Sunday, March 1, 2015

"It is clear that it was a very sophisticated and professional killing," said Andrey Soldatov, a Russian security expert. Up to 15 people working in three teams could have been involved, he said. | Boris Nemtsov interviewed hours before death: ‘Putin is a pathological liar’



"It is clear that it was a very sophisticated and professional killing," said Andrey Soldatov, a Russian security expert. Up to 15 people working in three teams could have been involved, he said.


50,000 march in silence over killing of Kremlin critic Boris Nemtsov 

1 Share
Memorial march for Boris Nemtsov attracts large crowds in both Moscow and St Petersburg


The Guardian view on the killing of Boris Nemtsov: a watershed for Russia | Editorial 

1 Share
This brazen assassination under the eyes of the Kremlin’s security cameras shows the true character of the Putin regime
The bullets that killed Boris Nemtsov, a leading opposition figure in Russia, mark a watershed. There have been political assassinations before in Vladimir Putin’s Russia. The list of victims is in fact strikingly long. It includes the journalist and human rights activist Anna Politkovskaya, gunned down in October 2006, after she had reported far and wide on the war crimes of the Russian army and its local allies in Chechnya. Alexander Litvinenko, a Russian former secret service agent in exile in London, was poisoned to death with polonium the very next month. He had repeatedly accused Mr Putin of responsibility for the 1999 Moscow and Volgodonsk bombings that set the stage for the outbreak of another war in Chechnya and contributed to Mr Putin’s political ascent. Mr Litvinenko had also helped western intelligence track down Russian mafia activities in Europe with Kremlin connections.
In 2009, the lawyer Sergei Magnitsky died in prison after he had been beaten up and refused adequate medical treatment. Mr Magnitsky had angered the Putin regime by revealing large-scale frauds involving upper-ranking Russian officials. In 2009, there was also the killing of the prominent human rights lawyer Stanislav Markelov, along with the opposition journalist Anastasia Baburova, and the kidnapping and killing of the human rights activist Natalia Estemirova.
Continue reading...

Fear envelops Russia after killing of Putin critic - CNBC

1 Share

CNBC



Fear envelops Russia after killing of Putin critic
CNBC
About two weeks before he was shot and killed in the highest-profile political assassination inRussia in a decade, Boris Y. Nemtsov met with an old friend to discuss his latest research into what he said was dissembling and misdeeds in the Kremlin. He ...
Boris Nemtsov's Career Traces Arc of Russia's Dimmed Hopes for DemocracyWall Street Journal
Russians march in memory of murdered Putin criticReuters 


Moscow Prepares for March Commemorating Russian Opposition Leader  Voice of America 



ABC News
 -The Guardian 



all 3,318
 ABC News
all 3,253 news articles »

Кадыров уверен в причастности западных спецслужб к «принесению в жертву» Немцова - НТВ.ru

1 Share

НТВ.ru



Кадыров уверен в причастности западных спецслужб к «принесению в жертву» Немцова
НТВ.ru
Лидер Чечни Рамзан Кадыров выразил соболезнования матери, родным и близким Бориса Немцова и назвал свою версию убийства политика, которого застрелили поздно вечером 27 февраля на Большом Москворецком мосту в Москве. 3810. Поделиться ссылкой на выделенное.
Кадыров: Убийство Немцова организовали западные спецслужбыРоссийская Газета
Кадыров обвинил в убийстве Немцова западные спецслужбыАргументы и факты
Рамзан Кадыров: убийство Немцова организовали спецслужбы ЗападаМосковский комсомолец
Актуальные новости - периодическое издание о событиях в мире -Сибинфо -Свежие новости сегодня. Последние новости интернет издания "Fresh-News"
Все похожие статьи: 109 »

Boris Nemtsov interviewed hours before death: ‘Putin is a pathological liar’ 

1 Share
Russian opposition leader Boris Nemtsov gives his last televised interview just hours before being shot dead near the Kremlin. In the interview, on radio station Ekho Moskvy in Moscow, Nemtsov calls for political reform in Russia and labels president Vladimir Putin a 'pathological liar', who he blames for starting an 'insane, aggressive [and] murderous' war in the Ukraine Continue reading...

Thousands attend march in memory of Boris Nemtsov

1 Share
Former Russian prime minister Mikhail Kasyanov addressed the crowd who carried Russian flags and portraits of Nemtsov






Mourning a slain opposition leader, many Russians fear the future 

1 Share
MOSCOW — Russians turned out by the tens of thousands Sunday to mourn an opposition leader who was murdered just steps from the Kremlin, amid fears that his death was just the beginning of a new wave of violence.Read full article >>






Russia's opposition: who is left to take on Vladimir Putin?

1 Share
Three years ago there were several intelligent, charismatic leaders railing against the Kremlin, but prison, exile and death has thinned the dissenting herd
With the murder of Boris Nemtsov, Russia’s beleaguered liberal opposition has lost one of its last audible voices. There was a brief period, after parliamentary elections in late 2011, when street dissent seemed on the rise, and large rallies gripped Moscow.
The optimism dissipated however, after Putin won another resounding victory in the March 2012 presidential elections. The day before his inauguration, a huge protest turned violent. In a sign that any radicalisation would not be tolerated, a number of protesters were put on trial, often for extremely minor offences, and threatened with years in jail.
Continue reading...

Putin’s Russia Now ‘One Large KGB Special Op,’ Golovakha Says 

1 Share

Paul Goble


Staunton, March 1 – Russia’s problem is not Vladimir Putin but rather that “the special services have begun to rule that country and to transform it “into one large special service and its activities into one large special operation,” something even Stalin never permitted, according to Yevgeny Golovakha, deputy head of the Kyiv Institute of Sociology.


This is just one of the conclusions the scholar offers in the course of a wide-ranging interview published today on the occasion of the first anniversary of Putin’s acknowledgement of the use of Russian forces inside Ukraineabout conditions in Ukraine and in the Russian Federation(news.liga.net/interview/politics/5198471-golovakha_u_vlasti_zakonchilos_vremya_na_eksperimenty_i_oshibki.htm).


According to Golovakha, the last year in Ukraine’s history is most similar to the period of the Ukrainian Peoples Republic after 1917. Then too, Ukrainians wanted “dignity and independence but got a tragedy. Now is also a tragedy,” but whether it will be an “optimistic”one as some say or not depends on whether Ukrainian leaders can learn from their mistakes.


They do not have much time, he argues, because “if in past years, we could allow ourselves to experiment, now there is no such possibility.”


That does not mean that Ukraine is about to disappear from the map of the world as some fear. “Ukraine will continue in some form.” But the question is “in what borders, with what kind of a government and in what form?Putin’s goal is to marginalize it, and such “a marginalization of Ukraine is the worst prospect.”


The last year has led to a rise in civic activism and volunteerism, and it has “not led to a final disappointment” or to a situation in which there would be a mass rejection of the ideals of the Maidan.One can only be glad about those things, even if they are in many ways the product of war which inevitably consolidates a society.


But at the same time, he continues, Ukrainians are “at the edge of nervous exhaustion,” and the level of optimism about the future has fallen significantly since last summer: Polls show it down by 20 percent, the sociologist says. And both the deepening economic crisis and the shortcomings of the government are only making that worse.


Golovakha said that when he learned that the Ukrainian revolution was “a revolution of dignity,” he immediately observed that “dignity costs people very dearly.” Those who insisted on it in tsarist and Soviet times, paid heavily for doing so. And one must recognize that people cannot live on dignity alone; they need other things are to survive.


The Ukrainian government since the Maidan “unfortunately” has not been more open than was its predecessor, Golovakha continues. “There is no normal conversation with its this level, with us even today things are absolutely Soviet as far as the closure of the state is concerned.


The sociologist says that he understands how difficult it is for leaders raised in the Soviet past or even the post-Soviet period to change their ways of doing business, but what is a particular matter of concern, he suggests, is that many of the new people who have entered the government have assimilated these earlier values rather than introducing new ones.


But the situation in Russia is much worse. “There is nothing new in the state system of present-day Russia. It is entirely a throwback to the Soviet model,” with its imperial schemes, symbolism, mass psychology, and the like, he says. That has allowed Russia to maintain order, but it requires enemies and “absolutely contradicts” the European path Ukraine has chosen.


Russia always was and always will be “imperialist and chauvinist,” Golovakha says, regardless of who is in office. The only question is how many resources it has to devote to those goals. When it is rich, “it will continue expansion … when it is poor and weak, it will gather its forces and not try to change borders.”


The murder of Boris Nemtsov, he suggests, was one of a series of “ritual murders on symbolic dates. If you recall, Anna Politkovskaya was killed on ‘Putin’s birthday.’ I suggest,” Golovakha continues, “that the murder of Nemtsov on the eve of an anti-war march was no coincidence.”


As to the possibility that Russia will disintegrate into several republics, the Kyiv sociologist says, the threat exists, although it is far from clear whether Ukrainians would benefit from it and Ukrainians should be skeptical about anyone who suggests this or any other outcome is “’inevitable.’”Such predictions should not be taken seriously.


Regarding leadership, he says, there is no question that Putin is a leader. But he has done little more than rely on “prejudices, stereotypes and xenophobia.” That almost always works, has given him an enormous popularity rating and the chance to do whatever he likes as far as the Russian people are concerned.


As for Poroshenko, Golovakha says, he is “a transitional leader” in “a transitional time.”So far, he has pursued a policy of “maneuvering without definite successes and without an explanation of his motives and goals.” Given the challenges, one can understand why, but to be successful, he will have to move beyond such a tactical approach.



Read the whole story

· · · · ·

Russia's Ruble Rebounds in Biggest Monthly Gain Since 1990s

1 Share
The Russian ruble has recorded its biggest monthly gain since the early 1990s amid higher oil prices, an easing of the fighting in eastern Ukraine and a less intensive foreign debt repayment schedule.
Next Page of Stories
Loading...
Page 2

Bremen on high alert after cache of sub-machine guns found following warnings of imminent terror attack

1 Share
Police in the German port city of Bremen arrested two suspected Islamic extremists and detained several others following warnings of an imminent terrorist attack and the discovery of a large cache of Israeli manufactured sub-machine guns in the city.

Russia's Ruble Rebounds in Biggest Monthly Gain Since 1990s - The Moscow Times

1 Share

The Moscow Times



Russia's Ruble Rebounds in Biggest Monthly Gain Since 1990s
The Moscow Times
The Russian ruble has recorded its biggest monthly gain since the early 1990s amid higher oil prices, an easing of the fighting in eastern Ukraine and a less intensive foreign debt repayment schedule as it claws back some of the losses it sustained ...

and more »

Итоги 1 марта. Марш памяти Бориса Немцова

1 Share
Итоги 1 марта. Марш памяти Бориса Немцова
Десятки тысяч людей пришли в воскресенье 1 марта в центр Москвы на траурный марш памяти убитого в ночь на...
Views:
3705
    
85
ratings
Time: 54:55More in News & Politics

Opposition mourns Nemtsov and its prospects

1 Share
Murder appears to have deepened chasm between liberals and Kremlin

Россия выслала двойного агента западной разведки - Интерновости.ру

1 Share

РИА Новости



Россия выслала двойного агента западной разведки
Интерновости.ру
Старший инспектор гражданской авиации Латвии Андрейс Дударевс обвинен в международном шпионаже и выдворен за пределы Российской Федерации. Под именем Андрея Дударева он собирал информацию для Латвии, а позднее для США. Информация предоставлена в ...
СМИ: спецслужбы выслали из России двойного агента США и ЛатвииBFM.Ru
СМИ сообщили о высылке из России двойного агента США и ЛатвииРБК
В Минобороны России пытался устроиться двойной агент США и ЛатвииМаяк
РИА Новости -Утро.Ru -Свежие новости сегодня. Последние новости интернет издания "Fresh-News"
Все похожие статьи: 35 »

За ценную информацию об убийстве Немцова обещано вознаграждение в 3 млн. рублей - Новые Известия

1 Share

НТВ.ru



За ценную информацию об убийстве Немцова обещано вознаграждение в 3 млн. рублей
Новые Известия
Следственный комитет России просит отозваться лиц, ставших свидетелями убийства политика Бориса Немцова, либо лиц, которые располагают какой-либо информацией об обстоятельствах трагедии. За наиболее ценные сведения правоохранители готовы выплатить 3 млн. рублей ...
СКР обещает 3 миллиона рублей за ценную информацию об убийстве НемцоваPro Город НН
За информацию по делу об убийстве Немцова выплатят 3 млн рублейКомсомольская правда
СКР объявил о награде в 3 млн рублей за информацию об убийстве НемцоваМой район
НТВ.ru -Аргументы и факты -Интерновости.ру
Все похожие статьи: 134 »
Next Page of Stories
Loading...
Page 3

After the assassination of opposition leader Boris Nemtsov, can Russia still claim to be a democracy? 

1 Share
Telegraph View: Vladimir Putin has denied involvement in the killing, but his enemies have a strange habit of dying when it is most convenient








Read the whole story

· ·

Boris Nemtsov: tens of thousands march in memory of murdered politician 

1 Share
Mood of quiet dismay as crowds mourn Vladimir Putin’s adversary who was gunned down near the Kremlin on Friday
They came with placards and plaintive cries of “shame” – a vast column of mourners snaking through central Moscow to commemorate the latest Russian opposition figure to meet a wretched fate.
But as tens of thousands trudged through the bone-chilling Moscow drizzle to pay their last respects to Boris Nemtsov, the adversary of Vladimir Putin, gunned down a stone’s throw from the Kremlin on Friday night, the mood was more one of quiet dismay rather than explosive anger.
Related:
Russia's opposition: who is left to take on Vladimir Putin? Continue reading...