination, she writes. The chapter describing this is titled “The New York Times, the Token.” She was very raw and her early work showed it. An editor told her she was sloppy and unprofessional. She learned professionalism fast enough that in 1983 she was posted to Cairo, one of the first women to head an international bureau for The Times.
Correspondents in Cairo are typically charged with covering the whole of the Arab world, from West Africa to Iraq. Sometimes, non-Arab Iran is thrown in just for fun. This is an impossible if enthralling job and, in Ms. Miller’s telling, she fell hard for it. It was “thrilling” and “exhilarating,” she writes.
Ms. Miller recounts longstanding friendships with, among others, King Hussein of Jordan, who failed in an attempt to teach her water-skiing.
She was one of the earliest mainstream journalists to report on growing radicalization within Islam. She was also one of the earliest to report on the difficulties that could be imagined when the new radicals crossed paths with another emerging problem — the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. This became a subject she would return to throughout her career.
Ms. Miller devotes several chapters, by far the most given to any subject, to her coverage of Iraq. She had missed the first Persian Gulf war, she writes, stranded in Saudi Arabia. She fought hard to be included in coverage of the next one. The string of exclusive articles she produced before the Iraq war had the effect of buttressing the Bush administration’s case for invasion.
She had built her career on access. She describes finding, cultivating and tending to powerfully situated sources. She writes that she did not, as some critics of her prewar reporting supposed, sit in her office and wait for the phone to ring. She pounded the pavement. And an ambitious reporter with the power, prestige and resources of a large news organization behind her can cover a lot of road.
Opponents of the Iraq invasion and media critics of her reporting accused her of being a secret neoconservative thirsting for war. Whatever her actual politics, though, the agenda that comes through most strongly here is a desire to land on the front page. She rarely mentions an article she wrote without noting that it appeared on the front page or complaining that it did not.
During the war, she writes, she was the sole reporter embedded with the military team charged with finding Iraq’s weapons of mass destruction. It failed, meaning so had she. Ms. Miller concedes that the Bush administration’s case for war was built largely on Iraq’s presumably ambitious weapons program. In describing what went wrong with one particular claim, she offers a defense that is repeated throughout the book: “The earlier stories had been wrong because the initial intelligence assessments we reported were themselves mistaken — not lies or exaggerations.”
Ms. Miller’s main defense is that the experts she relied upon — intelligence officials, weapons experts, members of the Bush administration and others — were wrong about Mr. Hussein’s weapons. She acknowledges being wrong but not making any mistakes. She quotes herself telling another reporter: “If your sources were wrong, you are wrong.” This is where she gets stuck.
Journalists, especially those who have a talent for investigative work, are taught early to write big, to push the story as far as possible. Be careful; nail the facts; be fair, but push hard. Nobody pushed harder than Ms. Miller. In this case, she wound up implicitly pushing for war.
A deeper critique of her own reporting, and through that example a critique of the entire enterprise of investigative reporting, would examine its inherently prosecutorial nature. Investigators — journalistic or otherwise — are constantly trying to build a case, to make things fit even when they don’t obviously do so. In the process, the rough edges of the world can be whittled away, nuance can become muddled in the reporter’s head, in the writing, or in the editing.
The final section of “The Story” deals with Ms. Miller’s role in the Valerie Plame affair, her refusal to identify a source (for an article she never wrote), her jailing because of that refusal, and finally her forced resignation from The Times in 2005. As she describes it, she wasn’t simply abandoned but thrown overboard. This seems partly because of politics and institutional embarrassment, but also partly because of her personality. Almost every investigative reporter is in some way difficult to deal with. Ms. Miller was no exception. She offended colleagues on the way up, she says, and they delighted in her failure when she fell down.
To Ms. Miller’s credit, this is not a score-settling book, although Bill Keller, the executive editor who she says forced her out of The Times, gets walked around the block naked a couple of times and competing reporters receive just-for-old-times’-sake elbows to their rib cages.
That doesn’t mean she has made peace with the end of her career at The Times. It was a devastating exile for a proud and influential reporter. Cast out of the journalistic temple, she says she felt “stateless,” and from the evidence here she remains a bit lost. This sad and flawed book won’t help her be found.

THE STORY
A Reporter’s Journey
By Judith Miller
381 pages. Simon & Schuster. $27.
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Review: ‘One of Us,’ by Asne Seierstad, on Anders Breivik’s Rampage in Norway

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The nonfiction horror story told in “One of Us: The Story of Anders Breivik and the Massacre in Norway” moves slowly, inexorably and with tremendous authority. It’s a sober book that smells like fresh construction, a house built from plain hard facts. You’re forced to bring your own emotion, and it pools beneath the steady sentences.
Asne Seierstad is a Norwegian journalist and writer best known for her 2003 book “The Bookseller of Kabul.” In “One of Us,” she chronicles her country’s Sept. 11, the July day in 2011 when Anders Behring Breivik detonated a homemade bomb in central Oslo, outside the prime minister’s office, killing eight, before driving to a youth camp on the wooded nearby island of Utoya.
There, over the course of more than an hour, he methodically gunned down 69 more. Most were teenage members of the governing Labour Party, and they were among Norway’s brightest and most promising young people.
“One of Us” is, at bottom, Mr. Breivik’s story. The author follows him from birth through his conviction at trial and imprisonment. He declined to be interviewed by Ms. Seierstad. But she puts us at crucial moments directly inside his head, his thoughts lifted from his own written statements and interviews.
Ms. Seierstad has read everything about Mr. Breivik and the case, interviewed everyone. (Her epilogue, about her methods, should be required reading in journalism schools.) She is determined to see Mr. Breivik, so much so that her steely approach put me in mind of something Roy Blount Jr. once said: “If you won’t talk to me I’ll write about your face. If you won’t look at me I’ll write about the back of your head.”
Many other stories are told here. There are profiles of several of the victims and their families. There is strong writing about Norway’s national character, its politics and its debate about immigration. “One of Us” slowly builds to a comprehensive indictment of the actions, that day, of Norway’s police and security apparatus.
How was this lone gunman able to shoot children, utterly unchallenged, for so very long? Ms. Seierstad isolates the mistakes in what she calls — paraphrasing the prime minister’s thoughts, for she avoids editorializing — “an odyssey of misadventure and terrible planning.”
Mr. Breivik, born in 1979, was raised in an affluent Oslo neighborhood by a single mother who had survived a blinkered childhood. She was psychologically unstable, and sometimes considered putting Mr. Breivik and his half sister into foster care. He was lonely as a boy, moody and sometimes violent.
He wore the wrong clothes, said the wrong things. He was vain, wore makeup and had a high, giggling voice. He found solace in hip-hop and became a graffiti artist, though he wasn’t accepted by his tagger peers. He dropped out of high school because he wanted to make money and get on with his life.
He had some successful business ventures, including one selling bogus diplomas online. He found Norwegian girls too liberated, and contacted a mail-order bride who arrived from Belarus. She quickly fled back home. At 27, isolated and feeling like a failure, he moved back in with his mother.
Back home, he essentially didn’t leave his room for five years. Any parent who has a child submerged too deeply in video games will read about what happens next with their hearts up around their ears. Mr. Breivik became obsessed with the online game World of Warcraft, which he would sometimes play for 17 straight hours.
He became a hermit. Inside the game, he achieved a kind of mastery he never felt in the real world. He became grandiose. Online he fell into right-wing politics and became obsessed with the threat of Islam and multiculturalism in Europe. Maxing out credit cards, he began to buy weapons.
The section of this book in which he rents an isolated farm and begins to assemble his bomb and collect his armaments is so finely detailed that it reads like the most dire episode of “Breaking Bad” imaginable. You will learn more than you wanted to know about boiling sulfuric acid, weaponizing fertilizer pellets and handling liquid nicotine.
Then the attack itself is underway. The roughly 70 pages Ms. Seierstad devotes to it are harrowing in their forensic exactitude. She seems to note the trajectory and impact of every bullet Mr. Breivik fired. “I will kill you all, Marxists!” he was heard to say.
Ms. Seierstad does not write the kind of prose, in this fluent translation from the Norwegian by Sarah Death, that is easy to quote. But here is a snippet about that day on Utoya:
“He advanced steadily through the heather. His boots stamped deeply into the ground as he walked over harebells, clover and trefoil. Some decaying branches snapped underfoot. His skin was pale and damp, and his thin hair was swept back. His eyes were light blue. Caffeine, ephedrine and aspirin ran in his bloodstream. By this point he had killed 22 people on the island.”
We are not spared the blood, vomit and urine. Nor scenes like a child holding her blasted jaw in place, or a boy touching his own brain matter, now outside his shattered skull. These scenes are balanced by moments of tremendous heroism, and I’d be lying if I said I didn’t read the final half of “One of Us” with perpetually moist cheeks.
Was Mr. Breivik a political terrorist or simply a madman? This is the fundamental question weighed at his trial, and this book offers prismatic evidence for each view. Only in the epilogue does the strain of considering his life show in the author’s voice.
It’s said that exact detail is uniquely helpful when it comes to mending after terrible events. If it is true, as Stephen Jay Gould contended, that “nothing matches the holiness and fascination of accurate and intricate detail,” then Ms. Seierstad has delivered a holy volume indeed.

ONE OF US
The Story of Anders Breivik and the Massacre in Norway
By Asne Seierstad
530 pages. Farrar, Straus and Giroux. $28.
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NATO Caps Size of Russia’s Mission After Internal Reports of Espionage

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WASHINGTON — For a year after the North Atlantic Treaty Organization cut back its cooperation with Russia as punishment for the country’s incursions into Ukraine, Russia’s NATO mission has seemed curiously impervious to the deteriorating ties.
Its delegation to the military alliance’s headquarters in Brussels still has more than 50 members, more than the delegations of a number of NATO countries.
Not for long. NATO, publicly citing an administrative effort to limit the size of delegations from “partner nations” like Russia, has capped them at 30 members.
But Western officials said the move also followed a confidential assessment by the alliance’s Civilian Intelligence Committee that intelligence agents had been part of Russia’s delegation.
No one is shocked that spies might be in Russia’s delegation, and shrinking its size would hardly eliminate the risk of espionage, said the Western officials, who asked not to be identified talking about intelligence issues. But they said it could make the problem easier to manage.
Besides, now that cooperation between Russia and NATO has been suspended, the Russian delegation has far more people than it could possibly need, the officials said.
Well staffed though it may be, the Russian Mission to NATO has not rushed to comment on the decision. A spokeswoman for the mission said Thursday that Alexander V. Grushko, Russia’s ambassador to NATO, might speak, but not before Friday morning.
The move is only the latest difficulty in a relationship that has been fraught from the start.
President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia has objected strenuously to the alliance’s decision to take in new Central European members and expand to include 28 nations. He has been equally vociferous about NATO’s plans to field antimissile defenses in Europe.
The United States maintains that the antimissile systems are directed against a potential Iranian threat, but Russia fears they may eventually evolve into a system that could blunt Russia’s nuclear deterrent.
Still, NATO has sought to work with Russia on Afghanistan, maritime operations and counterterrorism, among other issues. And after the collapse of the Soviet Union, that cooperation became a potent symbol of the reduction in Cold War enmity.
In 1994, Russia joined NATO as a partner nation that would not officially belong to the military alliance but would cooperate with it. (There are now 41 partner nations.)
A “Founding Act” between NATO and Russia, issued in 1997, proclaimed that the two sides no longer saw each other as adversaries and were committed to “overcoming the vestiges of earlier confrontation.” A year later, a senior Russian envoy to NATO said that the alliance and Russia would “make our way step by step.
The NATO-Russia Council was later established to discuss security concerns. And early last year, NATO’s and Russia’s navies planned to jointly escort the Cape Ray, a specially configured American vessel that destroyed tons of chemical weapons ingredients removed from Syria. But after the Ukraine crisis erupted, the joint naval mission, which was supposed to be a model for American-Russian cooperation, was scrubbed, though the destruction of the chemical weapons went ahead.
And by May 2014, it was the Founding Act that seemed to be the vestige from a previous era.
“Clearly, the Russians have declared NATO as an adversary, so we have to begin to view Russia no longer as a partner but as more of an adversary than a partner,” Alexander R. Vershbow, the deputy secretary general of NATO and a former American ambassador to Moscow, told reporters in Washington last year.
Last April, NATO decided to curtail military and civilian cooperation with Russia, while maintaining political contacts, because of its role in the Ukraine crisis.
Since then, just four members of Russia’s large delegation have credentials that allow them to go to NATO headquarters without an escort: the ambassador, the deputy ambassador, a driver and an assistant.
Despite the precipitous downturn in relations, Mr. Grushko has continued to meet with senior NATO officials in Brussels and has been included in meetings with other partners.
But with no real cooperation to nurture, Russia’s delegation shrank to the current 50-plus from 70 at the end of last year.
The new 30-person ceiling — NATO calls it a “guideline” — is not being imposed immediately. Partner nations have nine months to comply and will be able to decide which staff members to keep. Russia and the other partner nations were officially notified of the new personnel limit last week.
With NATO set to move into a new headquarters in Brussels next year, the alliance has publicly presented the move as an administrative effort to manage the growing number of partner nations.
“Currently, NATO pursues dialogue and practical cooperation with 41 partner countries,” said Carmen Romero, a deputy NATO spokeswoman. “This is a practical measure, which applies to all partners at NATO headquarters, including Russia.”
But Western officials said Russia might, in fact, be the only partner nation affected by the new cap.
NATO’s intelligence committee, which made the assessment that members of the Russian delegation had been using their status to spy, is led by Norway under a rotating chairmanship and is made up of representatives from the intelligence services of all of the alliance’s members.
The West has previously expelled Russian diplomats for espionage. But the suspension of NATO’s cooperation with Russia and the alliance’s coming headquarters move have provided it with an opportunity to take more far-reaching and, some Western diplomats say, long overdue action.
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Russian Nuclear Submarine Catches Fire During Repairs

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MOSCOW — A Russian nuclear submarine caught fire while undergoing repairs in a dry dock outside the city of Arkhangelsk and smoke billowed from it through the day on Tuesday. But emergency officials told Russian news agencies that the submarine posed no risk of leaking radiation because its nuclear fuel and armaments had been removed before the work began.
Ria, a state news agency, reported that sparks from welding most likely set off the fire on the vessel, an attack submarine of the same type as the submarine Kursk that sank in the Barents Sea in 2000. In the Kursk sinking and subsequent accidents on Russia’s nuclear submarines, the Russian Navy has been slow in acknowledging the gravity of emergencies.
Firefighters planned to flood the dry dock to extinguish the fire, the news agency said.

With Details of Iran Deal Still in Flux, White House Opens Sales Effort

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WASHINGTON — President Obama has compared the preliminary accord on limiting Iran’s nuclear program to signing a contract to buy a house, emphasizing that the deal is not done until it closes. But a more accurate analogy might be that the administration bought a house under construction and is still haggling over where the windows and doors should go.
As the White House opens its campaign to sell the merits of the nuclear deal, the unexplained elements of the agreement are about such basics, including precisely the kind of research and development Iran would be able to conduct on new types of centrifuges to make uranium and how fast it could produce the nuclear material for a bomb after the 10-year agreement period expired.
Those gaps have already been seized upon by critics, from Israel to Saudi Arabia to the halls of Congress, as they seek to influence the shape of the final agreement, scheduled to be completed by June 30.
“It is imperative to clarify several amorphous issues in the statement of principles and define them better in the final agreement,” wrote Amos Yadlin, who heads a research center at Tel Aviv University. “Without such clarifications, the target set by the U.S. president will not be achieved.”
Consider the issue of building highly efficient centrifuges, the machines that enrich uranium. The Obama administration’s account is that Iran would be stuck with its old, unreliable, 1970s-style centrifuges for a decade — and that it would have so little nuclear fuel that there would be no way for the country to produce enough nuclear material to make a bomb in less than a year.
That is a major selling point of the accord, because the current “breakout time” is two to three months. But in the same interview where he compared the deal to buying a house, Mr. Obama told National Public Radio that this breakout time could shrink significantly in the final years of a 15-year accord. This is because the Iranians would conduct some yet to be specified research on advanced centrifuges, and would be able to get them up and running after the decade-long restrictions expired.
“A more relevant fear would be that in year 13, 14, 15, they have advanced centrifuges that enrich uranium fairly rapidly, and at that point the breakout times would have shrunk almost down to zero,” Mr. Obama said, conceding a point that Israel’s intelligence minister made on Monday.
Mr. Obama argued that even so, the deal was worth it. The American strategy for dealing with the Iranian nuclear program for the past decade or longer has been to buy time, by slowing the effort with sanctions and sabotage. He cast the emerging agreement in the same light.
He conceded that after the expiration of any deal, a successor might have to deal with breakout times that are “much shorter, but at that point we have much better ideas about what it is that their program involves.”
“We have much more insight into their capabilities,” he said. “And the option of a future president to take action if in fact they try to obtain a nuclear weapon is undiminished.”
(After Republicans pounced on his statements as an admission that the accord would not stop Iran from developing a bomb as soon as the agreement lapsed, a State Department spokeswoman said that Mr. Obama’s remarks had been taken out of context and that he had been referring to a hypothetical situation in which there was no deal.)
The likelihood that Iran would be allowed to emerge with an advanced uranium enrichment program after the accord expired has been a source of enormous anxiety in Israel and Saudi Arabia, which want to keep Iran from becoming a “threshold” nuclear power. Just how much the Iranians would be allowed to operate the more modern centrifuge in the waning years of an agreement remains unclear, and critics are certain to press the White House for tight restrictions.
On other components of the preliminary accord, the administration has been conspicuously vague — perhaps to maintain negotiating flexibility or because the two sides are still at odds.
One example is how Iran’s 10-ton uranium stockpile would be reduced to 700 pounds — the amount the United States says would be the limit. For months, based on statements from Iranian, European and American officials, it had been assumed that Iran would agree to export the uranium to Russia, where it would be converted into fuel for Iran’s lone commercial reactor.
But Mr. Obama acknowledged that the fuel may stay inside the country. Two people with knowledge of the negotiations say Iran has agreed to “dilute” its low-enriched uranium to its natural state. In other words, having spent hundreds of millions of dollars or more to enrich uranium, Iran would spend more money to un-enrich it.
At least publicly, Iran has not ruled out other approaches, including one in which the uranium would be converted into solid reactor fuel. That approach would give Iran the chance to reconvert the fuel back to a form that could be used to enrich the uranium to bomb-grade fuel, Gary Samore, a former adviser to Mr. Obama on weapons of mass destruction, wrote in Foreign Affairs.
So what is the understanding with Iran on the handling of its stockpile? The administration will not say, but critics insist that this provision be clarified.
There are similar questions about the giant underground installation at Fordo — impervious to attack, except by the largest bunker-busting bomb in America’s arsenal. No fissile material would be located at the site. Nor would Iran be allowed to enrich uranium there for 15 years.
But Iran would be allowed to keep 1,000 centrifuges at Fordo, about 300 of which would be used to produce medical isotopes. The others, it seems, would be on “warm standby” — along with another 1,000 at the Natanz enrichment site — where they could be used for enrichment in case the deal fell apart.
Abbas Araqchi, Iran’s deputy foreign minister, has been quoted by Iranian journalists as saying the modifications to the Fordo plant could be reversed quickly if the United States does not hold up its end of the deal.
The issues still left to negotiate have added to the uncertainty about the emerging deal.
On Tuesday, Wendy Sherman, the chief negotiator for the State Department, acknowledged that anyone listening to the descriptions of the agreement in Washington and in Tehran might wonder if they were hearing about the same one.
“We understood that our narratives were likely to be somewhat different but we pledged to try not to contradict each other,” she said on MSNBC.
With three months to go, however, it seems clear that there are still significant gaps in the accord and no shortage of American, Israeli and Arab experts with advice on how to fill them.
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China Is Said to Use Powerful New Weapon to Censor Internet

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SAN FRANCISCO — Late last month, China began flooding American websites with a barrage of Internet traffic in an apparent effort to take out services that allow China’s Internet users to view websites otherwise blocked in the country.
Initial security reports suggested that China had crippled the services by exploiting its own Internet filter — known as the Great Firewall — to redirect overwhelming amounts of traffic to its targets. Now, researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, and the University of Toronto say China did not use the Great Firewall after all, but rather a powerful new weapon that they are calling the Great Cannon.
The Great Cannon, the researchers said in a report published Friday, allows China to intercept foreign web traffic as it flows to Chinese websites, inject malicious code and repurpose the traffic as Beijing sees fit.
The system was used, they said, to intercept web and advertising traffic intended for Baidu — China’s biggest search engine company — and fire it at GitHub, a popular site for programmers, and <a href="http://GreatFire.org" rel="nofollow">GreatFire.org</a>, a nonprofit that runs mirror images of sites that are blocked inside China. The attacks against the services continued on Thursday, the researchers said, even though both sites appeared to be operating normally.
But the researchers suggested that the system could have more powerful capabilities. With a few tweaks, the Great Cannon could be used to spy on anyone who happens to fetch content hosted on a Chinese computer, even by visiting a non-Chinese website that contains Chinese advertising content.
“The operational deployment of the Great Cannon represents a significant escalation in state-level information control,” the researchers said in their report. It is, they said, “the normalization of widespread and public use of an attack tool to enforce censorship.”
The researchers, who have previously done extensive research into government surveillance tools, found that while the infrastructure and code for the attacks bear similarities to the Great Firewall, the attacks came from a separate device. The device has the ability not only to snoop on Internet traffic but also to alter the traffic and direct it — on a giant scale — to any website, in what is called a “man in the middle attack.”
China’s new Internet weapon, the report says, is similar to one developed and used by the National Security Agency and its British counterpart, GCHQ, a system outlined in classified documents leakedby Edward J. Snowden, the former United States intelligence contractor. The American system, according to the documents, which were published by The Intercept, can deploy a system of programs that can intercept web traffic on a mass scale and redirect it to a site of their choosing. The N.S.A. and its partners appear to use the programs for targeted surveillance, whereas China appears to use the Great Cannon for an aggressive form of censorship.
The similarities of the programs may put American officials on awkward footing, the researchers argue in their report. “This precedent will make it difficult for Western governments to credibly complain about others utilizing similar techniques,” they write.
Still, the Chinese program illustrates how far officials in Beijing are willing to go to censor Internet content they deem hostile. “This is just one part of President Xi Jinping’s push to gain tighter control over the Internet and remove any challenges to the party,” said James A. Lewis, a cybersecurity expert at the Center for Strategic Studies in Washington.
Beijing continues to increase its censorship efforts under its State Internet Information Office, an office created under Mr. Xi to gain tighter control over the Internet within the country and to clamp down on online activism. In a series of recent statements, Lu Wei, China’s Internet czar, has called on the international community to respect China’s Internet policies.
Sarah McKune, a senior legal adviser at the Citizen Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto and a co-author of the report, said, “The position of the Chinese government is that efforts to serve what it views as hostile content inside China’s borders is a hostile and provocative act that is a threat to its regime stability and ultimately its national security.”
The attacks also show the extent to which Beijing is willing to sacrifice other national goals, even economic ones, in the name of censorship. Baidu is China’s most visited site, receiving an estimated 5.2 million unique visitors from the United States in the past 30 days, according to Alexa, a web ranking service.
Kaiser Kuo, a Baidu spokesman, said that Baidu was not complicit in the attacks and that its own networks had not been breached. But by sweeping up Baidu’s would-be visitors in its attacks, researchers and foreign policy experts say, Beijing could harm the company’s reputation and market share overseas.
Beijing has recently said that it plans to help Chinese Internet companies extend their influence and customer base abroad. At a meeting of the National People’s Congress in China last month, Premier Li Keqiang announced a new “Internet Plus” action plan to “encourage the healthy development of e-commerce, industrial networks and Internet banking and to guide Internet-based companies to increase their presence in the international market.”
Yet the latest censorship offensive could become a major problem for Chinese companies looking to expand overseas. “They know one of their biggest obstacles is the perception that they are tools of the Chinese government,” Mr. Lewis said. “This is going to hurt Baidu’s chances of becoming a global competitor.”
Researchers say they were able to trace the Great Cannon to the same physical Internet link as China’s Great Firewall and found similarities in the source code of the two initiatives, suggesting that the same authority that operates the Great Firewall is also behind the new cyberweapon.
“Because both the Great Cannon and Great Firewall are operating on the same physical link, we believe they are both being run under the same authority,” said Bill Marczak, a co-author of the report who is a computer science graduate student at the University of California, Berkeley, and a research fellow at Citizen Lab.
Mr. Marczak said researchers’ fear is that the state could use its new weapon to attack Internet users, particularly dissidents, without their knowledge. If they make a single request to a server inside China or even visit a non-Chinese website that contains an ad from a Chinese server, the Great Cannon could infect their web communications and those of everyone they communicate with and spy on them.
Ultimately, researchers say, the only way for Internet users and companies to protect themselves will be to encrypt their Internet traffic so that it cannot be intercepted and diverted as it travels to its intended target.
“Put bluntly,” the researchers said, “unprotected traffic is not just an opportunity for espionage but a potential attack vector.”
Read the whole story
 
· · · · ·

For Mentally Ill Inmates, a Cycle of Jail and Hospitals

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It was not a particularly violent crime that sent Michael Megginson to Rikers Island. He was arrested for stealing a cellphone.
But in jail, Mr. Megginson, who is 25 and has been in and out of psychiatric hospitals since the age of 6, quickly deteriorated, becoming one of the most violent inmates on the island.
In his 18 months there, he was constantly involved in some kind of disturbance, his records show. He fought with other inmates and officers; spit and threw urine at them; smashed windows and furniture and once stabbed an officer in the back of the head with a piece of glass.
At least twice, his bones were broken in beatings by guards.
He also repeatedly hurt himself, cutting his body all over, banging his head against walls and tying sheets and clothing around his neck in apparent suicide attempts.
There were times he became severely psychotic. He once stripped naked and broke the toilet in his cell, causing a flood. “I’m trying to save everybody from the devil with holy water,” he said, according to jail records.
For years, Rikers has been filling with people like Mr. Megginson, who have complicated psychiatric problems that are little understood and do not get resolved elsewhere: the unwashed man passed out in a public stairwell; the 16-year-old runaway; the drug addict; the belligerent panhandler screaming in a full subway car.
It is a problem that cuts two ways. At the jail, with its harsh conditions and violent culture, the mentally ill can deteriorate, their symptoms worsening in ways Rikers is unequipped to handle. As they get sicker, they strike out at guards and other correction employees, often provoking more violence.
Judges, prosecutors, police officers and correction leaders, as well as elected officials like Mayor Bill de Blasio, have grown increasingly vocal about the damage that incarceration can do to these men and women.
By now, Mr. Megginson’s Legal Aid lawyer had expected him to be freed. But his volatile behavior has kept him behind bars, and recently he was transferred to a state psychiatric prison hospital for violent criminals with no set release date.
The New York Times spent 10 months examining Mr. Megginson’s troubled life, conducting hours of interviews with him as well as his family members, doctors and lawyers. With his permission, The Times also reviewed thousands of pages of medical, disciplinary and legal records from his time at Rikers and in hospitals, community programs and supervised housing.
Though there may be a consensus that Michael Megginson does not belong in jail, there is no agreement about where else he could go. At times, he was just as violent in hospitals. He once jumped over a nurses’ station at Kings County Hospital Center in Brooklyn, attacking clinicians; during a stay in St. Barnabas Hospital in the Bronx, he was placed in restraints 11 times.
But unlike jail, psychiatric hospitals treated his behavior as a symptom of illness. If he was out of control, he was often given an injection to knock him out and was placed in a quiet room until he was calm.
In interviews, members of Mr. Megginson’s family said they believed that longer-term hospitalization would be best for him. But that option has all but disappeared. For the last four decades, the push in the mental health field has been to close these hospitals. Since a 1970s Supreme Court ruling that was meant to protect civil liberties, only the very sickest patients can be involuntarily held for an extended period.
Mr. Megginson was repeatedly released from state hospitals against his doctors’ wishes because he did not meet legal requirements for involuntary commitment.
His treatment has cost millions of dollars in public funds. Outside of hospitals, he was enrolled in some of the most successful outpatient and community programs in the mental health field.
He failed out of all of them.
Which raises the question: Is there any place for Michael Megginson?
OVER THE LAST DECADE, the proportion of inmates with diagnosed mental illness has climbed dramatically. Today, they make up nearly 40 percent of the population at Rikers, a total of 4,000 men and women at any given time, more than all the adult patients in New York State psychiatric hospitals combined.
Several have shown that they are more likely than other inmates to be the victims as well as the perpetrators of violence.
In July, The Times documented 129 cases from 2013 in which inmates were beaten so severely during encounters with officers that they required emergency care. Seventy-seven percent of the inmates had a mental health diagnosis.
Mr. Megginson was one of the 129. In October 2013, a nurse found him facedown on a cellblock floor, beaten unconscious. Several bones in his face were broken, and his shoulder was dislocated.
When he returned from Elmhurst Hospital in Queens, he was punished with 127 days in solitary confinement.
National penal experts have been impressed by Mr. de Blasio’s efforts to make Rikers a safer and more humane place. In the last year, the mayor has appropriated tens of millions of dollars to create specialized therapeutic units that reward improvements in behavior. He has also scaled back a punitive system that had kept some inmates locked away in solitary confinement for more than a year.
But individuals like Mr. Megginson burn through resources, requiring services that jails had never been expected to provide. Each Wednesday, the department’s chief, two assistant chiefs and five wardens meet with the jail’s top mental health officials to discuss what to do about a small number of the most disruptive inmates — a group that included Mr. Megginson.
His problems have been a long time in the making. Psychiatrists can’t even agree on what’s wrong with him. He has been confined in psychiatric hospitals at least 20 times and labeled with almost every diagnosis that could be applied to a person with a history of aggressive behavior: schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, polysubstance dependence, attention deficit disorder, impulse control disorder, antisocial personality disorder and intermittent explosive disorder.
From the time he was a little boy, growing up in the Kingsbridge section of the Bronx, he had uncontrollable rages. He bit teachers, fought with classmates, urinated on hospital staff and refused to go to school for weeks at a time. At age 6, he spent nearly a month at Bronx Children’s Psychiatric Center, a state hospital.
His home life was often unstable. His father, who is also mentally ill, was in and out of prison. In 1990, shortly after his mother gave birth to him at age 16, she moved to Florida, leaving him with his great-grandmother for several years.
Many members of his extended family had mental illness and substance abuse problems. His paternal grandparents were both alcoholics, and his maternal grandfather died after falling out a window — or possibly jumping.
His mother, Shakima Smith-White, acknowledged that she was not always there for her son initially. But she said she re-entered his life full-time when he started school. She has been married now for 20 years, works two jobs and is studying to be a nurse practitioner.
“We weren’t perfect, but we tried with Michael,” she said.
When he was 5, she said, she took him to Miami on her honeymoon, to her husband’s dismay. And when Michael was going through a bad stretch in his late teens, she said, her husband took their two daughters and moved out, worried it was too dangerous to stay. “He pretty much gave me an ultimatum, that it was him or Michael,” she said. “And I chose my son.”
“At the time he needed me more than the girls or my husband,” she said.
When Mr. Megginson was doing well, she said, he was wonderful to be around — calm, affectionate, funny.
“Normally something would happen that would be like a great disappointment,” she said. “Or someone would anger him and he would lash out, and from there he would just spiral downwards.”
In an interview at Rikers, Mr. Megginson said his great-grandmother had been the most important person in his life. When he was 10 and she died, he said, it was devastating. “The way my mental illness led to an outbreak of getting worse was when my great-grandmother passed,” he said. “It tore my insides out and gave me a lot of darkness.”
By age 12, he had been admitted to Bronx Children’s Psychiatric Center four times, according to medical records, and in his teens spent time at a Manhattan group home for young people with behavioral problems. Between hospital stays he often lived with his mother, and for a while, she said, she could calm him when he was upset. When he was 19, though, they got into a vicious fight. After he started swearing at her, she said, she struck him. He punched her back, knocking out two teeth, grabbed a knife and tried to stab her, she said.
She called 911 and he was arrested, spending three months at Rikers.
When he was released, she refused to allow him back into the house, insisting that he complete a mental health program first.
For his part, Mr. Megginson said his mother was responsible for many of his problems. He complained that she had not been there for him and blamed her for refusing to put up the $5,000 to bail him out during his most recent incarceration.
“She says a lot of hurtful things, disrespectful things,” he said, “like ‘Oh I wish you wasn’t my son,’ or ‘I wish I got, you know, I almost got an abortion when you was born, I should’ve did it.’ ”
His mother disputed this, saying she was thrilled when she found out she was having a boy.
MR. MEGGINSON CAME OF AGE at a time when the public mental health system in New York was going through a major transformation.
By the 1960s and ’70s, state psychiatric hospitals were widely considered failures, inhumane places where patients were routinely neglected and abused. New medications had been developed that allowed patients to be stabilized and discharged, leading to widespread deinstitutionalization. But as the asylums were closed, the states provided little funding for community housing programs. The discharged patients often ended up homeless and, with their illness untreated, could become a danger to themselves and at times a risk to public safety.
On Jan. 3, 1999, Andrew Goldstein, a 29-year-old man with schizophrenia, was standing on a subway platform when he pushed a young woman, Kendra Webdale, in front of an N train, killing her instantly. When asked why he did it, he told the police, “I felt a sensation like something was entering me.”
Mr. Goldstein knew he was sick. He kept asking for help. But there were long waiting lists for supervised housing and case management services, and often he was only given a slip of paper with a clinic’s address. He is currently at a prison upstate, serving a 23-year sentence for manslaughter.
In the aftermath, legislators passed Kendra’s Law, which allows authorities to order people with a history of violence who have repeatedly rejected treatment to take their medication and report regularly to a state-designated program. The state also appropriated millions of dollars for community mental health services.
While the system still suffers from serious shortages, today there are 40,500 state-funded supervised beds where mentally ill people have regular access to clinicians, twice as many as 15 years ago.
One of the most significant innovations available to Mr. Megginson is the Assertive Community Treatment program, or ACT, which is made up of a team that includes a psychiatrist, nurses, social workers and a substance abuse counselor. It is their job to make sure that even the most troubled individuals stick with their treatment. The idea is to avoid costly hospitalizations while enabling people to live safely in the community.
The state requires an ACT team to have a caseload of no more than 68 people and to see each client at least six times a month. There are 46 such teams in New York City, 82 statewide.
On a recent Tuesday, seven members of an East Harlem-based ACT team, who work for a nonprofit agency called the Bridge, met for several hours to discuss each of their 68 clients. Among their concerns: a man with a history of suicide attempts whose cousin had recently killed himself; three people with addiction problems who needed to provide urine samples; a man who was being lewd; and a new client with a history of assault who was acting belligerent toward staff members. “He might need another mood stabilizer,” said Aneeza Ali, the team leader. “Or an attitude check.”
Starting when he was 18 and after numerous hospitalizations, Mr. Megginson was assigned at least twice to ACT teams including the Bridge program. After he assaulted his mother in 2009, he was mandated under Kendra’s Law to enroll with an ACT team as a condition of his probation.
His mother said her son seemed happier in the program because he could live on his own. “He always wanted to feel normal,” she said, adding, “It gave him a sense of ‘I’m O.K., I’m like everyone else.’ ”
ACT teams get high marks from activists. Susan Garrison, a social worker and a member of the Harlem chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness, said the program had made a big difference in her son’s life. At 45, despite having severe schizophrenia, he has been able to stay out of the hospital, and at times he has even held a job, including recently working seven hours a week at a Rite Aid in Harlem.
But as good as ACT is, Ms. Garrison said, her constant involvement in her son’s life has been crucial. Without an anchor — a parent, a spouse, a sibling — a person will often go off treatment and deteriorate, she said.
By the time Mr. Megginson reached his 20s, he had lost almost all contact with his mother and was mostly alone.
When his father was released from prison, they made an attempt to reconnect.
At one point, the father, also named Michael, found his son a job working for a storefront tax operation in Harlem. For $100 a week, he dressed in a Statue of Liberty costume and handed out fliers.
But in the fall of 2012, the two had a falling out. The son said his father stole his savings and lost it gambling. The father said he had permission to take the money.
Either way, that November, after a heated argument, the son pulled a chicken from the oven and hurled it at his father. He was committed soon after and remained hospitalized for the next five months.
IN RECENT YEARS, as jails and prisons have filled with the mentally ill, academics and clinicians have suggested that long-term hospitalization could be the best option for more individuals.
Observing a person during an extended hospitalization may improve a psychiatrist’s chances of establishing a reliable diagnosis. It can also provide a safe environment, in which a variety of medications and dosages can be calibrated to the patient’s needs.
In a hospital, Mr. Megginson would be compelled to take his medication, which would help curtail his aggression. At Rikers, clinicians say, inmates frequently go off their medication until they become uncontrollably violent.
Under state law, patients cannot be held against their will unless they are an immediate danger to themselves or others. During several hospitalizations, Mr. Megginson appeared before judges and successfully challenged his confinement. Though doctors disagreed, they had to release him.
His final hospital stay before Rikers lasted five months and ended on a hopeful note. A psychiatrist wrote that he was taking medication and attending substance abuse programs, that his grooming and hygiene had improved and that he was “free of psychotic features.”
“He was very proud of his accomplishment,” an April 22, 2013, progress note said, “and anxious to move on to independent living.”
But after being discharged to a housing program, Mr. Megginson deteriorated rapidly. He stopped attending treatment sessions, according to medical records, and started drinking heavily and abusing marijuana. On June 12, he hit a counselor in the face with a cellphone charger and was kicked out of the program. Two months later, he stole a woman’s cellphone and was sent to Rikers.
Several prosecutors, judges, police and correction officials said in interviews that they were frustrated by the lack of options for keeping people like Mr. Megginson out of jail.
Karen Friedman Agnifilo, the chief assistant district attorney in Manhattan, said she would like to have an alternative to jail for certain convicted offenders who are seriously mentally ill, such as a voluntary confinement that would provide treatment while keeping them off the streets.
“The problem is these individuals have typically been offered every service available,” Ms. Friedman Agnifilo said. “As a result, we have no choice but to continue to cycle them through the system. We wish we could do something else, but we don’t know what that something else is.”
At this point few, if any, alternatives exist for offenders.
The Manhattan district attorney’s office has joined several other prosecutors and judges in voicing support for a treatment model being proposed by Francis J. Greenburger, a Manhattan real estate developer whose mentally ill son is currently imprisoned. Under his plan, people with serious mental illness would plead guilty to certain felonies and avoid prison by agreeing to stay in a locked treatment center for up to two years. If at some point they failed to comply, they would be sent to prison.
For the last year and a half, Mr. Greenburger has been trying to get the state to license a pilot project, with limited progress.
AT RIKERS, MR. MEGGINSON became such a problem that at times he was transported in handcuffs and leg irons. He had to wear mittens to prevent him from grabbing things, and because he had a history of spitting at officers, was made to wear a mask.
In his 18 months in jail, he had 70 physical confrontations with officers, according to records, an extraordinary number given that most inmates never have one.
In nearly half the cases, guards used pepper spray to subdue him. Eleven times he was described in records as threatening to kill himself. The trouble often started when he ignored such routine orders from guards as to return to his cell, or to get out of the shower.
In the Rikers interview, he described how enraged it would make him to have no control over his daily life. He said it could turn a minor incident like being denied telephone privileges or getting cold food into a major frustration.
“I just get agitated and, you know, you can’t do anything about it because you behind a magnetically confined door,” Mr. Megginson said. “Mentally ill people should not be confined inside a box; it’s not healthy for the mind.”
“It makes us people we’re not,” he said.
Last year, Mr. Megginson was among a dozen particularly volatile inmates chosen for a new program run by the city’s health department. A case worker visited him three times a week for therapy sessions that included meditation, breathing exercises and conflict resolution strategies.
Martin J. Murphy, the Correction Department’s top uniformed officer, said the time spent working with Mr. Megginson and the inmates like him had resulted in a significant drop in the number of use-of-force cases involving them.
Correction officers, led by union leaders, have long called solitary confinement the most effective punishment for violent inmates. But Chief Murphy said in an interview that the intensive therapy had worked better.
Mr. Megginson spoke fondly of the therapist. He said she had taught him “just to use my thinking instead of using my fists. Like, if I get in an incident with an officer, instead of resolving it in a violent manner, rather just, you know, walk away sometimes. I try to think it out, think what I’m doing first and try to alleviate the situation.”
In the weeks before leaving Rikers, he sounded optimistic, saying he hoped to get a job in building maintenance. “I’m just a one-time felon,” he said, “and my felony is very light. If I had two felonies on my record or three, then it would be rough. I still got a chance. I believe in opportunity.”
Two months ago, Mr. Megginson pleaded guilty to stealing the cellphone as well as to the assaults on the officers. He was given a one-to-three-year prison sentence and, because of his time served at Rikers, was immediately eligible for parole.
On Feb. 18, he was transferred to Downstate Correctional Facility in Fishkill for what was supposed to be a short stay. He had a parole hearing scheduled for mid-March and his lawyer, Jane Pucher, had started looking for a therapeutic program for him in the city.
But at the prison, he was unable to hold himself together. On Feb. 26, he was disciplined for threatening to cut an officer, according to state prison records. On March 4 and 6, he got into fights with inmates, and on March 7 he was written up for smashing a table against a door.
Then on March 15, according to records, he defecated on his cell floor, smeared his feces on the window as well as a security camera and jumped on the metal bed frame until it broke off the wall. When guards arrived, he threw his feces at them.
A few days later, he was transferred to Central New York Psychiatric Center, a state maximum-security forensic hospital, located in Marcy.
In an interview there on Wednesday, Mr. Megginson said he had lost control in prison because he had stopped receiving his medication. Other inmates repeatedly picked on him, he said.
But in the last three weeks at the hospital, he said, things are going well: He is back on his medication, working out and planning to attend church on Sunday.
He said that this time, when he was released, things would be different.
“I’m not going to do nothing bad or illegal,” Mr. Megginson said.
Read the whole story
 
· · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·

9-Year-Old Girl Pregnant After Being Raped By Islamic State Group Militants

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A 9-year-old girl from a minority group in Iraq is pregnant after being raped by at least 10 different men with the Islamic State group, news reports said. She was seen by aid workers in a refugee camp in Iraq after she and hundreds of others were freed after being held captive by the group for more than eight months, the Daily Express reported
The girl was one of 216 people from the ethnic and religious minority community known as Yazidis released by the Islamic State group, which is also known as ISIS or ISIL. Those freed tended to be elderly, infirm or young, and many were in poor health, an Iraqi Kurdish commander said. They appeared to have been abused and neglected. Although the captives were freed Monday, they did not reach a Kurdish-controlled region of Iraq until Wednesday, Agence France-Presse reported.
"Even a cesarean section is dangerous," Yousif Daoud, an aid worker, said of the options for the 9-year-old girl to give birth, the Express reported. "The abuse she has suffered left her mentally and physically traumatized."
In August, when the Islamic State group launched an assault on Iraq's Yazidi community, its fighters kidnapped hundreds of Yazidi women and reportedly took them to Syria. A subsequent report by the U.S. State Department said 1,500 to 4,000 women had been abducted and that they were being raped, forced into marriage and tortured.
The group has since released a few hundred of those it abducted last year. In addition to those released this week, it also freed about 200 Yazidis, mainly weak or elderly ones, in January, the Associated Press reported. It was not clear why the group decided to release these prisoners en masse, but Kurdish military officials suggested that holding on to prisoners was slowing down the militants.
Yazidis are neither Muslim nor Christian but instead practice an ancient and unique faith. The Islamic State group still regards them as infidels.
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mikenova shared this story from ASHARQ AL-AWSAT. I tried to ignore US President Barack Obama’s interview with the New York Times because I was sure it would be part of his propaganda campaign for the framework nuclear deal with Ira...
» US liberal groups push congressional Democrats on Iran nuclear bills - Middle East
10/04/15 13:19 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story . US progressive groups rallied on Thursday to persuade Democratic senators not to support a bill giving Congress a vote on a nuclear deal with Iran, echoing the White House's insistence that the measure could ...
» White House Takes Shot At Netanyahu On Twitter Using Iran Bomb Diagram « CBS DC
10/04/15 13:19 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from CBS DC. Latest News WASHINGTON (CBS DC/AP) — The White House Twitter account took a shot at Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Wednesday, tweeting a cartoon bomb graphic nearly identical to...
» Obama’s doctrine and legacy | New York Amsterdam News: The new Black view
10/04/15 13:18 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Amsterdam News stories. Special to the AmNews If President Barack Obama’s intention is to forge a legacy, one mainly based on his foreign policy, he has made several decisive steps toward that goal. ...
» The White House's Netanyahu-trolling cartoon is pretty misleading
10/04/15 13:16 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Vox - All. The White House tweeted out a cartoon on Wednesday afternoon, defending the Iran nuclear framework agreement, that was unmistakably designed to mock Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. It...
» When Debating Iran's Nuclear Program, Sort Fact from Fiction | Scott Ritter
10/04/15 13:15 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from The Huffington Post | Full News Feed. American policy makers have made it a point, expressed consistently over time, to emphasize that intelligence estimates do not, in and of themselves, constitute policy...
» Poll Finds Most Americans Don't Trust Iran on Nuclear Deal - NBC News.com
10/04/15 13:15 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story . Poll Finds Most Americans Don't Trust Iran on Nuclear Deal collapse story Most Americans don't trust that Iran will abide by an eventual agreement to curtail its nuclear program and not develop an atomic weap...
» More than 100,000 fake Turkish passports given to ISIL
10/04/15 13:10 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story . Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant ( ISIL ) militants were given more than 100,000 fake Turkish passports in order to travel to Turkey and then enter Syria to join ISIL, a daily reported on Thursday. Accord...
» Obama Telephones Corker to Discuss Iran Nuke Agreement
10/04/15 13:10 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from ABC News: Politics. The White House says President Barack Obama and Sen. Bob Corker have discussed the tentative agreement to limit Iran's nuclear program. Corker, a Tennessee Republican and the Senate For...
» Should the U.S. guarantee safety in the Mideast?
10/04/15 13:09 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Should the U.S. guarantee safety in the Mideast? - Los Angeles Times. To the editor: Professor Steven L. Spiegel's idea of the U.S. entering into formal defense treaties with Israel, Saudi Arabia and other...
» Could the Corker-Menendez bill kill an Iran deal? A top Dem supporter pushes back.
10/04/15 13:09 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story . Virginia Senator Tim Kaine is among the most prominent Democratic supporters of the Corker-Menendez bill on Iran. He may be one of the most important players in determining whether it passes and what it ultim...
» White House swipes at Netanyahu with tweet of Iran bomb diagram
10/04/15 13:08 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story . Now Playing Amb. Gillerman: WH 'deteriorating' relationship with Israel The White House took an apparent swipe at Benjamin Netanyahu on Twitter Wednesday, posting a diagram similar to one used by the Israeli ...
» The Arab Reaction to the Iran Deal
10/04/15 13:07 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from From the Potomac to the Euphrates. Saudi King Salman attends the opening meeting of the Arab Summit in Sharm el-Sheikh (Stringer/Courtesy Reuters). My research associate, Amr Leheta, wrote this terrific po...
» Chertoff: Iran Deal Worthless Without the Right Enforcement Mechanisms | TIME
10/04/15 13:06 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story . Michael Chertoff was secretary of Homeland Security from 2005 to 2009. He is now executive chairman of The Chertoff Group, a global security and risk-management advisory firm. How will we enforce Iranian comp...
» 5 reasons Iran nuke deal fails: Column
10/04/15 13:05 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story . Kicking the nuclear can down the road while praying Iran changes doesn't offer much hope. A handout picture made available by the official website of the Iranian Supreme Leader shows the Supreme Leader, Ayato...
» Nuke deal 'fact sheets' vary between US, Iran, others
10/04/15 13:04 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story . Officials and pundits have repeatedly emphasized that the devil is in the details for an Iran nuclear deal, but there may also be demons in the basics. Key disagreements about what's been decided have emerged...
» A Struggle to Secure Iraq’s Shared Past, and Perhaps Its Future
10/04/15 13:02 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story . BAGHDAD — Looted and shuttered after American troops seized Baghdad a dozen years ago, the National Museum of Iraq has officially reopened its doors — a response to Islamic State thugs’ taki...
» Differences Emerge in U.S., Iran Interpretations of Nuclear Deal
10/04/15 13:01 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from U.S. News - News. By: Shahir Shahidsaless, Contributor for Al-Monitor Al-Monitor After eight days and nights of intense negotiations, on April 2 Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif and Federica M...
» Hundreds of bodies found in mass grave (raw)
10/04/15 12:59 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story . Hundreds of bodies found in mass grave (raw) Forensic teams examined and worked to remove hundreds of bodies found in a mass grave in Tikrit, Iraq. The victims are believed to be hundreds of soldiers killed b...
» Why is ISIS destroying Iraq’s cultural heritage? | Opinion , Commentary
10/04/15 12:58 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from The Daily Star >> Opinion. In recent months ISIS has taken to destroying priceless architecture and antiquities in northern Iraq. Since declaring a “caliphate” in June 2014 ISIS has targe...
» U.S. official: No timetable on Mosul invasion
10/04/15 12:56 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story . Story highlights U.S. official said in February that Iraqi troops could go into Mosul in April or May Officials say now that there's no timetable, an invasion could come sooner or later They note that recaptu...
» ISIS launches English radio
10/04/15 12:22 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story . DM London ISIS has launched English-language radio news bulletins on its Iraqi broadcast service - complete with information on the latest suicide bombings and ‘martyrdom operations’. The extremis...
» US to Tehran: Hands off Yemen
10/04/15 12:21 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story . ADEN: Washington warned Thursday it would not “stand by” while Iran supports rebels in Yemen, where a Saudi-led coalition hit anti-government targets at the start of a third week of bombings. In t...
» The Saudi concert | The Jakarta Post
10/04/15 12:20 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story . The war within a religion in the Afro-Arab world is set to intensify if Pakistan responds positively to Saudi Arabia’s appeal and joins the military offensive against the Shia militants in Yemen. While ...
» Tensions Between Iran and Saudi Arabia Deepen Over Conflict in Yemen
10/04/15 12:18 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story . CAIRO — Tensions between Iran and Saudi Arabia deepened on Thursday as Iranian leaders lashed out with rare vehemence against the continuing Saudi air campaign in Yemen , even hurling personal insults a...
» Obama’s Mindless Spin on Iran
10/04/15 12:18 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from The latest from The Weekly Standard by Jay Cost. Widget tooltip If one were to deny Barack Obama the use of straw-man attacks, misrepresentation of facts, accusations that opponents are operating in bad fa...
» It Begins: The Shaping and Selling of Obama's Legacy
10/04/15 12:16 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from RealClearPolitics - Articles. Perhaps it’s the field of potential and actual candidates who claim to want his job, or thoughts of a presidential library where two terms of Barack Obama history will g...
» Yazidi sex slaves 'gang-raped in public' by Isis fighters, harrowing accounts reveal - Middle East - World
10/04/15 12:15 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story . Hundreds of women and children were abducted from the town of Sinjar, in northern Iraq, and held hostage by Isis for over eight months. Some were sold to fighters as sex slaves or given as ‘prizes’...
» ISIS kills 52 men in Iraq
10/04/15 12:14 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from The Guardian Nigeria. ISIS killed 52 men, the majority Iraqi police officers,  at the al Qaim border crossing with Syria this week, according to Sohaib al Rawi, governor of Iraq’s Anbar province...
» The war against Islamic State (2): Mosul beckons
10/04/15 12:13 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story . Planting the Iraqi flag in Tikrit. But too many fight only for their sect IN A barren military camp near Mosul in Iraq, 500 balaclava-clad men train for urban warfare under the watchful eye of their leader, a...
» Iran is not cooperating with the deal
10/04/15 12:12 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from American Thinker. Like some of you, I had my doubts about all this talk of a deal with Iran.  First, I get very nervous when they cheer in the streets of Iran but worry in Israel.  Sorry, but I'd...
» Yazidi women 'gang-raped in public' by Isis fighters, harrowing accounts reveal
10/04/15 12:11 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Gulf News, News in Gulf, Latest Middle East News, Daily News | World News - Times of India. Yazidi women released by Isis this week were gang-raped in public by fighters and tortured by their captors, acco...
» ISIS: the mad, bloody residue of the war on terror
10/04/15 12:10 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Spiked. Key to the emergence of ISIS, in Cockburn’s telling, has been the civil war in Syria, a conflict that was rapidly transformed from a popular uprising against the brutal, economically struggli...
» JK Alternative Viewpoint » Blog Archive » The history of the Islamic State:rise of this Sunni terrorist group-STANLY JOHNY
10/04/15 12:08 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from JK Alternative Viewpoint. The veteran journalist Patrick Cockburn’s latest book traces the history of the Islamic State and identifies the reasons for the rise of this Sunni terrorist group. By STANL...
» Sweden to Join U.S.-Led Coalition Against ISIS
10/04/15 12:04 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Comments on: Sweden to Join U.S.-Led Coalition Against ISIS. by AFP 10 Apr 2015 0 (AFP) Sweden will send up to 120 troops to northern Iraq to train Iraqi and Kurdish fighters as part of the U.S.-led coalit...
» 10 doctors ‘shot dead’ after refusing to treat ISIS militants
10/04/15 12:04 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from | 10 doctors ‘shot dead’ after refusing to treat ISIS militantsNew York Post. Ten doctors who refused to treat wounded Islamic State militants faced a familiar punishment meted out by the terror group R...
» Who Is to Blame for the Rise of ISIS — Bush or Obama?
10/04/15 11:52 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Christianpost.com > Church & Ministries. March 19, 2015 | 3:49 pm (Photo: Reuters/Kevin Lamarque) U.S. President Barack Obama speaks at the White House Summit on Countering Violent Extremism in Wash...
» Obama Realigns American Foreign Policy
10/04/15 11:51 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from American Thinker. Foreign policy pundits are not quite sure about the Obama administration’s Middle East strategy. It appears that the administration is either playing a balance-of-power game in the ...
» Why Obama chose the Iran talks to take one of his presidency’s biggest risks
10/04/15 11:48 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story . A handout picture released by the White House on April 1, 2015 shows President Obama and Vice President Biden, with the national security team, participating in a secure video teleconference from the Situatio...
» Rand Paul: Kurds would fight ISIS 'like hell' if promised a country
10/04/15 11:46 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story . Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) says he supports creating a new nation for the Kurds in exchange for their help fighting the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS). “I think they would fight like hell if we prom...
» U.S. Advisers May Be Working With Terrorist-Labeled PKK to Fight ISIS - The Daily Beast
10/04/15 11:44 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story . The U.S. relationship is informal amid a tangled roster of Kurdish warriors, but the PKK troops are too good to ignore. MATARA, Iraq — On the volatile front lines facing the so-called Islamic State outs...
» China’s March Westward and the ISIS Challenge
10/04/15 11:41 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from International Policy Digest. By Aurangzeb Qureshi for Global Risk Insights In recent years, China is slowly returning to its former glory as the “Middle Kingdom” as it was once was during the 6...
» National View: InsideSources — Cyber security and the importance of investing and innovating - Opinion - southcoasttoday.com
10/04/15 11:39 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story . © Copyright 2015 Local Media Group, Inc. All Rights Reserved.    Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Service  |  Local Media Group Publications Original content available for n...
» Normalization and a De-facto Alliance Between Washington and Tehran | Raghida Dergham
10/04/15 11:35 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from WorldPost Blog on The Huffington Post. Within one week, this is what Tehran sowed and reaped: The Islamic Republic of Iran celebrated the opening of a new historical chapter with the United States and the ...
» ISIS 'demand $30m ransom for Assyrian hostages'
10/04/15 11:29 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story . Reuters Displaced Assyrians, who fled from the villages around Tel Tamr, gather outside an Assyrian Church in al-Hasaka city. More than 250 Assyrian hostages held by Islamic State could be released in return ...
» Russian warns of ISIS' influence in Russia | News , World
10/04/15 11:28 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from The Daily Star >> News. MOSCOW: A senior Russian intelligence official has warned of the potential influence of ISIS inside Russia. Gen. Sergei Smirnov, deputy chief of the FSB intelligence agency, w...
» US bombs ISIS in Saddam Hussein's hometown after Iran-backed offensive stalled
10/04/15 11:26 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Military & Defense Contributors. REUTERS/Stringer A military vehicle, belonging to Shi'ite fighters known as Hashid Shaabi, burns after being hit by Islamic State militants, during clashes in northern ...
» 2015-04-07#Playlist
10/04/15 11:03 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Mike Nova - Google+. 2015-04-07 #Playlist Recent Posts Review 2,578,7562,578,7562015-04-04#Playlist Tuesday April 7 th , 2015  at  11:55 PM Mike Nova - Google+ 1 Share 2,578,756 2,578,756 2015-04-04 #Playl...
» 2,594,4272,594,4272015-04-08 #Germanwings
10/04/15 11:03 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Mike Nova - Google+. 2,594,427 2,594,427 2015-04-08 #Germanwings "If authorities know what might have driven Mr. Lubitz, they have not made it public." - The Mind of Those Who Kill, and Kill Themselves - N...
» 2,600,1462,600,1462015-04-08 #Putin
10/04/15 11:03 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Mike Nova - Google+. 2,600,146 2,600,146 2015-04-08 #Putin #Tsipras #Greece Putin Meets With Alexis Tsipras of Greece, Raising Eyebrows in Europe - New York Times Putin Meets With Alexis Tsipras of Greece,...
» 2015-04-09"One Love" - but no singing "Kumbaya" Doctrine or Obama in Jamaica:
10/04/15 11:03 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Mike Nova - Google+. 2015-04-09 "One Love" - but no singing "Kumbaya" Doctrine or Obama in Jamaica: "Push it, push it some more..." Bob Marley - One Love Uploaded on Apr 20, 2010 One love, One heart Let's ...
» 2015-04-09#Obama
10/04/15 11:03 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Mike Nova - Google+. 2015-04-09 #Obama #Iran In Search of Obama Doctrine - My definition: Speak softly with your foreign opponents and smash the heads of your domestic ones with the Big Stick (e.g. as in M...
» 2015-04-08#Germanwings
10/04/15 11:03 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Mike Nova - Google+. 2015-04-08 #Germanwings "If authorities know what might have driven Mr. Lubitz, they have not made it public." - The Mind of Those Who Kill, and Kill Themselves - NYT "If authorities k...
» 2,600,1482,600,1482015-04-09#FoxNews
10/04/15 11:03 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Mike Nova - Google+. 2,600,148 2,600,148 2015-04-09 #FoxNews Cyber jihadists could target US TV stations, experts warn - Fox News | » Russian Defense Ministry Says No Cuts In Budget, Personnel 09/04/15 23:...
» 2,606,4152,606,4152015-04-09#Putin
10/04/15 11:03 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Mike Nova - Google+. 2,606,415 2,606,415 2015-04-09 #Putin #Ukraine New Russian Attack on Ukraine Likely as a Frozen Conflict Threatens Putin’s Goals and Interests, Felgengauer Says - by Paul Goble New Rus...
» US military commander: Russian military 'far more capable' than Soviet Union's - Fox News
10/04/15 02:34 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Russia - Google News. Fox News US military commander: Russian military 'far more capable' than Soviet Union's Fox News A top U.S. military commander warned that Russia's modern military is now “far more ca...
» Alexis Tsipras in Moscow asks Europe to end sanctions against Russia
10/04/15 02:34 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Russia | The Guardian. Greek leader’s ‘springtime for Russian-Greek relations’ fails to extend to bailout loans from Vladimir Putin, but he warns sanctions could cause ‘new cold war’ The Greek prime minist...
» Greek-Russian Summit Marks Defiance of EU - Wall Street Journal
10/04/15 02:34 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Russia - Google News. Wall Street Journal Greek- Russian Summit Marks Defiance of EU Wall Street Journal MOSCOW— Russian President Vladimir Putin and Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras met at a much-antic...
» Russia offers to loan Greece funds for infrastructure and transport works
10/04/15 02:33 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from - Europe RSS Feed. Russia would be willing to supply loans to Greece for major infrastructure and transport works, Russian President Vladimir Putin has said, as the Greek Prime Minister Alex Tsipras said E...
» How the US thinks Russians hacked the White House - CNN
10/04/15 02:33 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Russia - Google News. Bloomberg How the US thinks Russians hacked the White House CNN Washington (CNN) Russian hackers behind the damaging cyber intrusion of the State Department in recent months used that...
» US military tactics falling behind those of adversaries, Pentagon official warns
10/04/15 02:33 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Russia | The Guardian. Robert Work: ‘Our technological superiority is slipping. We see it every day’ Deputy defense secretary wants to bring US military into ‘post-insurgency era’ A “proliferation of preci...
» Порошенко с Коморовским нашли общий язык в вопросе санкций против России - УНИАН
10/04/15 02:33 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from В мире – Новости Google. УНИАН Порошенко с Коморовским нашли общий язык в вопросе санкций против России УНИАН Как передает корреспондент УНИАН, об этом заявил президент Украины Петр Порошенко во время совм...
» World Briefing: Spain: ‘Swindlers’? Roma Say No
10/04/15 02:32 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from NYT > Europe. Spanish groups representing Roma people began a campaign on Wednesday to remove a reference to the Roma as swindlers from the world’s benchmark Spanish dictionary.
» Russia To Europe Private Jet Flights Continue To Drop - Forbes
10/04/15 02:32 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Russia - Google News. Forbes Russia To Europe Private Jet Flights Continue To Drop Forbes Cold relations between the West and Russia are continuing to weigh down Europe's private aviation industry. The sam...
» Russia Cannot Become a Democracy in Its Current Borders, Walesa Says
10/04/15 02:31 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from The InterpreterThe Interpreter. Staunton, April 7 – Just as the notion of a liberal Soviet Union proved to be a contradiction in terms, so too the Russian Federation in its current borders cannot bec...
» As Russia Improves Its Surface-to-Air Missiles, US Looks To Counter - Defense One
10/04/15 02:31 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Russia - Google News. Defense One As Russia Improves Its Surface-to-Air Missiles, US Looks To Counter Defense One It's the latest move in a decades-old chess game between ever-stealthier U.S. aircraft and ...
» Ukraine Live Day 416: POWs Released After 8 Months, But Others Held as DNR Claims Freed
10/04/15 02:31 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from The InterpreterThe Interpreter. Yesterday’s live coverage of the Ukraine conflict can be found here . An archive of our liveblogs can be found here . For an overview and analysis of this developing story s...
» UN paid Russian air charters hundreds of millions while Putin invaded Ukraine - Fox News
10/04/15 02:30 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Russia - Google News. Fox News UN paid Russian air charters hundreds of millions while Putin invaded Ukraine Fox News Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks at a rally marking one year anniversary of anne...
» Islamic State Hacks French TV Station's Broadcasts, Websites
10/04/15 02:30 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty. The French television station TV5Monde says hackers claiming to belong to the Islamic State group had taken over its TV channels, websites, and social media pages.
» Russia's Round 2: A New Conflict in Eastern Europe? - U.S. News & World Report
10/04/15 02:30 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Russia - Google News. U.S. News & World Report Russia's Round 2: A New Conflict in Eastern Europe? U.S. News & World Report Russia's effective use over the last year of “little green men" – or forc...
» White House Won't Cite Hack Source Amid Reports Naming Russia
10/04/15 02:29 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty. The White House is declining to name the source of a hack to its unclassified e-mail system amid reports that it came from Russia.
» Russia Could Give Greece Advance for Turkish Stream Gas Pipeline - Sources
10/04/15 02:29 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from The Moscow Times Top Stories. Russia is considering soon giving Greece funds based on future profits it could earn from shipping Russian gas to Europe as part of a pipeline extension, two Greek government ...
» Kerry 'Very Concerned' About Iranian Support for Yemen Rebels
10/04/15 02:29 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Voice of America. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry says Washington is "very concerned" about at Iran's support for Shi'ite rebels in Yemen, after reports suggested an Iranian naval fleet was headed near ...
» Внутренние войска МВД России провели учения «Заслон-2015» - Коммерсантъ
10/04/15 02:28 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from В мире – Новости Google. Правда.Ру РИА Новости Внутренние войска МВД России провели учения «Заслон-2015» Коммерсантъ В Северо-Западном федеральном округе (СЗФО) прошли учения «Заслон-2015» подразделений вн...
» Amnesty: Evidence Of Summary Killings By Ukraine Rebels
10/04/15 02:28 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty. Amnesty International says it has new evidence of “execution-style killings” by pro-Russian separatists in eastern Ukraine.
» Passenger Train Crashes into Locomotive in Russia's Lipetsk Region
10/04/15 02:28 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from The Moscow Times Top Stories. At least 26 people have been injured after a passenger train traveling from Volgograd to Moscow crashed into a locomotive in Russia's Lipetsk region.
» Pentagon Chief: North Korea Missile Tests Reminder of Danger
10/04/15 02:27 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Voice of America. U.S. Defense Secretary Ashton Carter, who arrived in South Korea on Thursday, says Pyongyang's recent missiles tests are a reminder of how dangerous the situation is on the Korean peninsu...
» Polish President, In Rada, Pledges Support For Ukraine
10/04/15 02:27 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty. Polish President Bronislaw Komorowski has voiced strong support for Ukraine during a speech in the parliament in Kyiv, and urged other nations to back the country as its ...
» В Петербурге началась командно-штабная тренировка российских и белорусских офицеров - ГАZЕТА.СПБ
10/04/15 02:27 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from В мире – Новости Google. РИА Новости В Петербурге началась командно-штабная тренировка российских и белорусских офицеров ГАZЕТА.СПБ Российские и белорусские офицеры проводят в Петербурге специальные учения...
» Russian Troops Hold Drills Reportedly Modeled on Maidan Protests
10/04/15 02:26 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from The Moscow Times Top Stories. Russia's Interior Ministry troops are conducting large-scale exercises involving a "full arsenal" of anti-riot weapons to practice suppressing political protests.
» Russian Interior Ministry Forces Prepare to Counter Maidans across Russia and in Crimea
10/04/15 02:25 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Window on Eurasia -- New Series. Paul Goble               Staunton, April 9 – Russian internal troops are currently conducting exercises in six o...
» Колл-центры начали прием вопросов для "прямой линии" с Путиным - ИнфоРос
10/04/15 02:24 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from В мире – Новости Google. ИнфоРос Колл-центры начали прием вопросов для "прямой линии" с Путиным ИнфоРос Новый сайт российского президента работает без сбоев – сегодня он начал принимать вопросы р...
» Russian Olympic Athletes Denounce New Participation Proposal as 'Idiocy'
10/04/15 02:24 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from The Moscow Times Top Stories. Four-times Olympic swimming champion Vladimir Salnikov is completely against the idea of limiting Russian athletes to only being allowed to compete in two Olympics in a row, h...
» Рада запретила пропаганду коммунизма и нацизма на Украине - Радио Свобода
10/04/15 02:24 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from В мире – Новости Google. Радио Свобода Рада запретила пропаганду коммунизма и нацизма на Украине Радио Свобода Верховная Рада Украины в четверг приняла внесенный кабинетом министров законопроект внесённый ...
» Graveyard of emperors: Putin should heed the fates of Russia's leaders - Quartz
10/04/15 02:23 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Russia - Google News. Quartz Graveyard of emperors: Putin should heed the fates of Russia's leaders Quartz Russia , of course, denies the engagement, instead accusing the West of stirring protests in Kiev ...
» Russian Military Drills Continue With Su-35 Flight Training, Heavy Weapons ... - International Business Times
10/04/15 02:23 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Russia - Google News. International Business Times Russian Military Drills Continue With Su-35 Flight Training, Heavy Weapons ... International Business Times The Russian military mobilized more than 30 fi...
» US, Russian war games rekindle Cold War tensions in Eastern Europe amid ... - Fox News
10/04/15 02:23 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Russia - Google News. Fox News US, Russian war games rekindle Cold War tensions in Eastern Europe amid ... Fox News AMARI AIR BASE, Estonia – Russia is so close that the F-16 fighter pilots can see it on t...
» ‘Perfect Storm’ over Land May Push the North Caucasus into Chaos, Sokolov Says
10/04/15 02:23 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Window on Eurasia -- New Series. Paul Goble               Staunton, April 9 – The “Kavkazskaya politika” portal has launched a new series of arti...
» Interview: Amnesty International Says Separatists 'Executed' Captive Ukrainian Soldiers
10/04/15 02:22 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty. Amnesty International says "shocking new evidence" shows pro-Russian militants in eastern Ukraine have killed soldiers in their captivity execution-style.
» Russian Oil Floods Export Market as Teapot Refiners Lose Money - Bloomberg
10/04/15 02:22 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Russia - Google News. Bloomberg Russian Oil Floods Export Market as Teapot Refiners Lose Money Bloomberg A gas flare burns at the central processing plant for oil and gas in the Salym oilfields near Surgut...
» Amnesty Says Ukraine Rebels Killed Captive Soldiers
10/04/15 02:22 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Voice of America. Amnesty International said Thursday that it has evidence that Russian-backed separatists in east Ukraine have killed several captured government soldiers in gross violation of internation...
» French Broadcaster TV5 Monde Recovers After Hacking
10/04/15 02:21 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from NYT > Europe. A cyberattack by hackers claiming to support the Islamic State militant group had shut down transmission and wrested control of online accounts.
» Анти- и государственные СМИ
10/04/15 02:21 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Uploads by Радио Свобода. Анти- и государственные СМИ Роспечать заподозрена в финансировании «антигосударственных» изданий. Список «неблагонадежных» средств... From: Радио Свобода Views: 0 4 1 ratings Time...
» Порошенко приравнял Сталина к Гитлеру - Дни.Ру
10/04/15 02:21 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from В мире – Новости Google. Дни.Ру Порошенко приравнял Сталина к Гитлеру Дни.Ру 16:06 / 09.04.2015 Гитлер, День Победы, Порошенко, Сталин, УкраинаСтремясь любым способом противопоставить себя России, Украина ...
» Patriarchate Aide Pushing Émigré Solonevich’s Ideas about ‘a Peoples Monarchy’
10/04/15 02:21 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Window on Eurasia -- New Series. Paul Goble               Staunton, April 9 – Archpriest Vsevolod Chaplin, a close aide to Patriarch Kirill and t...
» New Russian Attack on Ukraine Likely as a Frozen Conflict Threatens Putin’s Goals and Interests, Felgengauer Says
10/04/15 02:17 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from The InterpreterThe Interpreter. Staunton, April 9 – Vladimir Putin’s goal in Ukraine remains regime change in Kyiv, something he had hoped his intervention in Crimea and Donbass would force the Ukrai...
» Russian troops practise quelling Ukrainian-style revolution
10/04/15 02:16 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Russian news, all the latest and breaking Russia news. Stones and bottles lobbed at interior ministry forces to mimic clashes in Kiev
» Из Молдавии депортировали еще одну группу российских журналистов - ИА REGNUM
10/04/15 02:15 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from В мире – Новости Google. Зеркало недели Из Молдавии депортировали еще одну группу российских журналистов ИА REGNUM МВД Молдавии отказало во въезде в страну съемочной группе российского телеканала «Звезда»....
» Russian Consumers Reflect the Pinch of Economic Sanctions - New York Times
10/04/15 02:15 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Russia - Google News. New York Times Russian Consumers Reflect the Pinch of Economic Sanctions New York Times MOSCOW — The brand-new Avia Park is a glittering testament to the power of the Russian consumer...
» Порошенко попросил у США помощи в вопросе обеспечения минских соглашений - Взгляд
10/04/15 02:14 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from В мире – Новости Google. Gazeta.ua Порошенко попросил у США помощи в вопросе обеспечения минских соглашений Взгляд Украина надеется на поддержку США в вопросах обеспечения выполнения минских договоренносте...
» В Нью-Йорке арестован еще один подозреваемый в поддержке ИГИЛ – гражданин Узбекистана
10/04/15 02:13 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Uploads by Голос Америки. В Нью-Йорке арестован еще один подозреваемый в поддержке ИГИЛ – гражданин Узбекистана Гражданин Узбекистана предстал перед федеральным судьей в Бруклине Originally published at - ...
» Пушков встретился с послом США Теффтом - Газета.Ru
10/04/15 02:13 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from В мире – Новости Google. Комсомольская правда Пушков встретился с послом США Теффтом Газета.Ru Глава международного комитета Госдумы Алексей Пушков встретился с послом США в России Джоном Теффтом, передает...
» Is the Iran Deal a Game Changer for Russia?
10/04/15 02:13 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Home - Institute of Modern Russia. On April 2, six world powers signed a tentative deal with Iran regarding its nuclear program. Should it be finalized in June, one of the outcomes of the deal will be the ...
» МИД ФРГ пригласил коллег «нормандской четверки» в Берлин - Белорусские новости
10/04/15 02:13 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from В мире – Новости Google. ЛІГА.net МИД ФРГ пригласил коллег «нормандской четверки» в Берлин Белорусские новости Министр иностранных дел Германии Франк-Вальтер Штайнмайер пригласил коллег по «нормандской чет...
» Продовольственная программа Михалковых
10/04/15 02:12 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Uploads by Радио Свобода. Продовольственная программа Михалковых О планах Никиты Михалкова и Андрона Кончаловского инвестировать 1 млрд рублей в дело вытеснения "Макдоналд... From: Радио Свобода Views: 772...
» Obama To Address Caribbean's 'Economic Achilles' Heel' -- Energy
10/04/15 02:11 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Latest From the Wilson Center. President Obama is in Jamaica on Thursday, meeting with Prime Minister Portia Simpson Miller and more than a dozen other leaders from throughout the Caribbean. It's the first...
» Ukrainian Town Cut off By Military Struggles to Survive
10/04/15 02:11 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Voice of America. In eastern Ukraine, villages cut off by military front lines are on the brink of a humanitarian crisis. Ukraine's Kyiv government can't seem to get supplies in supplies and pro-Russia sep...
» Putin returns Nazi-looted icon to Greek prime minister
10/04/15 02:10 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Russian news, all the latest and breaking Russia news. A greek icon stolen by German occupiers handed back to Alexis Tsipras in a sign of good will between countries
» Germanwings co-pilot Andreas Lubitz may have spiked captain's drink with diuretic to force him from cabin
10/04/15 02:10 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from - Europe RSS Feed. Investigators probing last month’s Germanwings crash are trying to determine whether the Andreas Lubitz placed a chemical in the captain’s drink to force him to go to the toilet.
» Nordic nations agree on defense cooperation against Russia - Reuters
10/04/15 02:09 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Russia - Google News. Nordic nations agree on defense cooperation against Russia Reuters " Russia's leaders have shown that they are prepared to make practical and effective use of military means in o...
» Молния пробила дыру в самолете исландской авиакомпании во время полета - Интерфакс
10/04/15 02:09 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from В мире – Новости Google. Полит.ру Молния пробила дыру в самолете исландской авиакомпании во время полета Интерфакс ЛОНДОН. 9 АПРЕЛЯ. ИНТЕРФАКС — Молния попала в нос самолета Boeing 757 исландской авиакомпа...
» Министр обороны Словении отправлен в отставку - Коммерсантъ
10/04/15 02:09 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from В мире – Новости Google. Полит.ру Российская Газета Министр обороны Словении отправлен в отставку Коммерсантъ Парламент Словении в среду отправил министра обороны страны Янко Вебера в отставку. Как сообщае...
» Nordic nations agree on defense cooperation against Russia - Yahoo News
10/04/15 02:09 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Russia - Google News. Newsweek Nordic nations agree on defense cooperation against Russia Yahoo News " Russia's leaders have shown that they are prepared to make practical and effective use of military mea...
» Temples Weigh India's Call to Deposit Gold, Earn Interest
10/04/15 02:09 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Voice of America. The two-century-old Shree Siddhivinayak temple in Mumbai, devoted to the Hindu elephant-headed god Ganesha, bristles with closed-circuit cameras and is guarded by 65 security officers. It...
» Nordic Nations Agree on Closer Defense Cooperation Against Russia - Newsweek
10/04/15 02:08 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Russia - Google News. Newsweek Nordic Nations Agree on Closer Defense Cooperation Against Russia Newsweek A Swedish Navy fast-attack craft skims the water around the Stockholm archipelago, in Sweden, Octob...
» На Украине возобновлено старое уголовное дело против Игоря Коломойского - Коммерсантъ
10/04/15 02:08 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from В мире – Новости Google. Комсомольская Правда в Украине На Украине возобновлено старое уголовное дело против Игоря Коломойского Коммерсантъ Генеральная прокуратура Украины возобновила расследование уголовн...
» ДНР: Армия Украины начала танковый прорыв под Донецком - Московский комсомолец
10/04/15 02:07 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from В мире – Новости Google. Московский комсомолец ДНР: Армия Украины начала танковый прорыв под Донецком Московский комсомолец О том, что вооруженные силы Украины начали мощный танковый обстрел позиций ополче...
» Владимир Путин изобличил виновных в кровавой драме на Украине - SoftСraze: актуально и обьективно
10/04/15 02:07 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from В мире – Новости Google. SoftСraze: актуально и обьективно Владимир Путин изобличил виновных в кровавой драме на Украине SoftСraze: актуально и обьективно Российская Федерация, как и ранее, выступает решит...
» World Briefing: Italy: Man Kills 3 at Court During Bankruptcy Hearing
10/04/15 02:07 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from NYT > Europe. A man at a hearing in a fraudulent bankruptcy opened fire in a Milan courthouse on Thursday, killing a judge, a lawyer and a co-defendant and wounding at least two others.
» NATO Caps Size of Russia's Mission After Internal Reports of Espionage - New York Times
10/04/15 01:31 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Russia - Google News. Reuters NATO Caps Size of Russia's Mission After Internal Reports of Espionage New York Times WASHINGTON — For a year after the North Atlantic Treaty Organization cut back its coopera...
» Obama Set to Engage Cubans in Panama
10/04/15 01:31 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Voice of America. President Barack Obama has arrived in Panama for a summit at which he is expected to have a historic encounter with Cuban leader Raul Castro. President Obama arrived in the Panamanian cap...
» I killed 15 prisoners of war in Ukraine, claims Russian fighter
10/04/15 01:30 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Russia | The Guardian. Head of separatist Sparta Battalion says he shot prisoners following the battle for Donetsk airport, prompting war crimes investigation by Ukrainian government. The Kyiv Post reports...
» Secret service supervisor put on leave after accusations of assault
10/04/15 01:30 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Network Front | The Guardian. Female employee claims Female employee says senior supervisor Xavier Morales assaulted her after work at the agency’s headquarters The US secret service has put a manager on a...
» Secret Service Supervisor On Leave After Assault Allegation - FOX News Radio
10/04/15 01:30 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Top Stories - Google News. FOX News Radio Secret Service Supervisor On Leave After Assault Allegation FOX News Radio A female Secret Service agent claims her boss, Xavier Morales, assaulted her after a par...
» Turkmen Embassy In Minsk Hacked Apparently By IS
10/04/15 01:29 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty. Turkmenistan's embassy in the Belarusian capital, Turkmenistan's Embassy in Belarusian capital -- Minsk, has been hacked by people with apparent links to the Islamic Stat...
» U.S. man accused of trying to support to Islamic State
10/04/15 01:29 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Reuters: World News. WASHINGTON (Reuters) - An American man has been charged with trying to provide support for the Islamic State militant group, the U.S Justice Department said on Thursday.
» ISIS stone man to death for bestiality while 'Assad spy' has his throat slit
10/04/15 01:29 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from News | Mail Online. Graphic photos show a man being bombarded with rocks in a remote stretch of Homs province in front of crowds of bloodthirsty onlookers after being accused of having 'sex with animals'.
» Ukraine sets sights on joining NATO
10/04/15 01:28 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Reuters: World News. KIEV (Reuters) - Ukraine, locked in conflict with Russian-backed separatists in its east, on Thursday drew up a new security doctrine denouncing Russia's "aggression" and setting its s...
» 'King of Diamonds' named among Hatton Garden heist suspects
10/04/15 01:28 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from News | Mail Online. The mysterious Panama hat-wearing robber was pictured by CCTV when he took part in a previous £13million robbery at a Graff diamond store in Knightsbridge, west London in 2007
» What Would a World Without Language Barriers Look Like? - The Atlantic
10/04/15 01:28 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from world - Google News. The Atlantic What Would a World Without Language Barriers Look Like? The Atlantic On its website, in its promotional videos, and at live events, the company has been dwelling on what t...
» Woman may have faked link to victim of Germanwings crash for free flights
10/04/15 01:28 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Network Front | The Guardian. German police investigating whether woman falsely claimed to be cousin of one of the teachers killed in plane crash last month German police are looking into whether a woman f...
» Trident is today's hot-button issue – even for apprentices in Nottingham
10/04/15 01:27 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Network Front | The Guardian. If you’re in the audience at a campaign event, there may be times when you sense that the prime minister is talking over your head “It can be a bit baffling, elections,” expla...
» HSBC files: France expands investigation to include global holding company
10/04/15 01:27 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Network Front | The Guardian. French prosecutors widen inquiry after receiving file on alleged tax-related offences of HSBC’s Swiss banking subsidiary French prosecutors have expanded their investigations ...
» Khamenei: Iran Nuclear Deal With West Not Final - Voice of America
10/04/15 01:27 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Top Stories - Google News. Voice of America Khamenei: Iran Nuclear Deal With West Not Final Voice of America Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei demanded Western and U.N. economic sanctions impos...
» Russia's Missing Article: Censorship, Prudence, Or A Win For Moscow's Troll Army?
10/04/15 01:23 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty. A newspaper in the Russian region of Buryatia excised an article about a local soldier who was allegedly severely injured while fighting for the separatists in eastern Uk...
» U.S. Cannot Be Trusted, Iran’s Supreme Leader Says
10/04/15 01:21 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from TIME. Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatullah Ayatollah Khamenei warned Iranian diplomats on Thursday not to trust the United States as they try to finalize finalise the nuclear agreement that was reached in Lausa...
» Judge in Aaron Hernandez's murder trial warns of mistrial risk - Reuters
10/04/15 01:11 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Top Stories - Google News. Reuters Judge in Aaron Hernandez's murder trial warns of mistrial risk Reuters FALL RIVER, Mass. (Reuters) - The judge in former New England Patriots star Aaron Hernandez's murde...
» Exclusive: Shipping lines pull back from Yemen as conflict escalates
10/04/15 01:10 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Reuters: World News. LONDON (Reuters) - International shipping lines are being forced to scale back or suspend port calls to Yemen as the conflict gets worse, putting pressure on supplies of food as prices...
» Putin Orders Millions Of Troops To High Alert After US Hypercraft “Attack”
10/04/15 00:01 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from The European Union Times - World News, Breaking News. The Ministry of Defense ( MoD ) (MoD) in an “urgent action bulletin” published today states that President Putin has ordered over 3 million regular and...
» Ayatollah Ali Khamenei: I neither support nor oppose nuclear deal - video
09/04/15 23:59 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from World news + Video | The Guardian. Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, says on Thursday that he neither supports, nor opposes, the nuclear deal between the P5+1 and Iran on the grounds that noth...
» Obama’s Jamaica visit part of wider outreach to Caribbean region
09/04/15 23:59 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from World: World News, International News, Foreign Reporting - The Washington Post. KINGSTON, Jamaica — President KINGSTON, Jamaica—President Obama, launching an effort to reassert close U.S. ties with the Uni...
» US Man Accused of Trying to Join IS Group
09/04/15 23:58 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Voice of America. An American man traveled to the Middle East in a failed attempt to join the Islamic State group, federal authorities said Thursday. Joshua Van Haften, 34, was arrested Wednesday night at ...
» Wisconsin man accused of trying to join Islamic State group
09/04/15 23:58 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from AP Top Headlines At 10:30 p.m. EDT. MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- A Wisconsin man accused of traveling to the Middle East in a failed attempt to join the Islamic State has been ordered held without bond....
» CSTO Meets In Tajikistan To Discuss IS Threat
09/04/15 23:58 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty. Members of the Collective Security Treaty Organization (CSTO) have met in Tajikistan to discuss the threat posed by the rise of the Islamic State (IS) group in Afghanistan.
» WorldViews: Why Latin America makes a point of not toeing the Washington line
09/04/15 23:47 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from World: World News, International News, Foreign Reporting - The Washington Post. PANAMA CITY-- When the Summit of the Americas gets underway here Friday, U.S. officials hoping for a warm reception may be qu...
» French TV Station Hacked
09/04/15 23:47 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from WSJ.com: World News. French broadcaster TV5Monde is working to get its systems back on track after an “extremely powerful” cyberattack by hackers claiming allegiance to Islamic State knocked the company’s ...
» Ayatollah says US distorting nuclear deal
09/04/15 23:47 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from World News. Supreme leader insists sanctions be lifted ‘on the first day’
» Newly knighted Michael Bloomberg denies he wants to be mayor of London
09/04/15 23:46 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Network Front | The Guardian. Anglophile former mayor of New York insists he has ‘zero chance’ and ‘zero interest’ in succeeding Boris Johnson Michael Bloomberg, the former mayor of New York, has denied ru...
» Obama says decision soon on Cuba as state sponsor of terror
09/04/15 23:46 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from AP Top Headlines At 10:30 p.m. EDT. KINGSTON, Jamaica (AP) -- President Barack Obama says he'll decide soon whether to remove Cuba from the U.S. list of state sponsors of terrorism....
» Obama: no decision yet on removing Cuba from terror sponsor list
09/04/15 23:46 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Reuters: World News. KINGSTON, JAMAICA (Reuters) - President Barack Obama said on Thursday that the U.S. State Department had completed its review of whether to remove Cuba from the list of countries that ...
» WorldViews: If two Russian filmmakers have it their way, it could mean the end of McDonald’s in Russia
09/04/15 23:19 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from World: World News, International News, Foreign Reporting - The Washington Post. MOSCOW — A pair of internationally-renowned film-director brothers have a strategy to save Russia from the scourge of America...
» Russian Defense Ministry Says No Cuts In Budget, Personnel
09/04/15 23:18 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty. Russia's Deputy Defense Minister Tatyana Shevtsova said April 9 there would be no reductions of personnel or funding for the Defense Ministry
» News Analysis: Ahead of World War II Anniversary, Questions Linger Over Stance of Japan’s Premier
09/04/15 23:18 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from NYT > World. While Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has expressed remorse for the war, suspicions that he remains an unrepentant revisionist have kept Japan from a more assertive regional role.
» WorldViews: Is the New Generation becoming the most powerful cartel in Mexico?
09/04/15 23:18 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from World: World News, International News, Foreign Reporting - The Washington Post. MEXICO CITY -- There's a new name to worry about in Mexico's ever-churning drug war.They call themselves the New Generation o...
» Iran's Supreme Leader Says Sanctions Must Lift When Nuclear Deal Is Signed - New York Times
09/04/15 23:18 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Top Stories - Google News. New York Times Iran's Supreme Leader Says Sanctions Must Lift When Nuclear Deal Is Signed New York Times TEHRAN — Iran's supreme leader on Thursday challenged two of the United S...
» AP investigation details perimeter breaches at US airports
09/04/15 23:17 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from AP Top Headlines At 9:21 p.m. EDT. Several hundred times over the last decade, intruders have hopped fences, slipped past guardhouses, crashed their cars through gates or otherwise breached perimeter secur...
» Germanwings Data Recorder May Hold Few Clues on Cockpit Door
09/04/15 23:17 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from WSJ.com: World News. Investigators probing the crash of Germanwings Flight 9525 may face barriers in reconstructing conclusively what actions the co-pilot may have taken to keep others out of the cockpit.
» Thieves drilled into vault in London jewelry district heist - Fox News
09/04/15 23:17 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Top Stories - Google News. Fox News Thieves drilled into vault in London jewelry district heist Fox News April 9, 2015: Detective Chief Inspector Paul Johnson of the Metropolitan police Flying Squad speaks...
» Opinion: Iran Advances Beyond 'Third Tier' Cyber Power
09/04/15 23:17 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Voice of America. Even as Iran has applied the brakes to its nuclear program over the past 18 months and provisionally agreed last week to a deal lasting more than a decade, it has continued to advance its...
» Obama to Decide Soon on Removing Cuba From Terrorism List
09/04/15 23:16 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from WSJ.com: World News. President Barack Obama said the State Department has completed its review of whether to remove Cuba from the U.S. list of governments that sponsor terrorism, and his decision may come ...
» Real estate heir Durst pleads not guilty to firearm charges - Beloit Daily News
09/04/15 23:16 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Top Stories - Google News. Real estate heir Durst pleads not guilty to firearm charges Beloit Daily News NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Millionaire real estate heir Robert Durst, wanted in California on a murder charg...
» Iran aims high ahead of push for final nuclear deal
09/04/15 23:16 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from AP Top Headlines At 9:21 p.m. EDT. TEHRAN, Iran (AP) -- Iran is staking out a tough bargaining stance for the final phase of nuclear negotiations, with both its supreme leader and its moderate president sa...
» Secret Service suspends supervisor after assault accusation - New York Post
09/04/15 23:15 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Top Stories - Google News. New York Post Secret Service suspends supervisor after assault accusation New York Post The U.S. Secret Service has put a senior supervisor on leave and suspended his security cl...
» Belgian king's brother likens kin to the Stasi
09/04/15 23:15 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Network Front | The Guardian. Prince Laurent, brother of King Philippe, says own royal family have ‘sabotaged and blocked’ his career over years Prince Laurent, brother to Belgium’s King Philippe, has atta...
» Russia Tempts Greece With Improved Trade, But Offers No Aid
09/04/15 23:14 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Uploads by VOA News. Russia Tempts Greece With Improved Trade, But Offers No Aid With Greece locked into tough negotiations with its European creditors, the visit to Moscow by Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras...
» Russian Consumers Reflect the Pinch of Economic Sanctions
09/04/15 23:14 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from NYT > World. The brand-new Avia Park mall in Moscow has 377,000 square feet of gleaming enclosed space. What it needs, badly, is stores and customers to fill it. Moscow's Avia Park mall, Europe's larges...
» Rare black flamingo spotted in Cyprus
09/04/15 23:14 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Uploads by ODN. Rare black flamingo spotted in Cyprus An extremely rare black flamingo has been spotted on the Mediterranean island of Cyprus. Report by Andrea Lilly. From: ODN Views: 78 6 0 0 ratings Time...
» Islamic State brought Iraq leaders together in common fight: Biden
09/04/15 23:14 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Reuters: World News. WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Islamic State brought Iraqi leaders together in a common fight since the militant group declared a "caliphate" in northern Iraq last summer, U.S. Vice Presid...
» Russia Considers Taking North Korean Migrant Laborers
09/04/15 23:13 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty. Russian Deputy Minister of Science and Education Veniamin Kaganov said testing centers could be opened for North Koreans seeking to work in Russia
» Taliban Attack in Northern Afghanistan Leaves at Least 10 Dead
09/04/15 23:13 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from NYT > World. In a city known as a model of stability, the Taliban attacked a local prosecutor’s office where militants were disguised as Afghan security personnel.
» Snap back? Not so fast. Sanctions a big issue in nuke talks
09/04/15 23:13 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from AP Top Headlines At 9:21 p.m. EDT. WASHINGTON (AP) -- Snap back? Not so fast....
» Russians protest as public mood swings
09/04/15 23:12 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from World News. Increase in unrest in recent months illustrates underlying volatility
» Obama hints at Cuba breakthrough as he flies south for Raúl Castro meeting
09/04/15 23:12 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Network Front | The Guardian. President set to remove Cuba from the US list of state sponsors of terrorism as he prepares for face-to-face encounter with Castro at Panama summit Barack Obama is poised to r...
» Ukraine Bans Soviet-Era Symbols
09/04/15 23:12 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from WSJ.com: World News. Parliament voted to ban Soviet as well as Nazi symbols here, a move that reinforced Ukraine’s recent pivot away from Moscow but raised the prospect of exacerbating the country’s divisi...
» Biden: IS Momentum In Iraq Has 'Halted'
09/04/15 23:11 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty. U.S. Vice President Joe Biden has said the momentum of Islamic State (IS) militants in Iraq has stalled.
» Italian right-wing leader says Facebook blocks his personal page
09/04/15 23:11 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Reuters: World News. ROME (Reuters) - Matteo Salvini, leader of Italy's anti-immigration Northern League party, said on Thursday Facebook had blocked his personal page for 24 hours because he used the word...
» Iran Leader Lashes Out at Saudi Arabia's Intervention in Yemen
09/04/15 23:10 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from WSJ.com: World News. Iran’s Ayatollah Ali Khamenei warns Riyadh that the kingdom’s offensive against Yemen’s Houthi rebels would end in military defeat in his strongest comments on the conflict to date.
» Biden Cites Progress in Iraq’s War With ISIS
09/04/15 23:10 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from NYT > World. In a speech, Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. said Iraq had halted the momentum of Islamic State fighters with help from the United States and regional allies.
» Iran's Khamenei says no guarantee of nuclear deal - YouTube
09/04/15 23:09 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story . Published on Apr 9, 2015 Keep up-to-date with the latest news, subscribe here: http://bit.ly/AFP-subscribe A framework nuclear deal reached with world powers last week is no guarantee a full agreement will be...
» Iran's Khamenei says no guarantee of nuclear deal
09/04/15 23:07 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Uploads by AFP news agency. Iran's Khamenei says no guarantee of nuclear deal Keep up-to-date with the latest news, subscribe here: http://bit.ly/AFP-subscribe A framework nuclear deal reached with world p...
» Ukraine opens gas sector to investors
09/04/15 23:06 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from World News. Parliament shows determination to break longstanding power of oligarchs
» U.S., allies conduct 7 air strikes in Syria, 12 in Iraq: military
09/04/15 23:06 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Reuters: World News. WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S.-led forces targeted Islamic State militants in Syria with seven air strikes from Wednesday to Thursday morning, with Canada taking part in the strikes for t...
» Robert Durst sends bizarre letter to reporter - New York Post
09/04/15 23:06 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Top Stories - Google News. New York Post Robert Durst sends bizarre letter to reporter New York Post Robert Durst is transported to prison after his arraignment in New Orleans on March 17. Photo: AP. MORE ...
» Biden: Islamic State Assault Was Catalyst for Iraqi Unity
09/04/15 23:06 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Voice of America. The Islamic State's assault on northern Iraq last summer galvanized the country's rival factions to fight a common enemy and halt the militant group's momentum, U.S. Vice President Joe Bi...
» France's National Front's Le Pen tells father to step down from politics
09/04/15 23:06 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Reuters: World News. PARIS (Reuters) - France's National Front leader Marine Le Pen urged her father Jean-Marie to withdraw from political life and said she would begin disciplinary proceedings against him...
» Historic encounter with Cuba's Castro awaits Obama in Panama
09/04/15 23:05 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from AP Top Headlines At 9:21 p.m. EDT. PANAMA CITY (AP) -- Turning the page on a half-century of enmity, President Barack Obama signaled Thursday he will soon remove Cuba from the U.S. list of state sponsors o...
» London police probe massive '$300 mn' jewel heist
09/04/15 23:05 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Uploads by AFP news agency. London police probe massive '$300 mn' jewel heist Keep up-to-date with the latest news, subscribe here: http://bit.ly/AFP-subscribe Thieves may have gotten away with a record ha...
» India's rich temples may open gold vaults for PM Modi
09/04/15 23:04 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Reuters: World News. MUMBAI/NEW DELHI (Reuters) - The two-century-old Shree Siddhivinayak temple in Mumbai devoted to the Hindu elephant-headed god Ganesha bristles with close circuit cameras and is guarde...
» Why is ISIS destroying Iraq's cultural heritage? - The Daily Star
09/04/15 23:04 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from World - Google News. Why is ISIS destroying Iraq's cultural heritage? The Daily Star In recent months ISIS has taken to destroying priceless architecture and antiquities in northern Iraq. Since declaring a...
» Poland's Komorowski in Kiez to show support for Ukraine - YouTube
09/04/15 23:03 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story . Published on Apr 9, 2015 Keep up-to-date with the latest news, subscribe here: http://bit.ly/AFP-subscribe Ukrainian soldiers fighting pro-Russian separatists in east Ukraine are also fighting to ensure the s...
» Poland's Komorowski in Kiez to show support for Ukraine
09/04/15 23:02 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Uploads by AFP news agency. Poland's Komorowski in Kiez to show support for Ukraine Keep up-to-date with the latest news, subscribe here: http://bit.ly/AFP-subscribe Ukrainian soldiers fighting pro-Russian...
» Obama administration speaks out against LGBT 'conversion therapy' as Ontario ... - National Post
09/04/15 23:01 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Top Stories - Google News. National Post Obama administration speaks out against LGBT 'conversion therapy' as Ontario ... National Post U.S. President Barack Obama has added his voice to the growing chorus...
» How Obama Is Readying the Way to Meet Castro
09/04/15 22:54 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from TIME. The United States is not hosting the Summit of the Americas; the meeting of Organization of American States members convenes on Friday in Panama City. But the Obama administration has spent the days ...
» U.S. State Dept. recommends removing Cuba from terrorism list: Senate source
09/04/15 22:54 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Reuters: World News. WASHINGTON/KINGSTON, Jamaica (Reuters) - The U.S. State Department has recommended that President Barack Obama remove Cuba from the U.S. list of state sponsors of terrorism, a U.S. Sen...
» Ukraine’s Parliament Moves to Shore Up Battered Economy
09/04/15 22:54 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from NYT > World. A series of legislative votes came as new evidence emerged of just how badly the business sector has been shattered in the last year.
» Why Obama might not get expected glow at Americas summit (+video)
09/04/15 22:30 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Christian Science Monitor | USA. Washington — President Obama's trip to Panama Friday for his third Summit of the Americas was once expected to be a victory lap over his move to normalize r...
» Obama set to test engagement doctrine with Cuba
09/04/15 19:02 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story . Washington (CNN) Emboldened after striking a preliminary nuclear deal with Iran, President Barack Obama heads to a gathering of South and Central American leaders this week prepared to test his doctrine of en...
» Obama’s Moral Equivalence Ignores Islamic Doctrine
09/04/15 17:08 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from The Counter Jihad Report. PJ Media , By Andrew C. McCarthy On February 6, 2015 The insipid moral equivalence in President Obama’s apologia for Islam at the National Prayer Breakfast Thursday morning ...
» Decoding the Obama Doctrine
09/04/15 16:38 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story . It’s simple: Warm relations with adversaries, and cool them with friends. J ames Jeffrey , Barack Obama’s former ambassador extraordinary and plenipotentiary to Iraq, has this to say about the adm...
» Obama's National Security Strategy Show's He's a Post-Strategic President
09/04/15 15:51 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from U.S. News - World Report. The coffin is quickly being lowered on President Barack Obama’s most recent National Security Strategy. It arrived with little fanfare, received almost no attention from the...
» Nuclear non-proliferation: A nuclear test for the Obama doctrine
09/04/15 13:53 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story . BARACK OBAMA came to office with a simple message for his country’s foes: “We will extend a hand if you are willing to unclench your fist.” He has done a lot of handshaking—with Myanma...
» The Incredible Obama Doctrine - WSJ
09/04/15 13:12 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story . Last weekend, with the ink on the Iran nuclear deal still being deciphered, the Obama Doctrine fell out of an interview between President Obama and Thomas Friedman of the New York Times . “You asked abo...
» White House Seeks to Soothe Relations With Venezuela
09/04/15 13:05 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story . BOGOTÁ, Colombia — A White House official said Tuesday that Venezuela was not a threat to the national security of the United States, backing off language in an executive order that had inflamed re...
» Obama on Iran and His View of the World - Video
09/04/15 13:04 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story . BY A.J. Chavar, Quynhanh Do, David Frank, Abe Sater and Ben Werschkul | Apr. 5, 2015 | 46:14 In an interview with Thomas L. Friedman, President Obama says that his policy of engagement in Iran and elsewhere d...
» Jewels 'worth millions' stolen from London's diamond district - YouTube
09/04/15 13:00 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story . Published on Apr 8, 2015 A London jeweller said there was a "big chance" that diamonds worth millions of euros were snatched by thieves from a vault in the city over the weekend. Muhammad Almaf said he was no...
» French government vows to hunt down hackers who targeted TV station - YouTube
09/04/15 12:58 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story . Published on Apr 9, 2015 The French government is promising to hunt down "hackers": http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015... who knocked out channels belonging to a French TV station and posted material on it...
» Obama Takes His Hopes for Cuba to Summit Meeting
09/04/15 12:14 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story . WASHINGTON — President Obama ’s push for a historic opening with Cuba faces its first major test this week as he travels to a summit meeting in Latin America, where he hopes to highlight momentum ...
» Obama, in Jamaica, Seeks to Reassert U.S. Influence in Caribbean
09/04/15 11:14 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story . KINGSTON, Jamaica — President Obama is expected to use a meeting of Caribbean nations on Thursday to try to reassert American influence in the region and press its leaders to pursue alternative energy s...
» Two Israeli Soldiers Injured In Stabbing
08/04/15 20:59 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story . Two Israeli soldiers have been injured in a stabbing near a settlement in the West Bank, with the attacker killed shortly afterwards, the Israeli army has said. An army spokeswoman said: "There was a stabbing...
» Israeli Soldier 'Badly Hurt' In Stabbing
08/04/15 20:58 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from World News - Breaking international news and headlines | Sky News. An Israeli soldier has been "badly hurt" in a stabbing and the attacker has been killed, a security source has told AFP.
» China sentences former mayor to 15 years for graft - U-T San Diego
08/04/15 20:57 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from World - Google News. Channel News Asia China sentences former mayor to 15 years for graft U-T San Diego BEIJING (AP) — A former mayor of the major eastern Chinese city of Nanjing has been sentenced to 15 y...
» Prison Guards 'Staged Gladiator-Style Fight'
08/04/15 20:53 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from World News - Breaking international news and headlines | Sky News. Two inmates were brought together in a section where they were supposed to be segregated - before one was killed, it is claimed.
» White House System Hacked By Russians - Report
08/04/15 20:52 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from World News - Breaking international news and headlines | Sky News. Russian government-backed hackers reportedly accessed confidential details about Barack Obama's schedule last October.
» Russian suspect says ex-spy Litvinenko's death was an accident
08/04/15 20:50 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Reuters: World News. MOSCOW (Reuters) - One of two Russians accused of poisoning ex-Soviet spy Alexander Litvinenko in London in 2006 said on Wednesday the former KGB officer may have killed himself accide...
» Alexander Litvinenko may have killed himself accidentally, accused says
08/04/15 20:49 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Network Front | The Guardian. One of two One of the Russians accused of poisoning says the former Soviet spy was exposed to says he had been exposed to radioactive polonium before their meeting One of two ...
» Putin Holds Talks With Greek PM Tsipras
08/04/15 20:49 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
mikenova shared this story from Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty. ​Russian President Vladimir Putin is holding talks with Greece's prime minister in Moscow in an effort to boost bilateral economic cooperation, investment, and trade rela...