Saturday, August 8, 2015

How Putin Turns Turmoil in the Middle East to His Advantage Saturday August 8th, 2015 at 9:37 PM

How Putin Turns Turmoil in the Middle East to His Advantage

1 Share
If the Middle East did not exist, Moscow would definitely have to invent it.
Chaos in the Arab world has offered the Kremlin a convenient opportunity to shape public opinion at home on such issues as the legitimacy of the regime, its confrontation with the West and the situation in Ukraine. As a result, for the past two years, Middle East unrest has become one of the most popular topics discussed by Russian journalists and politicians.
Many middle- and working-class Russians are nostalgic for the “imperial” glory of the USSR, and the Kremlin gives them what they want. Russian support for Damascus, close relations with Tehran and rapprochement with Egypt are presented as the restoration of the Kremlin’s influence that was lost after 1991.
With a receptive audience, all the Russian authorities have to do is to present the Middle East through a Soviet-era prism, even though this often has nothing to do with today’s reality. Thus, Moscow’s support for Bashar al-Assad’s regime and rapprochement with Cairo are portrayed as symbols of Russian-Arab unity in the struggle against instability caused by America and terrorism supported by its regional partners, Qatar and Saudi Arabia.
The Russian media do not mention that the Assad regime does not represent the Arabs, nor even the Syrians. They remain silent on Moscow’s responsibility, as the key diplomatic supporter of the Assad regime, for the continuing bloodshed.
Propagandists also prefer not to mention that “evil” Saudi Arabia—together with the United Arab Emirates—assisted at the birth of the new Russian-Egyptian friendship by allowing Cairo, at a time when it is dependent on Gulf financial support, to invite the Russians back.
While accusing the West of reviving the language of the Cold War, Moscow appeals to similar sentiments by resurrecting the image of the United States as the “great evil.” The situation in the Middle East, as well as the Obama administration’s mistakes in regional policy, make this task easy.
In 2011, Putin labeled the United States and the European Union “new crusaders” for their military operation in Libya. In an interview with Russian media in April, Sergey Lavrov, the foreign minister, accused Washington of being responsible for the creation of Al-Qaeda and the jihadists of the so-called Islamic State by supporting anti-Soviet mujahidin in Afghanistan in the 1980s and then invading Iraq in the 2000s.
Some pro-government analysts and journalists go further. They spread conspiracy theories along the lines that America deliberately destabilized the Middle East after the 9/11 attacks and has no real interest in stopping the bloodshed in Syria and Iraq.
The street protests that greeted Putin’s re-election for a third presidential term in 2012 compelled the Kremlin to promote the idea of a special model of governance that allegedly suits Russia better than Western democracy. Thus, Moscow’s propagandists accuse the West of trying to impose “improper” democratic values on Middle Eastern nations that had their own non-democratic but nevertheless authentic forms of governance, leading to political chaos and bloodshed.
In Libya, for example, the population was tempted by “Western fairy tales” about democracy to overthrow their authoritarian government, but got a failed state instead. Although the Russian media acknowledge that Muammar al-Qaddafi was a dictator, they argue that in exchange for political freedoms he gave his people social security and stability.
The latter argument creates parallels with ideas that were promoted in Russia prior to the 2012 presidential election: that Putin’s return to the Kremlin would mean stability, while a change in the leadership would spread havoc.
Finally, through its Middle Eastern narratives, Moscow legitimizes its policy toward Ukraine. Shortly after the beginning of the Saudi-led operation in Yemen against the Houthi rebels, the frontman of Russian propaganda, Dmitry Kiselyov, argued on state-owned Rossiya TV that there was no difference between Yemen and Ukraine. According to him, in both countries radical rebels had ousted legitimate presidents.
He posed a question: If the Saudis can support the overthrown Yemeni president, Abd Rabbu Mansour Hadi, and even bomb Yemen, then why blame Russia for supporting Viktor Yanukovych, the Ukrainian president who was forced from power by street protests?
In a similar vein, Russian propaganda compares Ukrainian nationalists fighting in the Donbas region to the jihadists of Islamic State. The presence of Muslims, including Crimean Tatars and Chechens, among Ukrainian volunteers fighting against the so-called Donetsk and Lugansk republics is served up as proof of this connection.
In this narrative, pro-Russian insurgents are waging war against global forces that represent the same challenge to international security and human values as the jihadists in Syria and Iraq. Russian rhetoric has thus elevated the civil conflict in eastern Ukraine to sacred status.
The Kremlin has come close to declaring victory in the confrontation with the West. The visit of John Kerry, the U.S. secretary of state, to Sochi in May 2015 was portrayed by the Russian media as American political surrender. The dominant theme was that the West needs Russian assistance on a number of issues, including Iran’s nuclear program and Syria’s civil conflict. Lavrov declared that Kerry’s visit marked Washington’s failure to isolate Russia.
Over the past two years there have been cases where Russian media have falsified the facts. On several occasions, Russian tabloids used photos from Syria to prove the “atrocities” of the Ukrainian forces in the Donbas region. Mostly these were the result of overzealous journalists trying to show they were on-side with the Kremlin.
In general, however, the output of Moscow’s official propagandists is cunningly contrived. They offer a selection of facts and put them in a framework that naturally leads the audience to the desired conclusions. Thus, it is hard to disagree that Islamic State represents a serious challenge to the international community and the U.S. invasion of Iraq was one of the factors that changed the geometry of regional power.
It only remains for the Kremlin to emphasize the importance of American involvement and to ignore the role of other factors in the development of the situation in Iraq after the fall of Saddam Hussein.
The Russian opposition has failed to challenge Moscow’s narratives of the Middle Eastern events. In 2014, Garry Kasparov, the chess grandmaster and prominent critic of the regime, made a clumsy attempt to blame Putin for political turmoil in the Middle East. He found no support, even in the West.
When covering the Middle East for the domestic public, Russian politicians and the media make bold, emotional statements designed to focus the audience’s attention on a simple message. Yet, so far, the Kremlin is aware of the difference between propaganda and diplomacy. Thus, while presenting Kerry’s visit to Sochi as its diplomatic victory, the Russian government understands that it needs Washington’s involvement in Syria no less than the U.S. authorities need Moscow’s.
To understand Russia’s real intentions, it is necessary to watch Moscow’s moves rather than listen to its words. But the barrier between propaganda and reality is porous. Russian experts have, for example, started to accept some propaganda statements as truth and label Saudi Arabia and Qatar as terrorist sponsors.
Yet in June, a high-level Saudi delegation, led by the son of King Salman, the deputy crown prince and defense minister Mohammed bin Salman, was received by Putin in St. Petersburg and signed a series of agreements, including on peaceful nuclear cooperation.
There is still a risk that officials will come to accept the oft-repeated lie and start to believe in a real victory over the West, not just a propaganda advantage. It is worth recalling that in a TV interview in February 2013, Lavrov stated that the Russian government was eager to teach the Americans a “lesson” in Syria that they should deal with Moscow only “on the basis of equality, balance of interests and mutual respect.” Teaching that lesson is a goal which stretches beyond the realm of propaganda.
Nikolay Kozhanov is the Academy Robert Bosch Fellow, Russia and Eurasia Programme at Chatham House, the Royal Institution of International Affairs, on whose site this article first appeared.
Read the whole story
 
· · · · ·

Dozens of Syrian Christians Missing From Town Attacked by ISIS 

1 Share
Contact with the Christians was lost after the jihadists attacked the isolated oasis town of Qariyatain in Homs Province and routed the Syrian Army.

Recap of Recent Posts at Just Security (August 1-7)

1 Share

I. Detention & Military Commissions
Jonathan Horowitz, Guest Post: The Reason Why the UK Lost the Serdar Mohammed Case (Monday, August 3) Steve Vladeck,President Obama’s Military Commissions (Monday, August 3) John Reed, Background Reading on Umm Sayyaf’s Transfer to Kurdish Authorities (Friday, August 7)
II. Surveillance & Privacy
Jennifer Granick, The Dream of Internet Freedom Doesn’t Have to Die (Wednesday, August 5)
III. Defense Department Law of War Manual
Joshua Berry, Guest Post: The DOD Law of War Manual Returns Hollow Point Bullets to Armed Conflict (Tuesday, August 4) Chris Jenks, Guest Post: A Missed Opportunity: DOD’s Law of War Manual & Applying Law as a Matter of Policy (Friday, August 7)
IV. Drones
Laura Dickinson, Guest Post: Drones and Contractor Mission Creep (Wednesday, August 5)
V. Islamic State and Syria
Michael Schmitt, It’s Complicated: The Nuance of Any US Effort to Defend Division 30 from Assad(Wednesday, August 5) Daphne Eviatar, Is al-Qaeda v Islamic State the Right Question? (Thursday, August 6)
VI.Women, Peace & Security
Fionnuala Ní Aoláin, Women, Peace and Security: A Review of the High Level Review (Thursday, August 6)
VII. Congressional Hearings
Just Security, National Security-Related Congressional Hearings, August 3–7 (Monday, August 3)Read on Just Security »
Read the whole story
 
· ·

Could a hacker gain control of DC's traffic system? - Washington Post

1 Share

Could a hacker gain control of DC's traffic system?
Washington Post
Cyberattacks have been, after all, identified as the greatest threat to U.S. national security in recent years by Director of National Intelligence James RClapper Jr. And recent reports highlight how cars can be remotely hacked through their ...

and more »

The Arab Secret Services 

1 Share
Title:                      The Arab Secret Services
Author:                 Yaacov Caroz
Caroz, Yaakov (1978). The Arab Secret Services. London: Corgi
LCCN:    79305614
UB251.A7 C3713

Subjects

Notes

  • Translation of ha-Modiʻin ha-ʻArvi.
Date Posted:      August 7, 2015
Books on Arab intelligence services are in short supply. Yaacov Caroz, a former Mossad officer, published the most recent one, this book, in 1978. Very little has been written about modern Arab intelligence services. Yaacov Caroz, a former senior official of the Mossad did write this book back in the 1970s. His book is mainly spy stories, but it largely lacks an analytic perspective. It’s also not very well organized.

 

House leader puts pressure on Kane - Scranton Times-Tribune

1 Share

STLtoday.com

House leader puts pressure on Kane
Scranton Times-Tribune
Ronald Marsico, R-105, Harrisburg, the House Judiciary Committee chairman, called on Ms. Kane to resign immediately to preserve the integrity of the attorney general's office. He said Ms. Kane would then have a fair opportunity to defend herself ...
Kathleen Kane's future in doubtAllentown Morning Call

all 269 news articles »
Next Page of Stories
Loading...
Page 2

Two Armenian Drones Shot Down Over Azerbaijan

1 Share
Azerbaijan's air defense forces shot down two Armenian drones which were on a reconnaissance mission over the Azerbaijani armed forces position, the Defense Ministry said in Baku on Friday.

Russian Defense Ministry conducts large-scale artillery exercise in western district

1 Share
Artillery units in the Western military district are to conduct training in the field to practice counter-battery fire with thousands of artillery pieces and multiple rocket launchers taking part. Drones and Zoopark radars will be used, the district's spokesman, Colonel Oleg Kochetkov told the media.

Russian Eastern Military District Gets New Air Force, Air Defense Army

1 Share
Russia has established an Air Force and Air Defense Army in its Eastern Military District that will perform exercises in the Sea of Japan and the Pacific Ocean, press-secretary for the regional command, Col. Alexander Gordeyev, said Friday.

All Bases Belong to US: New American Military Base to be Built in Poland

1 Share
The new facility is planned to be located in Mazovia Province, in the city of Ciechanow. It will be used for the needs of Polish and US troops.

Russian Hackers Suspected In E-mail Attack On U.S. Military Chiefs

1 Share
Russia is the leading suspect in a sophisticated cyber attack on the unclassified e-mail network of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, forcing the military command to shut the system down, U.S. officials said August 6.

Islamic State Executed 'Unprecedented' 2,070 Iraqis Around Mosul

1 Share
The Islamic State (IS) group has executed more than 2,000 people in and around the northern Iraqi city of Mosul since seizing it in June 2014, officials said August 7.
Next Page of Stories
Loading...
Page 3

Which makes Twitter one of the bureau's best informants. - Huffington Post

1 Share

Which makes Twitter one of the bureau's best informants.
Huffington Post
WASHINGTON -- The FBI's best informant has played a role in dozens of terrorism cases over the past several years and provided endless intelligence on extremists across the United States. The informant is young, rich, well-connected, easily ... The ...

Marijuana Prohibition Cost Al Gore the 2000 Election - Marijuana Politics (blog)

1 Share

Marijuana Prohibition Cost Al Gore the 2000 Election
Marijuana Politics (blog)
One of my stock lines on the speaking circuit is that if marijuana had been legal in 2000, Al Gore would have been our 43rd president. If 9/11/2001 had blocked your mind from recalling the events of just ten months prior, let's refresh the memory. Al ...

Why did the FBI detain Bob Graham? - Tampabay.com

1 Share

Tampabay.com

Why did the FBI detain Bob Graham?
Tampabay.com
Over eggs benedict and cheese grits, Graham updated us on his continuing fight to force theFBI to disclose reports documenting the involvement of a Saudi Arabian family that left Sarasota in great haste 11 days before terrorists attacked the World ...

Active military-grade grenade found outside McDonald's - U.S. News & World Report

1 Share

Active military-grade grenade found outside McDonald's
U.S. News & World Report
Dale Ednock, the bomb technician, told the News-Post the grenade found lodged about a foot under the pavement was there for quite some time. Ednock said it was likely a relic of themilitary base located in Thurmont, about 65 miles northwest of ...

and more »

US Navy About To Double Its LCS Fleet

1 Share
US Navy about to Double its LCS Fleet
       

GAO: USAF Nuclear Costs To Be $30B Over Next Four Years,

1 Share
A joint evaluation by the Pentagon and Energy Department estimate the Air Force's new bomber will cause a big uptick in nuclear costs
       
Next Page of Stories
Loading...
Page 4

Russia Merges AF With Missile Defense, Space Commands

1 Share
Russia has merged several branches of the military into a new Aerospace Force
       

Nine Dead In Attack On American Military Base In Kabul

1 Share
A NATO coalition soldier and eight Afghan contractors were killed in an attack on an American military base in Kabul, NATO said Saturday. It was one of three attacks to shock the capital Friday.
       

Security, Procurement Challenges Await New Turk Leaders

1 Share
Numerous security and procurement challenges have welcomed Turkey’s new military top brass,
       

We Remember: Staff Sergeant Kenneth R. Hobson II

1 Share
The Defense Intelligence Agency remembers U.S. Defense Attaché Office (USDAO) Administrative



US serviceman among 44 killed in Friday’s Kabul terror wave

1 Share
August 8, 2015, 5:21 PM (IDT)
A US military official confirmed that a US service member and eight Afghan contractors were killed in an attack on NATO’s Resolute Support mission on Camp Integrity in Kabul Friday - on one of the worst days of violence in the Afghan capital. It claimed 44 dead. A number of other NATO service members and foreign contracted civilians were among the hundreds wounded in the wave of attacks claimed by the Taliban. It included a suicide bombing on a police academy in Kabul and a truck bomb explosion that flattened a city block. 

US military reconsidering how Syrian soldiers it has trained should be put ... - Fox News

1 Share

US military reconsidering how Syrian soldiers it has trained should be put ...
Fox News
WASHINGTON – The murky aftermath of the attack on Syrian rebels last week by al-Qaida-linked militants has raised questions about how the small, ragtag group of U.S.-trained forces was sent into battle and whether the military needs to make adjustments ...

and more »
Next Page of Stories
Loading...
Page 5

Hacking For Cause: Today's Growing Cyber Security Trend - TechCrunch

1 Share

TechCrunch

Hacking For Cause: Today's Growing Cyber Security Trend
TechCrunch
Specifically, organized bad-guy hacker criminals are looking to rob banks, steal intellectual property, get your social security number, steal credit card numbers or gain your logon credentials to ultimately get to your cash — or better yet, your ...

and more »

Tyler Drumheller, 63, CIA career of 26 years - Press Herald

1 Share

Gawker

Tyler Drumheller, 63, CIA career of 26 years
Press Herald
Drumheller held posts in Africa and Europe over a 26-year career during which the CIA's focus shifted from the Cold War to terrorist threats. He rose to prominent positions at CIAheadquarters, serving as chief of the European division at a time when ...
CIA Figure in Hillary Clinton Email Scandal Dies at 63Gawker
Author of Benghazi memos sent to Clinton dies after cancer battleThe Hill

all 3 news articles »

CIA Figure in Hillary Clinton Email Scandal Dies at 63 - Gawker

1 Share
Tyler Drumheller, a former CIA officer whose whistleblowing embarrassed Bush-era intelligence gathering in Iraq, died over the weekend at 63, the Washington Post reports. Drumheller was most recently implicated in an ...

Active Military-Grade Grenade Found Outside McDonald's

1 Share
Not lovin' it: Active military-grade grenade found outside McDonald's

Genius, coward… or madman? Why Hamlet gives actors the ultimate test 

1 Share
In nearly 20 years reviewing theatre for the Observer Susannah Clapp has seen 24 wildly different interpretations of Hamlet. Benedict Cumberbatch had many examples to study before offering his own, which audiences saw last week
Here’s the rub. No one can settle what Hamlet is about. The play thought for years to be about indecisiveness is itself the subject of indecision. In 18 years as the Observer’s theatre critic I have totted up 24 productions – although I may have forgotten a couple. Some are barely recognisable as the same play. Under the influence of a determined director or a firebrand actor, the play can become – with equal conviction – a revenge tragedy, an Oedipal drama, a study of insanity, the portrait of a fatal flaw or of a molten genius.
One of the most celebrated accounts of Hamlet’s enduring grip on our imagination was given nearly two hundred years ago by William Hazlitt: “It is we who are Hamlet.” No, cried the Shakespearean biographer Hesketh Pearson. It is not identification but wish-fulfilment that is the real pull.
Continue reading...

Prosecutor: Mom Tossed 1-Month-Old From Fourth-Floor Window

1 Share
Prosecutor: NYC mom tossed 1-month-old from fourth-floor window, arrested on murder charge
Next Page of Stories
Loading...
Page 6

Cecil the lion's cub killed by rival male 

1 Share
Death of one of Cecil's eight cubs has raised fears for his remaining offspring, which could also be targeted by the large predatory male lion











Read the whole story
 
· · ·

GOP leaders say erratic attacks hurt Trump, but he vows to fight and win - Washington Post

1 Share

U.S. News & World Report

GOP leaders say erratic attacks hurt Trump, but he vows to fight and win
Washington Post
Republican leaders who have watched Donald Trump's summer surge with alarm now believe that his presidential candidacy has been contained and may begin to collapse because of his repeated attacks on a Fox News Channel star and his refusal to ...
RedState leader: 'I don't want my daughter in the room with Donald Trump'CNN
Trump is un-invited to influential RedState Gathering eventFox News
RedState Host Says Trump's Megyn Kelly Comments 'Beginning of the End'NBCNews.com
USA TODAY -Chicago Tribune -Huffington Post
all 1,684 news articles »

U.S. Military Base Attacked in Kabul

1 Share
Militants attacked a U.S. Special Operations forces base on Friday night, hours after deadly explosions targeted a Kabul police academy and an Afghan army compound.

Netanyahu's 'No' Campaign on Iran Deal Rattles Israel

1 Share
The country’s president is among those voicing concerns that the prime minister’s push to defeat the nuclear agreement will harm Israel’s ties to the U.S.

Afghan Capital Suffers Deadliest Day of Attacks in Years

1 Share
More than 50 people were killed in three separate bombings in Kabul, including a late-night attack on a U.S. forces base that left one service member dead.

Former Chief of Chile's Secret Police Dies at 86

1 Share
Manuel Contreras, a military officer who was chief of Gen. Augusto Pinochet’s feared secret police, died late Friday at age 86 at the Military Hospital of Santiago.

Next Page of Stories
Loading...
Page 7

U.N. Peacekeeper Kills Four Co-Workers in Central African Republic

1 Share
A peacekeeper in the Central African Republic shot and killed four of his fellow United Nations personnel and wounded another eight on Saturday, in the latest grisly episode for the international effort to stop religious cleansing in that country.

‘We’ve had enough’: Baghdad protests challenge Iraq’s prime minister 

1 Share
BAGHDAD — Tens of thousands of angry Iraqis took to the streets to demand changes to their government Friday in a potent challenge to Prime Minister Haidar al-Abadi from his own Shiite constituency, including the country’s powerful militias.Read full article >>









Read the whole story
 
· ·

Mexico’s economy was supposed to soar. It’s starting to flop.

1 Share
MEXICO CITY — Largely lost amid the frantic scramble after drug lord Chapo Guzman’s dramatic escape, one of the biggest leaps of faith for the Mexican economy landed with a flop.At the first auction last month to sell the rights to drill for oil in Mexico — as the country opens its oil industry to foreign investment for the first time in eight decades — the government sold just two of its 14 blocks. The disappointing showing for President Enrique Peña Nieto’s signature economic reform prompted the government this week to modify the terms of the contracts for next month’s auction, and added to what has been a noticeable string of bad news for Latin America’s second-largest economy.Read full article >>









Read the whole story
 
· ·

Hundreds of Christians Fear IS Attack, Flee Syrian Town

1 Share
Scores of Christian families have fled a Syrian town amid fears that Islamic State militants are advancing toward it and plan a major offensive, activists said Saturday. Osama Edward, director of the Christian Assyrian Network for Human Rights in Syria, said “hundreds of families” have fled the central Christian town of Sadad for the government-held central city of Homs and the capital, Damascus. “People are living in fear in the area,” Edward said. "Many Christians around Sadad...

Afghan Capital on Edge After Attacks Kill at Least 44 People

1 Share
(KABUL, Afghanistan)—A series of attacks that killed at least 44 people and wounded over 300 in one day has shattered the relative calm of Afghanistan’s capital, even as some had hoped fledgling negotiations with the Taliban and the death of their figurehead could bring peace.
The attacks Friday in Kabul marked the highest number of civilians killed and wounded in a single day, according to the United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan, which began keeping its statistics in 2009. Even Saturday, as Afghans protested the violence and donated blood to victims, people remained on edge.
“I feel danger even now, right now as we are talking,” said Kabul resident Mohammad Naeem. “And when I see the crowd of people I think maybe a suicide attack will take place with a car bomb or on a motorbike. Anything is possible.”
Since the U.S.-led invasion in 2001 that ousted the Taliban, Kabul always has been the target of insurgent attacks. But Friday’s attack included a massive truck bombing targeting a residential area in the capital that killed 15 people and wounded more than 200, something unusual. Security forces say they have thwarted a number of attempts to bring large caches of explosives into the capital and at least one truck bomb exploded this year while attempting to enter the city limits.
Friday’s two other attacks included a suicide bomber attacking recruits outside a police academy, killing at least 20 cadets and wounding 24, as well as an attack on a NATO military base near Kabul’s international airport. The NATO base attack killed one international service member and eight Afghan contractors, NATO spokesman Col. Brian Tribus said. The Afghan Interior Ministry said the assault wounded 10 local security guards, while three insurgents were killed.
NATO did not identify the nationality of the international trooper killed. The Taliban claimed the police academy attack and the NATO base assault, without mentioning the truck bombing. The insurgents often don’t claim attacks that kill women and children.
U.S. and NATO forces ended their combat mission in Afghanistan at the end of last year. In the time since, Afghan security forces have been taking record casualties in their fight against insurgents across the country.
Civilians also have suffered. A recent U.N. report shows a 1 percent increase in civilian casualties in the first six months of the year, the overwhelming majority caused by the insurgents. Almost 5,000 people were killed or wounded during that time, the report said, with the number of women and children affected by the violence up 23 and 13 percent respectively.
Meanwhile Saturday in eastern Nangarhar province, a roadside bomb killed a traffic police officer and a civilian and wounded three near a checkpoint in Surkh Rod district, authorities said.
President Ashraf Ghani promised to retaliate against the perpetrators and linked the Kabul attacks to the recent announcement by his government that Taliban figurehead Mullah Mohammad Omar had been dead for more than two years.
The appointment of Mullah Omar’s replacement, Mullah Akhtar Mansoor, has sparked dissent within the Taliban. That’s also raised questions about the peace process that Ghani has made pivotal to his presidency. After a series of informal talks, a first formal, face-to-face round of negotiations was held in Pakistan on July 7. The announcement of Mullah Omar’s death saw future talks cancelled.
However, many seem to take Friday’s bombings as a message that the Taliban won’t quit fighting — and that Kabul remains a major target.
“Since the death of Mullah Omar, explosions are still happening,” Kabul resident Mohammed Zahir said. “These problems have increased and we can’t expect anything from the government.”
Later Saturday, hundreds gathered at a candlelight vigil in memory of those who died. Many blamed Pakistan, long suspected of harboring insurgents, for allowing the attacks in Kabul to take place. They burned Pakistani currency with the candles lit to remember the dead.
“Our nation is in mourning,” said Aryan Afghan, who took part in the vigil.
Read the whole story
 
· · ·

'Turkish airstrikes killed my siblings while I fought Isil'

1 Share
Mamend Rasul describes devastation brought to Iraqi Kurdish village by Turkish airstrikes against PKK











Read the whole story
 
· · ·
Next Page of Stories
Loading...
Page 8

Russia backs UN resolution investigating Syrian chemical weapons in rare show of unity 

1 Share
Resolution seeks to assign blame for deadly chemical weapon attack in August 2013 that killed hundreds in Damascus suburb of Ghouta











Read the whole story
 
· · ·

Manuel Contreras, Chilean Spy Chief, Dies at 86

1 Share
Gen. Contreras, Chile’s intelligence chief during the dictatorship of Gen. Augusto Pinochet, was serving 526 years of multiple prison terms for human rights violations.

Republicans chastise Trump over Megyn Kelly comments

1 Share
GOP candidates defend Fox News debate moderator after billionaire makes new controversial comments

Turkey-Kurdish conflict: PKK distracted by Turkish bombs as it continues fight against Isis

1 Share
In a guerrilla camp to the south-west of Irbil in Kurdish Iraq, fighters from the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) huddle on sofas in a darkened room, some bearing scars from the war with Islamic State (Isis). That morning the Islamists sent a rocket whizzing towards the nearby town of Makhmour, killing one civilian and injuring two.










Read the whole story
 
· ·

Stephen Harper: Canadian Prime Minister accused of taking country too far to the right

1 Share
Secretive, vindictive and patronising are not words in keeping with the popular stereotype of Canadians. Yet that’s how citizens of the world’s second-largest country are increasingly portraying the Prime Minister, Stephen Harper, these days.










The Latest: Pennsylvania prosecutor arraigned on charges

1 Share
NORRISTOWN, Pa. (AP) -- The latest in the arraignment of Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane (all times local):...
Next Page of Stories
Loading...
Page 9

The Latest: Vermont police investigate 4 deaths

1 Share
BERLIN, Vt. (AP) -- The latest in the investigation into four deaths in Vermont, including a state child protection worker (all times local):...

Officials: 3 dead are related to Vermont shooting suspect

1 Share
BERLIN, Vt. (AP) -- Three women found dead in a Vermont home on Saturday are related to a woman arrested a day earlier in the fatal shooting of a state social worker, state police said....

Is Obama a "Russian project"? - Google Search

1 Share

VIDEO - Alfred Webre: Positive Timeline, BRICS, Money ...

exopolitics.blogs.com/.../an-exercise-in-the-socratic-method-the-positive-...
Nov 15, 2014 - However this may be a dialectic if Obama is a long-term Russian Project to bring down and destroy the American Republic, for which there is  ...

Project Pegasus | Our New World

lightworker29501.com/tag/project-pegasus/
However this may be a dialectic if Obama is a long-term Russian Project to bring down and destroy the American Republic, for which there is ample evidence  ...

Kabul on Edge After Wave of Attacks Kills 50