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Police fear 'war on cops' after 11 shootings - US news - Crime & courts

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A spate of shooting attacks on law enforcement officers has authorities concerned about a war on cops.
In just 24 hours, at least 11 officers were shot. The shootings included Sunday attacks at traffic stops in Indiana and Oregon, a Detroit police station shooting that wounded four officers, and a shootout at a Port Orchard, Wash., Wal-Mart that injured two deputies. On Monday morning, two officers were shot dead and a U.S. Marshal was wounded by a gunman in St. Petersburg, Fla.
On Thursday, two Miami-Dade, Fla., detectives were killed by a murder suspect they were trying to arrest.
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"It's not a fluke," said Richard Roberts, spokesman for the International Union of Police Associations. "There's a perception among officers in the field that there’s a war on cops going on."
With the Florida deaths, the nation is on track in 2011 to match the 162 police officers killed in the line of duty in 2010, said Steve Groeninger, spokesman for the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund, the Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit that tracks police casualties. In January this year there have been 14 deaths, the same number as in January 2010, the fund posted on its web site.
The 2010 toll ended a two-year drop in fatalities and spiked 43 percent over the 117 killed in 2009, Groeninger said.
Story: Suspect dead after 2 cops killed, marshal wounded in Fla. home
Law enforcement advocates worry that cuts in police budgets could exacerbate the danger.
"We don't have any data, but there seems to be a type of criminal out there looking to thwart authority," he said.
He cited the example of Jared Loughner, accused of killing six and wounding 13, including Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, on Jan. 8 in Tucson, Ariz. "People with this mentality feel the need to eliminate those in position of authority," he said.
Roberts said the recent shootings are reminders that officers must constantly stay on alert.
"The bad guys are not afraid of cops," Roberts said. "They’re rarely rational. You get that combination, when you ID yourself as a cop, it does not scare them away; it makes it more dangerous for you."
Noting the Oregon and Indiana shootings occurred during so-called "routine traffic stops," Roberts said, "The word routine should be eliminated from the job. There's no such thing. There is only 'known risk' and 'unknown risk' " he said.
Roberts, a former North Beach, Md., police officer, and Groeninger both voiced worries over police budget cuts.
Reducing police response times and cutting back on in-service training can endanger not just citizens but cops on patrol, they said.
"It's not a good situation out there," Groeninger said.
Here is the status of the police shooting investigations on Monday:
  • Indianapolis police say they arrested Thomas Hardy in the shooting of Officer David Moore, who was shot in the face and body and remained in a coma.
  • A manhunt continued in the Oregon beach town of Waldport for a gunman who shot officer Steven Dodds, 45, a six-year veteran of the Lincoln City Police Department. Police were looking for the owner of a 1984 Dodge truck that fled the shooting scene.
  • In Detroit, four officers shot inside their precinct were recovering, police said. Investigators said Lamar Moore, 38, of Detroit entered the 6th Precinct on the city's northwest side about 4:30 p.m. Sunday and shot Cmdr. Brian Davis, Officer David Anderson; Sgt. Ray Saati; and Sgt. Carrie Schulz. Officers returned fire and killed Moore, who was scheduled to be sentenced Monday for his role in a double homicide, they said.
  • One of two deputies wounded in Port Orchard, Wash., was released from the hospital while another remained in satisfactory condition after being wounded Sunday in a gunfight. A suspect and a female victim who came running to his aid were killed. Police were investigating how the female victim was shot. The gunman was identified as Anthony A. Martinez, 31, of Salt Lake City. The Deseret News said police had issued an endangered persons advisory for a 13-year-old runaway believed to be traveling with Martinez.
  • In St. Petersburg, Fla., a suspected gunman was found dead after two police officers were shot to death and a U.S. marshal was injured as they tried to make an arrest. Suncoast Benevolent Association President Mark Marland identified the fallen officers as Tom Baitinger and Jeffrey Yaslowitz.
  • In Miami, thousands of law enforcement officers gathered at a funeral service in American Airlines Arena to honor Roger Castillo, 41, Amanda Haworth, 44, who were killed on Thursday while serving a warrant on a suspected killer. The suspect, 22-year-old Johnny Simms, was killed by another officer.

The Associated Press and Reuters also contributed to this report.
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Stop the war on police

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Maj. Jay McDonald 2:27 p.m. EDT August 31, 2014
Marion Police Department Maj. Jay McDonald, commander of the investigations unit, which includes the MARMET Drug Task Force, testified before the Ohio House of Representatives study committee addressing the drug epidemic in Ohio. The committee heard from witnesses on the current drug issues and the challenges it presents to employers and educators and how they work with law enforcement. The hearing, chaired by Rep. Dorothy Pelanda, R-Marysville, was held Wednesday, in Maynard Hall on the Marion campus of The Ohio State University. (Photo: Bill Sinden/The Marion Star )
Other than a handful of eyewitnesses who've yet to be subjected to the rigors of cross-examination, none of us really knows what happened when a Ferguson, Missouri, police officer encountered Michael Brown. But as a law enforcement officer with 21 years of experience, I do know those voicing their opinions loudest often have the poorest understanding of police work.
I've met thousands of cops in my career — black and white, male and female, rural and urban. None of them relishes the prospect of shooting someone. Yet with the most recent social media and news coverage of the events in Ferguson, a troubling narrative is developing. People who ought to know better are suggesting some police officers are more likely than others to use deadly violence against a particular group of citizens.
That's a distortion and it's wrong.
Most of us were taught by our parents to avoid prejudging a situation until both sides have been fairly heard. That's also the basic premise of our legal system. Yet in our current culture, information comes at us like a turbulent tidal wave of facts mixed with opinion and conjecture conflated with bias. Prejudgment follows.
Within a few hours of the Ferguson shooting, news stations were abuzz with accounts of an "unarmed black teenager" being shot by a police officer. That was the spark.
Then witnesses of dubious credibility falsely alleged the officer shot Michael Brown in the back. That was the fuel.
The resulting conflagration has begun to die down, but re-ignition awaits.
While some observers have characterized the violence that broke out following this incident as symptomatic of social-economic or racial unrest, I see its effect as even more worrisome. When those who work in the justice system change their actions in response to threats of violence, the rule of law begins to morph into the rule of the mob. And when elected officials, such as Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon, prejudge the actions of a police officer who has yet to be heard from, the illegitimacy of mob rule moves from the streets to the halls of government.
Racism has an ugly history in America and the debate over whether we've advanced past it is a relevant discussion. But while that discussion continues, far too many agitators have essentially declared war on police. And as a nation, we must reject that attack.
We task officers to patrol dangerous and unpredictable terrain and require them to make split-second, life-and-death decisions to protect others. When they get it right — as they almost always do — little notice is taken. On those rare occasions when they get it wrong, headlines blare the details and the reign of armchair cops begins.
For each of the infrequent occasions when a law enforcement officer is forced by deadly circumstances to shoot someone, there should be a review. A fair and thorough investigation protects everyone involved. But prejudgment hinders a fair review.
Just as a tragedy like this ought not be a catalyst to abandon reason and deliberation in the judicial system, it should neither spur hasty changes in our legislative process. Those currently decrying the "militarization of police" fail to understand the equipment being transferred from the military to law enforcement agencies would otherwise be scrapped or sold to foreign governments.
Indeed, most of this surplus military gear is for the support and safety of officers, not for use as weaponry. On the battlefield, an armored vehicle is used to deploy armed troops into the fight. But on the scene of an active school shooting, that same vehicle can help first responders transport paramedics to wounded victims still in the line of fire.
As a police officer, I want only that equipment that will keep my fellow officers, the public and myself safe. Better vests, more versatile less-than-lethal weapons like TASERS and better communication devices have all made our communities safer.
Even if you don't believe that those who protect and serve deserve the benefit of the doubt, surely you can agree that they ought to be trained well, equipped sufficiently and not be presumed to be at fault.
Jay McDonald is a Marion police officer and president of the Ohio Fraternal Order of Police. The Marion Police Department can be reached at 740-375-5155.
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'War On Cops' Nets More Police Deaths, '15 Ambush Assaults'

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by AWR Hawkins30 Dec 2014453
The result? More firearm-related police fatalities in 2014 and many of these fatalities coming in the “15 ambush assaults” carried out during 2014.
According to Fox News, firearm-related deaths for police officers rose “56 percent” in 2014–reaching a total of “50 officers” killed, including those killed in “ambush assaults.” There were “15 ambush assaults” in 2012 as well, but that number had dropped to “5” in 2013.
With the number on the rise once more, Memorial Fund CEO Craig Floyd is asking agitators to “tone down the rhetoric and rally in support of law enforcement.” Just as important, he says we need to rally “against lawlessness.”
Floyd said he is worried the violent and vitriolic-laced reactions to jury decisions in racially charged incidents, are making officers less and less safe. He said such “sentiment in America is influencing weak-minded individuals to launch violent assaults against the men and women working to enforce our laws and keep our nation safe.”
Follow AWR Hawkins on Twitter @AWRHawkins   Reach him directly at <a href="mailto:awrhawkins@breitbart.com">awrhawkins@breitbart.com</a>.

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Sheriff David Clarke: "War On Police" Fueled By "Anti-Cop Hatred and Rhetoric," Ferguson "False Narrative" | Video

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SHERIFF DAVID CLARKE, MILWAUKEE COUNTY: Well, this war on our nation's finest, the American police officer, continues, but it continues to be fueled by some very important people. It's empty rhetoric for what Eric Holder offered today and the president through a tweet of all things, when they have now an obligation to stand up and remind people in these urban ghettos and these American ghettos, they have a responsibility to comply with law enforcement officers' commands...
If we want to end deadly encounters between police and citizens, we have to tell these young black men to stop attacking the police, stop fighting, stop resisting police when they're trying to pull you over and cooperate with their lawful commands. If they have complaints about the way they're treat, some of these may be justified. There's a process for that. The fact that Eric Holder released this report last week -- by the way it was a junk report. There was no objectivity. He cherry picked a few e-mail and misapplied and using misapplication of statistics.

Yes, there is a war on police: Column

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The new breed of high-tech anti-police protesters are deadly serious.

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The murder of two New York policemen shouldn't surprise anyone. We've been watching liberal protesters war against police since the rise of Occupy Wall Street three years ago.
The #Shutitdown protests are filled with the same hateful rhetoric against police, spitting, curses and violence as they invade malls and block highways. If police respond, they are videotaped, photographed and lambasted on social media and left-wing websites. Only a week before the killings, protesters marched in New York chanting, "What do we want? Dead cops! When do we want it? Now!"
The same sentiment spread on Twitter as some were gleeful about the murders. One asked: "Am I the only one happy about this breaking news 2 cops getting shot"? She wasn't. The hashtag #F---12overflowed with hate for #pigpolice.
Now, many protesters, like White House favorite and MSNBC host Al Sharpton, claim they aren't anti-police, they are pro-justice.
They lie.
Union organizer Robert Murray was "arraigned on charges of assaulting an officer, resisting arrest, rioting and obstruction" for an attack on two New York police lieutenants during one "justice" protesttwo weeks ago, according to CBSTwo Bronx public defenders appeared in a rap video with the lyrics, "For Mike Brown and Sean Bell, a cop got to get killed." In Philadelphia, a paramedic posted a photo showing two black men pointing a gun at a police officer and describing police as "our real enemy."
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Protesters marked Black Friday in San Francisco with vandalism and confrontations. One held a camera in front of a police officer and said "F--- you" nine times just inches away. When that didn't work, he physically jarred the officer to provoke an arrest.
Flashback to fall 2011 when appeared. The movement called for "revolution" and deliberately provoked police. One founder admitted OWS was created by "anarchists" and had a strategy of "refusing to accept the legitimacy of the existing legal order."
The result was predictable. There have been more than 7,700 hundred Occupiers arrested for everything from trespassing to an attempted bombing. Rioting, arson and sex crimes were part of the little-told story of the movement.
Liberals are still outraged that veteran was injured at an protest. However, left-wing magazine Mother Jones admitted protesters initiated the violence. Writer James West said some protesters instigated aconfrontation. "At the height of this melee, I saw two men throw bottles at the police," he explained.
Instigation of police is commonplace at protests. In San Diego, two Occupy "press" members cursed and threatened police with calls to "dox" specific officers. That's where hackers release private information including credit card numbers, phone numbers and addresses. It was used on NYPD officer police officer Anthony Bologna and his family after he pepper sprayed protesters.
Hating police isn't new. The song "F--- tha Police" came out in 1989 and is #425 on Rolling Stone's top 500 songs. Ice-T and his band followed it in 1992 with "Cop Killer."
No one claims police are angels. We ask 780,000 police to keep order in a nation of 317 million. Problems, abuse and even unwarranted killings are virtually guaranteed. But this new, high-tech, anti-police culture is deadly serious.
In addition to its own editorials, USA TODAY publishes diverse opinions from outside writers, including our Board of Contributors. To read more columns like this, go to the Opinion front page or sign up for the daily Opinion e-mail newsletter.
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war on police - Google Search

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  1. Yes, there is a war on police: Column - USA Today

    <a href="http://www.usatoday.com/" rel="nofollow">www.usatoday.com/</a>...police...war...al...war.../20821457/
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    Dec 29, 2014 - The murder of two New York policemen shouldn't surprise anyone. We've been watching liberal protesters war against police since the rise of ...
  2. Sheriff David Clarke: "War On Police" Fueled By "Anti-Cop ...

    <a href="http://www.realclearpolitics.com/.../sheriff_david_clarke_" rel="nofollow">www.realclearpolitics.com/.../sheriff_david_clarke_</a>war_...
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    Mar 12, 2015 - SHERIFF DAVID CLARKE, MILWAUKEE COUNTY: Well, this war on our nation's finest, the American police officer, continues, but it continues ...
  3. 'War On Cops' Nets More Police Deaths, '15 Ambush ...

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    Dec 30, 2014 - 'War On Cops' Nets More Police Deaths, '15 Ambush Assaults'. 0 · Mike Segar/ ...Police Officer Shooting Deaths Are Up 56 Percent in 2014.
  4. Every War On Drugs Myth Thoroughly Destroyed By A ...

    <a href="http://www.upworthy.com/every-" rel="nofollow">www.upworthy.com/every-</a>war-on-drugs-myth-thoroughly-de...
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    Retired police Capt. Peter Christ is about to make more sense about the War on Drugs than anyone you've ever heard in the past. His basic premise is that we ...
  5. Stop the war on police - The Marion Star

    <a href="http://www.marionstar.com/story/" rel="nofollow">www.marionstar.com/story/</a>...war-police/14816425/
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    Aug 31, 2014 - Jumping to Conclusions About the Actions of Law Enforcement Makes Us All Less Safe.
  6. Street Gang Just Declared All Out War On Cops, Sending ...

    countercurrentnews.com/2015/01/bgf-baltimore-police/
    Jan 7, 2015 - Police say that an infamous street gang known as the Black Guerrilla Family recently declared all out war on cops. This comes on the heels of ...
  7. Police State Alex Jones' Infowars: There's a war on for your ...

    <a href="http://www.info" rel="nofollow">www.info</a>wars.com/category/police-state/
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    Chicago Will Pay $5.5 Million in "Reparations" to Victims of Police Torture. by Nick Gillespie ... PoliceDepartment Spokesperson Arrested for Child Pornography.
  8. War on police? Officers in three cities targets of reported ...

    twitchy.com/.../war-on-police-officers-in-three-cities-targets-of-reported-...
    Dec 29, 2014 - WTDV in Raleigh reports that someone fired a shot through a glass door into a Durham police officer's apartment Monday. Police say they're ...
  9. Police fear 'war on cops' - NBC News

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    Jan 24, 2011 - A spate of shooting attacks on police has officers concerned that a war on cops has broken out; death toll this year on track to match deadly ...
  10. Starnes: Ferguson cops latest victims in war on police ...

    video.foxnews.com/.../starnes-fergu...
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    Starnes: Ferguson cops latest victims in war on police. Mar. 13, 2015 - 2:05 - There's a war on cops - and all ...

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fbi statistics police shootings - Google Search

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  1. FBI Releases 2013 Statistics on Law Enforcement Officers ...

    <a href="http://www.fbi.gov" rel="nofollow">www.fbi.gov</a> › ... › Press Releases
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    Nov 24, 2014 - According to statistics collected by the FBI, 76 law enforcement officers were killed in line-of-duty incidents in 2013. Of these, 27 law ...
  2. FBI Releases 2012 Statistics on Law Enforcement Officers ...

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    Oct 28, 2013 - According to statistics collected by the FBI, 95 law enforcement officers were killed in line-of-duty incidents in 2012. Of these, 48 law ...
  3. List of killings by law enforcement officers in the United ...

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    The National Center for Health Statistics maintains the National Vital ... The FBI maintains the Uniform Crime Reporting Program (UCR) which relies on the ... These include Fatal Encounters and U.S. Police Shootings Data at Deadspin.
  4. How many police shootings a year? No one knows - The ...

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    Sep 8, 2014 - In 2012, the most recent year for which FBI data is available, it was 48 ...Comprehensive statistics on officer-involved shootings are also not  ...
  5. Study reveals important truths hidden in the details of officer ...

    www.policeone.com/officer-shootings/.../117909-Study-revea...
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    A multiple-officer shooting, in which more than one officer fires during a deadly ... involving heavily armed suspects," such as the infamous FBI Miami shootout and .... I've found no statistical evidence whatever of this much-feared consequence  ...
  6. Factcheck: Grim statistics on race and police ... - CNN.com

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    Dec 3, 2014 - A ProPublica analysis of police shootings shows that young black men ... "Although theFBI does have some statistics, most people know that  ...
  7. Another (Much Higher) Count Of Homicides By Police ...

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    Nate Silver's FiveThirtyEight uses statistical analysis — hard numbers — to tell ... The FBI tracks “justifiable” police homicides, which it reports to be about 400 per year, ... 124 incidents (85 percent) were clear-cut police shootings in which the  ...
  8. Hundreds of Police Killings Are Uncounted in Federal Stats

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    Dec 3, 2014 - Yet according to national statistics intended to track police killings, .... The FBI has almost no records of police shootings from departments in  ...
  9. Local police involved in 400 killings per year - USA Today

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    Aug 15, 2014 - ... they are submitted to the FBI and the statistics on "justifiable" homicides have ...Police arrest a man who was protesting the shooting death of  ...
  10. Here's the Data That Shows Cops Kill Black People at a ...

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    Sep 10, 2014 - Plus: the crazy way the FBI classifies all police shooting victims as criminals. ... The Justice Department's Bureau of Justice Statistics reports that  ...

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How many police shootings a year? No one knows

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A summer of high-profile police shootings, most notably the Aug. 9 shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., has rekindled a decades-long debate over law enforcement’s use of lethal force.
Police unions and some law-and-order conservatives insist that shootings by officers are rare and even more rarely unjustified. Civil rights groups and some on the left have just as quickly prescribed racial motives to the shootings, declaring that black and brown men are being “executed” by officers.
And, like all previous incarnations of the clash over police force, the debate remains absent access to a crucial, fundamental fact.
Criminal justice experts note that, while the federal government and national research groups keep scads of data and statistics— on topics ranging from how many people were victims of unprovoked shark attacks (53 in 2013) to the number of hogs and pigs living on farms in the U.S. (upwards of 64,000,000 according to 2010 numbers) — there is no reliable national data on how many people are shot by police officers each year.
The government does, however, keep a database of how many officers are killed in the line of duty. In 2012, the most recent year for which FBI data is available, it was 48 – 44 of them killed with firearms.
But how many people in the United States were shot, or killed, by law enforcement officers during that year? No one knows.
Officials with the Justice Department keep no comprehensive database or record of police shootings, instead allowing the nation’s more than 17,000 law enforcement agencies to self-report officer-involved shootings as part of the FBI’s annual data on “justifiable homicides” by law enforcement.
That number – which only includes self-reported information from about 750 law enforcement agencies – hovers around 400 “justifiable homicides” by police officers each year. The DOJ’s Bureau of Justice Statistics also tracks “arrest-related deaths.” But the department stopped releasing those numbers after 2009, because, like the FBI data, they were widely regarded as unreliable.
“What’s there is crappy data,” said David A. Klinger, a former police officer and criminal justice professor at the University of Missouri who studies police use of force.
Several independent trackers, primarily journalists and academics who study criminal justice, insist the accurate number of people shot and killed by police officers each year is consistently upwards of 1,000 each year.
“The FBI’s justifiable homicides and the estimates from (arrest-related deaths) both have significant limitations in terms of coverage and reliability that are primarily due to agency participation and measurement issues,” said Michael Planty, one of the Justice Department’s chief statisticians, in an email.
Even less data exists for officer-involved shootings that do not result in fatalities.
“We do not have information at the national level for police shootings that result in non-fatal injury or no injury to a civilian,” Planty said.
Comprehensive statistics on officer-involved shootings are also not kept by any of the nation’s leading gun violence and police research groups and think tanks.
In fact, prior to the Brown’s shooting, the only person attempting to keep track of the number of police shootings was D. Brian Burghart, the editor and publisher of the 29,000-circulation Reno News & Review, who launched his “Fatal Encounters” project in 2012.
“Don’t you find it spookey? This is information, this is the government’s job,” Burghart said. “One of the government’s major jobs is to protect us. How can it protect us if it doesn’t know what the best practices are? If it doesn’t know if one local department is killing people at a higher rate than others? When it can’t make decisions based on real numbers to come up with best practices? That to me is an abdication of responsibilities.”
Burghart has enlisted a team of volunteers to search news clips as well as file records requests for data, with the goal of collecting a database that will chronicle several years-worth of police shootings.
As of September 1, according to Burghart’s estimates, 83 other people had been killed by police officers in the United States since Michael Brown’s death.
Law enforcement watchdog groups and think tanks say that the lack of comprehensive data on police shootings hampers the ability of departments to develop best practices and cut down on unnecessary shootings.
The way we improve practices is to take information about what’s happening in the field to make those improvements,” said Chuck Wexler, executive director of the Police Executive Research Forum, a nonpartisan think tank in D.C. that produces reports on police tactics. “The more we know about (the number of officer-involved shootings) the better off we’ll be.”
Other than basic statistical analysis, Wexler said, a comprehensive database of police shootings would allow departments to better analyze when officers are drawing and using their guns – potentially leading to policy changes that could save lives.
He noted a shift in policy by the New York Police Department in 1972, in which the department instructed its officers to no longer shoot at moving vehicles.
“When they made that change the number of NYPD shootings plummeted,” he said.
James O. Pasco, the national executive director of the Fraternal Order of Police, believes that an accurate database would require Congress to pass a law requiring police departments to report their shooting data to a federal agency, presumably the FBI.
“Otherwise it’s an unfunded mandate,” Pasco said. “About 80 percent of police departments have fewer than 10 officers. They don’t have huge data collecting operations. They don’t even have a single person in some of these departments who are dedicated to all the statistical work they have to do now.”
Pasco said he doesn’t know what the union’s position would be on a legal requirement to report shootings and the result of shooting investigations.
“It would depend on what the law looked like,” he said. “Clearly, if it’s just a function of collecting the data, I can’t see that we would have a problem with that. Our issues are with due process for officers.”
The most detailed analysis of police shootings to date was conducted by Jim Fisher, a former FBI agent and criminal justice professor who now authors true crime books.
“I was rather surprised to find there are no statistics,” Fisher said. “The answer to me is pretty obvious: the government just doesn’t want us to know how many people are shot by the police every year.”
In 2011, he scoured the Internet several times a day every day, compiling a database of every officer-involved shooting he could find. Ultimately, he tracked 1,146 shootings by police officers, 607 of them fatal shootings.
“I was surprised at how many shootings, a reasonable person would conclude, were unnecessary,” Fisher said.
Earlier this year, the Gawker Media-owned sports Web site Deadspin launched a project to crowd-source a definitive list of police shootings by analyzing local media reports – a system modelled off of Fisher’s 2011 effort.
“Having that data would be extremely helpful, in more ways than one,” said Adolphus M. Pruitt, president of the St. Louis chapter of the NAACP, who has been one of those most vocal about allegations of police brutality in light of Brown’s shooting. “We track everything. There is no reason in the world for us to not be able to know just how many people the police are shooting in any given year.”
In the absence of reliable data, the FBI’s “justifiable homicides” statistics continues to be widely cited in academic studies, media reports, and other examinations of the use of lethal force by law enforcement despite being decried as unreliable by officials inside the Justice Department and other officials outside of the government.
As they do, criminal justice experts note that even compiling accurate numbers of people shot and killed by the police would be just a start.
“Every study that I’m aware of shows that most of the people who are shot by the cops survive and most of the time when cops shoot the bullets don’t hit,” said Klinger, who will soon publish a new study analyzing police shootings in St. Louis.
That study, prepared with several other academics, found that there were 230 instances in the City of St. Louis between 2003 and 2012 when officers fired their weapons. Only 37 of those fired upon were killed.
“If your statistics look just at dead bodies you’d be under-counting it by 85 percent,” Klinger said. “If the cops are shooting, we need to now when they are shooting, not just when they kill somebody with the bullets.”
Kimberly Kindy contributed to this report.

Wesley Lowery is a national reporter covering law enforcement and justice for the Washington Post. He previously covered Congress and national politics.
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FBI figures tweaked to show phony increase in mass shootings, report says

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Dec. 14, 2012: In this file photo provided by the Newtown Bee, a police officer leads two women and a child from Sandy Hook Elementary School. (AP/Newtown Bee)
Crime stats published by the FBI and relied upon by the media distort the gun violence and leave the public with the impression "mass shooting" incidents are a much bigger threat than they really are, according to a criminologist and Second Amendment scholar.
The bureau's annual reports tabulating and classifying a wide range of crime throughout the nation have been historically free of politics, but John Lott, president of the Crime Prevention Research Center, said the latest statistics contain numbers that are misleading at best and deliberately fudged at worst. Lott believes the numbers may have been presented to overstate for political purposes the true risk of being a victim of random gun crimes.
"The FBI put out a clearly incorrect set of numbers on public shootings shortly before the November election last year,” said Lott, a frequent opinion writer for <a href="http://FoxNews.com" rel="nofollow">FoxNews.com</a> and author of "More Guns, Less Crime." “I have been reading FBI reports for 30 years and I have never seen anything like this.It is one thing for the Bureau of Justice Statistics or the National Institute of Justice to put out politically biased studies, but there has always been a Chinese wall separating the FBI raw data collection from political pressures.”
Asked for comment, Katherine Schweit, the FBI's section chief of the bureau's Active Shooter Initiative, said only Tuesday night that its report isolates active shooter incidents and evaluates available data based on methodology detailed on the FBI's official website.
“Since 1976, there have been ups and downs in incidents but there has been no trend upward or downward in mass shootings.”
- Prof. James Alan Fox, Northeastern University.
FBI figures released last September appear to show so-called "mass shooter" attacks and deaths have dramatically increased since 2000. The report asserted there were a total 160 such incidents in public places between 2000 and 2013, with attacks dramatically increased to 17 in 2013 from just one in 2000. The statistics also showed murders jumping to 86 from just seven over the span.
But Lott's group said a major flaw is the fact that the data was gleaned from news reports, and noted recent accounts were more accessible, and thus over-represented. Recent cases of the far more common “active shooting incidents” were added to legitimate cases of mass shooting incidents, making the more recent years covered by the report appear to have a large increase in both mass shootings and deaths from them.

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Friday, July 20, 2012: An Aurora Police officer talks on his radio outside of the Century 16 theater where as many as 14 people were killed and many injured during a shooting in Aurora, Colo. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)
The media most often took the numbers at face value, allowing for the perception of an increase in mass shootings and deaths from them, Lott said. A counter report by the CPRC shows that if the biases and errors were corrected, the Bureau’s data would show that the annual growth rate for homicides in mass shootings had been cut in half, Lott said.
He suspects manipulation, and not merely mistakes.
“The administration has obviously been willing to do a lot to push for gun control; with everything from ‘Operation Choke Point’ to ‘Fast and Furious,’ and this is just part of that push. Given the level of politicization in [the] Department of Justice, this is not particularly surprising.”
However, in an introduction from a copy of the report, the authors did appear to differentiate between “mass killings” and “active shooter incidents.”
“In 2013, the president signed into law the Investigative Assistance for Violent Crimes Act of 2012, which granted the attorney general the authority to assist in the investigation of ‘violent acts and shootings occurring in a place of public use’ and in the investigation of ‘mass killings and attempted mass killings at the request of an appropriate law enforcement official of a state or political subdivision,’” read the report. “To provide further clarity on these threats, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) in 2014 initiated a study of ‘active shooter’ incidents.”

Related Image


Thursday, Nov. 6, 2009: Emergency personnel transport an unidentified soldier from the Soldier Readiness Center following a shooting at Fort Hood, Texas. (AP)
In a September press release touting their findings, the Bureau stated:
"[W]e believe the information contained in this study can benefit anyone who could potentially be in an active shooter situation—like emergency personnel, employees of retail corporations and other businesses, educators and students, government and military personnel, members of the general public, etc.—by giving them a better understanding of how these incidents play out."
James Alan Fox, a professor of criminology, law, and public policy at Northeastern University, agreed that the FBI numbers were being misinterpreted to overstate the incidents and risks of mass shootings. But he blamed the media, not the FBI.
“The media misinterpreted the report,” Fox said. “An active shooter incident is not the same as a mass shooting.”
Fox said using news reports to compile crime statistics is not a reliable method, and said his own research has found no upward trend in mass shootings.
“Since 1976, there have been ups and downs in incidents but there has been no trend upward or downward in mass shootings,” he said.
Perry Chiaramonte is a reporter for <a href="http://FoxNews.com" rel="nofollow">FoxNews.com</a>. Follow him on Twitter at @perrych
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Matthew T. Mangino: A clearer picture of police shootings begins to emerge - News - The Daily Register - Harrisburg, IL - Harrisburg, IL

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  • atthew T. Mangino: A clearer picture of police shootings begins to emerge

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      A Pennsylvania police officer has been charged with murder in the death of a man who sped away after the officer noticed he had an expired inspection sticker on his vehicle. When the officer caught up with the man he attempted to flee on foot.
      The officer used a stun gun knocking the suspect to the ground. She then shot him twice as he lay face down. The incident was recorded by a camera activated on the officer’s stun gun.
      The arrest of a police officer as a result of a shooting in the line of duty is extremely rare. Families in Ferguson, Cleveland and communities too numerous to mention can attest to that phenomenon.
      A little way down the Pennsylvania Turnpike, Philadelphia city officials are dealing with a pervasive problem of police-related shootings. Philadelphia police shot 394 people between 2007 and 2013. According to the Philadelphia Inquirer, police data indicates that 540 officers fired their guns in 364 incidents. Sixty-eight officers were involved in more than one shooting — of those, 12 shot three people each, while another three shot four people each.
      If those statistics aren’t alarming enough, consider that police-involved shootings are largely under reported. In February, FBI Director James Comey admitted during a speech at Georgetown University that, “It’s ridiculous that I can’t tell you how many people were shot by the police in this country — last week, last year, the last decade.”
      Jim Fisher, a former FBI agent and noted author, compiled his own statistics for police-related shootings in 2011. Why no national database of police-involved shooting? Fisher contends, “The answer is simple: they don’t want us to know. Why? Because police shoot a lot more people than we think.”
      The Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) confirmed that the government’s own data on police involved deaths have been off for more than a decade — by more than 100 percent.
      The report estimates that there were “an average of 928 law enforcement homicides per year” from 2003 through 2011 — which means, according to the Philadelphia Inquirer, that previous yearly tallies by the BJS and the FBI included fewer than half of all such deaths.
      More alarming is that a significant number of victims of police-reported shootings are mentally ill. A joint report by the Treatment Advocacy Center and the National Sheriffs Association — Justifiable Homicides by Law Enforcement: What is the Role of Mental Illness? — noted that “Although no national data is collected, multiple informal studies and accounts support the conclusion that “at least half of the people shot and killed by police each year in this country have mental health problems.”
      The public has no hard data on the number of police-involved shootings, and as many as one in two of those killings may have been prevented by adequate police training and education.
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      Matthew T. Mangino: A clearer picture of police shootings begins to emerge - News - The Daily Register - Harrisburg, IL

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      A Pennsylvania police officer has been charged with murder in the death of a man who sped away after the officer noticed he had an expired inspection sticker on his vehicle. When the officer caught up with the man he attempted to flee on foot.
      The officer used a stun gun knocking the suspect to the ground. She then shot him twice as he lay face down. The incident was recorded by a camera activated on the officer’s stun gun.
      The arrest of a police officer as a result of a shooting in the line of duty is extremely rare. Families in Ferguson, Cleveland and communities too numerous to mention can attest to that phenomenon.
      A little way down the Pennsylvania Turnpike, Philadelphia city officials are dealing with a pervasive problem of police-related shootings. Philadelphia police shot 394 people between 2007 and 2013. According to the Philadelphia Inquirer, police data indicates that 540 officers fired their guns in 364 incidents. Sixty-eight officers were involved in more than one shooting — of those, 12 shot three people each, while another three shot four people each.
      If those statistics aren’t alarming enough, consider that police-involved shootings are largely under reported. In February, FBI Director James Comey admitted during a speech at Georgetown University that, “It’s ridiculous that I can’t tell you how many people were shot by the police in this country — last week, last year, the last decade.”
      Jim Fisher, a former FBI agent and noted author, compiled his own statistics for police-related shootings in 2011. Why no national database of police-involved shooting? Fisher contends, “The answer is simple: they don’t want us to know. Why? Because police shoot a lot more people than we think.”
      The Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) confirmed that the government’s own data on police involved deaths have been off for more than a decade — by more than 100 percent.
      The report estimates that there were “an average of 928 law enforcement homicides per year” from 2003 through 2011 — which means, according to the Philadelphia Inquirer, that previous yearly tallies by the BJS and the FBI included fewer than half of all such deaths.
      More alarming is that a significant number of victims of police-reported shootings are mentally ill. A joint report by the Treatment Advocacy Center and the National Sheriffs Association — Justifiable Homicides by Law Enforcement: What is the Role of Mental Illness? — noted that “Although no national data is collected, multiple informal studies and accounts support the conclusion that “at least half of the people shot and killed by police each year in this country have mental health problems.”
      The public has no hard data on the number of police-involved shootings, and as many as one in two of those killings may have been prevented by adequate police training and education.
      Page 2 of 2 - Just this week the United States Supreme Court heard arguments in a case that has the potential to insure that much needed training and education is mandated. The case, Sheehan v. San Francisco, could settle the extent to which the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) serves as a check on police officers’ interactions with people with mental illnesses.
      Teresa Sheehan was mentally ill, in her 50s, overweight, and in her own home wielding a knife when she was shot five times by San Francisco Police.
      The ADA requires local governments to provide “reasonable accommodations” to individuals with disabilities, and according to Slate, courts have interpreted that guarantee to include arrests — that is, police should take into account a person’s disabilities when taking them into custody.
      The ADA has done wonders to protect men and women in the workplace and disabled consumers. Can this be the catalyst to help cut down on police-involved shootings?
      Matthew T. Mangino is of counsel with Luxenberg, Garbett, Kelly & George P.C. His book “The Executioner’s Toll, 2010” was released by McFarland Publishing. You can reach him at <a href="http://www.mattmangino.com" rel="nofollow">www.mattmangino.com</a> and follow him on Twitter at @MatthewTMangino.

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      Former F.B.I. Agent Sues, Claiming Retaliation Over Misgivings in Anthrax Case

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