Sunday, April 24, 2016

Clinton, Trump stream ahead as rivals show signs of fading - Washington Post Sunday April 24th, 2016 at 3:56 PM

Clinton, Trump stream ahead as rivals show signs of fading - Washington Post

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Washington Post

Clinton, Trump stream ahead as rivals show signs of fading
Washington Post
PROVIDENCE, R.I. — Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump surged Sunday toward another round of pivotal presidential primaries as their party leaders faced new questions about internal divisions that could complicate their nominees' general election chances.
Donald Trump Jr. “Ted Cruz has no chance of winning this without bribing the delegates.”CNN (blog)
Face the Nation transcripts April 24, 2016: Kasich, SandersCBS News
Cruz stays in the Republican presidential fight by quietly scoring delegatesFox News
USA TODAY -Fox News Latino -NBCNews.com -Salon
all 1,293 news articles »

Fighting erupts in Iraq, and the Islamic State isn't part of it - Washington Post

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Washington Post

Fighting erupts in Iraq, and the Islamic State isn't part of it
Washington Post
BAGHDAD — Kurdish troops and Iraqi Shiite forces exchanged mortar and machine-gun fire Sunday, in a flare-up that killed at least 12 people and raised concerns about the state's ability to control an array of armed militia groups as areas are freed ...
Ceasefire in northern Iraq after Kurd-Shi'ite clashes kill 12Reuters
Iraqi Kurdish Peshmerga, Shiite Militia Clash in Northern IraqWall Street Journal
Kurds and Shiite militias, uneasy allies in ISIS fight, clash in northern IraqKTVQ Billings News
Middle East Online
all 32 news articles »

In Chernobyl, an Arch Caps 30 Years of Work to Contain Nuclear Fallout

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At the site of the world’s worst nuclear accident, a workforce of around 2,500 people is finishing a massive steel enclosure that will cover and contain the radioactive innards of the reactor that exploded in April 1986.

В США подросток устроил стрельбу на школьной вечеринке - Росбалт.RU

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Росбалт.RU

В США подросток устроил стрельбу на школьной вечеринке
Росбалт.RU
Два человека ранены, сам злоумышленник получил смертельное ранение, сообщает телеканал ABC News со ссылкой на полицию. Инцидент произошел в городе Антиго около 11 вечера субботы по местному времени (07:00 воскресенья мск). «Подозреваемый подошел к зданию школы ...
В США погиб подросток, утроивший стрельбу на выпускном вечереРоссийская Газета
В США полицейские застрелили школьника, открывшего огонь на выпускной вечеринкеМосковский комсомолец
Подросток устроил стрельбу на выпускной вечеринке школьников в СШАКапитал страны
Вести.Ru -Федеральное агентство новостей No.1 -Газета.Ru -РИА Новости Украина
Все похожие статьи: 29 »

Порошенко заявил о договоренностях с Кремлем по обмену Савченко - BBC Russian

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Зеркало недели

Порошенко заявил о договоренностях с Кремлем по обмену Савченко
BBC Russian
Президент Украины Петр Порошенко заявил, что Надежда Савченко может вернуться в Украину в течение нескольких недель. В интервью украинским телеканалам он заявил, что об этом удалось договориться во время последнего телефонного разговора с президентом России ...
Порошенко ожидает возвращения Савченко в течение нескольких недельГазета.Ru
Порошенко ждет назначения нового генпрокурора Украины после 10 маяРИА Новости
Порошенко надеется, что Савченко вернется на Украину в течение нескольких недельРосбалт.RU
ИА REGNUM -Интерфакс -Вести.Ru -Slon.ru - Редакция деловых новостей
Все похожие статьи: 52 »

Iowa Sen. Chuck Grassley thinks FBI may leak Hillary Clinton private email investigation - New York Daily News

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New York Daily News

Iowa Sen. Chuck Grassley thinks FBI may leak Hillary Clinton private email investigation
New York Daily News
Iowa Sen. Chuck Grassley suggested that the FBI may leak reports of its investigation into presidential candidate Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server as secretary of state, according to reports. Grassley, a Republican, appeared to suggest ...
Sen. Chuck Grassley: FBI Could Leak Clinton Email InvestigationNewsmax
Grassley: FBI could leak details from Clinton email probeThe Hill
Senator Investigating Clinton Emails Says FBI Could Possibly Leak InfoDaily Caller
Hot Air -PoliticusUSA
all 28 news articles »
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Sen. Grassley: FBI Will Leak Clinton Investigation If Politics Gets in Way - LawNewz

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LawNewz

Sen. Grassley: FBI Will Leak Clinton Investigation If Politics Gets in Way
LawNewz
Republican Senator Chuck Grassley suggested on Friday that the FBI would leak their investigation into Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton's email scandal if politics hindered them. “Is there going to be political interference?” Grassley ...
Iowa Sen. Chuck Grassley thinks FBI may leak Hillary Clinton private email investigationNew York Daily News
Sen. Chuck Grassley: FBI Could Leak Clinton Email InvestigationNewsmax
Grassley: FBI could leak details from Clinton email probeThe Hill
Hot Air -Daily Caller -PoliticusUSA
all 29 news articles »

Sanders: My Support for Clinton ‘Totally Dependent’ on How Far Left She Goes 

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Sen. Bernie Sanders (I., Vt.) said his potential support for Hillary Clinton is “totally dependent” on how progressive she is during an interview Sunday on ABC’s This Week. .
“If the contest doesn’t go the way you hope, will you be able to follow the Clinton model of 2008, which she talked about on the GMA town hall this week, and make an enthusiastic case for her the way she pushed for President Obama?” host George Stephanopoulos asked in the clip flagged bythe Washington Post.
“Well, that is totally dependent on what the Clinton platform is and how she responds to the needs of millions of Americans who are sick and tired of establishment politics and establishment economics,” Sanders said. “You know, I can’t snap my finger and tell people what to do.
“What I will do is do everything that I can to make sure that somebody like a Donald Trump, or some other right-wing Republican does not become President of the United States. We do not need more tax breaks for billionaires, more cuts to Social Security, Medicare or ignoring the fact, Republicans don’t even accept the reality of climate change, let alone being prepared to do something about it. So I will do everything that I can to defeat any Republican candidate.
“If Secretary Clinton is the nominee, she is going to have to make the case to the American people, not just to my supporters, but all Americans, that she is prepared to stand up to the billionaire class, she is prepared to fight for health care for all Americans, that she is prepared to pass paid family and medical leave, make sure that college is affordable for the young people in this country. That is what she has got to do and I hope, if she is the nominee, that she does that well.”

Shelling in northern Syria intensifies between regime forces and rebels

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Heavy shelling killed at least 43 people in Syria’s northern city of Aleppo over the weekend, further straining the nearly two-month-long cease-fire and undermining the nascent peace process in Geneva.
     

US’ essential global leadership role - Opinion

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The economic, political and security strategy that the United States has pursued for more than seven decades, under Democratic and Republican administrations alike, is today widely questioned by large segments of the American public and is under attack by leading political candidates in both parties.
Many Americans no longer seem to value the liberal international order that the United States created after World War II and sustained throughout the Cold War and beyond. Or perhaps they take it for granted and have lost sight of the essential role the United States plays in supporting the international environment from which they benefit greatly.
The unprecedented prosperity made possible by free and open markets and thriving international trade; the spread of democracy; and the avoidance of major conflict among great powers — all these remarkable accomplishments have depended on sustained U.S. engagement around the world. Yet politicians in both parties dangle before the public the vision of an America freed from the burdens of leadership.
What these politicians don’t say, perhaps because they don’t understand it themselves, is that the price of ending our engagement would far outweigh its costs.
The international order created by the United States today faces challenges greater than at any time since the height of the Cold War. Rising authoritarian powers in Asia and Europe threaten to undermine the security structures that have kept the peace since World War II.
Russia invaded Ukraine and has seized some of its territory. In East Asia, an increasingly aggressive China seeks to control the sea lanes through which a large share of global commerce flows. In the Middle East, Iran pursues hegemony by supporting Hezbollah and Hamas and the bloody tyranny in Syria. The Islamic State controls more territory than any terrorist group in history, brutally imposing its extreme vision of Islam and striking at targets throughout the Middle East, North Africa and Europe.
None of those threats will simply go away. Nor will the United States be spared if the international order collapses, as it did twice in the 20th century. In the 21st century, oceans provide no security. Nor do walls along borders. Nor would cutting off the United States from the international economy by trashing trade agreements and erecting barriers to commerce.
Instead of following the irresponsible counsel of demagogues, we need to restore a bipartisan foreign policy consensus around renewing U.S. global leadership. Despite predictions of a “post-American world,” U.S. capacities remain considerable. The U.S. economy remains the most dynamic in the world. The widely touted “rise of the rest” — the idea that the United States was being overtaken by the economies of Brazil, Russia, India and China — has proved to be a myth.
The dollar remains the world’s reserve currency, and people across the globe seek U.S. investment and entrepreneurial skills to help their flagging economies. U.S. institutions of higher learning remain the world’s best and attract students from every corner of the globe. The political values that the United States stands for remain potent forces for change.
Even at a time of resurgent autocracy, popular demands for greater freedom can be heard in Russia, China, Iran and elsewhere, and those peoples look to the United States for support, both moral and material. And our strategic position remains strong. The United States has more than 50 allies and partners around the world. Russia and China between them have no more than a handful.
The task ahead is to play on these strengths and provide the kind of leadership that many around the world seek and that the American public can support. For the past two years, under the auspices of the World Economic Forum, we have worked with a diverse, bipartisan group of Americans and representatives from other countries to put together the broad outlines of a strategy for renewed U.S. leadership.
There is nothing magical about our proposals. The strategies to sustain the present international order are much the same as the strategies that created it. But they need to be adapted and updated to meet new challenges and take advantage of new opportunities. For instance, one prime task today is to strengthen the international economy, from which the American people derive so many benefits. That means passing trade agreements that strengthen ties between the U.S. and the vast economies of East Asia and Europe.
Contrary to what demagogues in both parties claim, ordinary Americans stand to gain significantly from the recently negotiated Trans-Pacific Partnership. According to the Peterson Institute for International Economics, the agreement will increase annual real incomes in the U.S. by $131 billion.
The U.S. also needs to work to reform existing international institutions, such as the International Monetary Fund, so that rising economic powers such as China feel a greater stake in them, while also working with new institutions such as the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank to ensure that they reinforce rather than undermine liberal economic norms.
The revolution in energy, which has made the U.S. one of the world’s leading suppliers, offers another powerful advantage. With the right mix of policies, the U.S. could help allies in Europe and Asia diversify their sources of supply and thus reduce their vulnerability to Russian manipulation. Nations such as Russia and Iran that rely heavily on hydrocarbon exports would be weakened, as would the OPEC oil cartel. The overall result would be a relative increase in our power and ability to sustain the order.
The world has come to recognize that education, creativity and innovation are key to prosperity, and most see the United States as a leader in these areas. Other nations want access to the American market, American finance and American innovation. Businesspeople around the world seek to build up their own Silicon Valleys and other U.S.-style centers of entrepreneurship.
The U.S. government can do a better job of working with the private sector in collaborating with developing countries. And Americans need to be more, not less, welcoming to immigrants. Students studying at our world-class universities, entrepreneurs innovating in our high-tech incubators and immigrants searching for new opportunities for their families strengthen the United States and show the world the opportunities offered by democracy.
Finally, the United States needs to do more to reassure allies that it will be there to back them up if they face aggression. Would-be adversaries need to know that they would do better by integrating themselves into the present international order than by trying to undermine it.
Accomplishing that, however, requires ending budget sequestration and increasing spending on defense and on all the other tools of international affairs. That investment would be more than paid for by the global security it would provide.
All these efforts are interrelated, and, indeed, a key task for responsible political leaders will be to show how the pieces fit together: how trade enhances security, how military power undergirds prosperity and how providing access to American education strengthens the forces dedicated to a more open and freer world.
Above all, Americans need to be reminded what is at stake. Many millions around the world have benefited from an international order that has raised standards of living, opened political systems and preserved the general peace. But no nation and no people have benefited more than Americans. And no nation has a greater role to play in preserving this system for future generations.
Ivo Daalder, U.S. ambassador to NATO from 2009 to 2013, is president of the Chicago Council on Global Affairs. Robert Kagan is a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and a contributing columnist for The Washington Post.
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· · · · ·

US’ essential global leadership role

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The U.S. needs to do more to reassure allies that it will be there to back them up if they face aggression. Would-be adversaries need to know that they would do better by integrating themselves into the present international order than by trying to undermine it.
     

Obama praises Germany for accepting Syrian refugees

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Under fire at home for his program to accept 10,000 Syrian refugees this year, President Obama said Sunday that he is "proud" of German Chancellor Angela Merkel and the people of Germany for accepting far more migrants from the war-torn country.
In response to a reporter's question noting that Republican ...
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FBI, DEA produce documentary warning teens about heroin - Chicago Tribune

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Chicago Tribune

FBI, DEA produce documentary warning teens about heroin
Chicago Tribune
The video, "Chasing the Dragon: The Life of an Opiate Addict," is available online, and the FBIand DEA are trying to get schools to incorporate it into their lesson plans. It's a sign that the feds are adding new tools to their law enforcement ...

Report: Mexican police tortured suspects in students' case

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MEXICO CITY (AP) - There is strong evidence that Mexican police tortured some of the key suspects arrested in the disappearance of 43 students, according to a report released Sunday by an outside group of experts.
The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights expert group says that a study of 17 ...

Donald Trump could use his 'celebrity' to persuade uncommitted delegates - CNN

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CNN

Donald Trump could use his 'celebrity' to persuade uncommitted delegates
CNN
Washington (CNN) Donald Trump's plans to lobby uncommitted delegates and shore up his foreign policy credentials, John Kasich's long view and how Senate Democrats are prepping (their ad dollars) for November: it's all a part of our "Inside Politics" ...
Meet the Press - April 24, 2016NBCNews.com
Clinton Can't Rely on Trump's UnpopularityNew York Times
Voters' 'Bernie or Bust' efforts persist despite Sanders' vow not to be another Ralph NaderLos Angeles Times
Washington Post -Fox News -Wall Street Journal (blog) -Newsweek
all 988 news articles »

Face the Nation transcripts April 24, 2016: Kasich, Sanders - CBS News

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CBS News

Face the Nation transcripts April 24, 2016: Kasich, Sanders
CBS News
JOHN DICKERSON, CBS HOST: Today on FACE THE NATION: Donald Trump's campaign manager promises a new Donald Trump, but Donald Trump seems to like the old one. The Republican front-runner was in full form on the campaign trail yesterday in ...

and more »

April 24, 2016

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A look at the best news photos from around the world.

Highlights of experts’ report on Mexican missing students

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The final report by a group of experts of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights has found serious abuses and inconsistencies in the Mexican government’s investigation into the disappearance of 43 students who were kidnapped by corrupt local police in September 2014 and supposedly turned over to a drug gang that killed them and burned their bodies.
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The Rise and Deadly Fall of Islamic State's Oil Tycoon

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A document trove tells how Abu Sayyaf faced challenges familiar to all oil executives—and some unique to a terrorist group, such as approving expenses for the upkeep of slaves and dodging U.S. airstrikes.

Experts say Mexico hampered probe into apparent student massacre

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MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - A panel of international experts on Sunday accused Mexico's government of failing to fully cooperate with their probe into the fate of 43 trainee teachers apparently massacred in 2014, the most notorious human rights case in Mexico in recent years.
  

Int'l Investigators Empty-Handed After Mexico Mass Disappearance Inquiry 

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A year-long independent investigation into the disappearance of 43 students in Mexico has failed to determine what happened to the young men, in the face of what researched call "obstructions" by government authorities. A five-member panel appointed by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights -- an autonomous arm of the Organization of American States -- issued its final report Sunday, in a case that has rocked the country and drawn international attention. The team...

Grim realities on the ground in Ukraine two years into new regime 

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From: PBSNewsHour
Duration: 10:26

Ukraine has faced many challenges in the two years since violent protests drove the country’s president from office. The Russian occupation of the Crimean Peninsula in particular sparked a military conflict between pro-Russian secessionists and Ukraine’s government. Correspondent Kira Kay and Producer Jason Maloney from the Bureau for International Reporting take us inside Ukraine to asses the country’s struggle for political change and stability.

Lessons learned from political campaign fiascos

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From: FoxNewsChannel
Duration: 04:36

A look back at the biggest blunders made by past presidential hopefuls

Back pain the leading cause of disability in Americans

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From: FoxNewsChannel
Duration: 04:06

This condition sends nearly 13 million people to their doctors each year
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President Obama Holds a Press Conference with Chancellor Merkel 

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From: whitehouse
Duration: 47:42

Hannover, Germany

President Obama Speaks at the Hannover Messe Trade Fair

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From: whitehouse
Duration: 12:52

Hannover, Germany

Is Trump benefiting from the system he calls rigged?

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From: FoxNewsChannel
Duration: 05:21

Authors Penny Nance and Emily Miller debate

Obama: Merkel on the 'right side of history' 

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From: CNN
Duration: 00:47

President Barack Obama praised German Chancellor Angela Merkel for her work with refugees in Europe, saying she's on the right side of history.

AP Top Stories 24 P 

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From: AssociatedPress
Duration: 00:54

Here are the top stories for Sunday, April 24th: Obama arrives in Germany; Shooting at Wisconsin prom; Kathmandu vigil; Astronaut runs marathon in space.
Stay up to date with daily round ups: http://smarturl.it/APTopStories
Subscribe for more Breaking News: http://smarturl.it/AssociatedPress
The Associated Press is the essential global news network, delivering fast, unbiased news from every corner of the world to all media platforms and formats.
AP’s commitment to independent, comprehensive journalism has deep roots. Founded in 1846, AP has covered all the major news events of the past 165 years, providing high-quality, informed reporting of everything from wars and elections to championship games and royal weddings. AP is the largest and most trusted source of independent news and information.
Today, AP employs the latest technology to collect and distribute content - we have daily uploads covering the latest and breaking news in the world of politics, sport and entertainment. Join us in a conversation about world events, the newsgathering process or whatever aspect of the news universe you find interesting or important. Subscribe: http://smarturl.it/AssociatedPress

Why does Trump dominate 2016? 

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From: FoxNewsChannel
Duration: 03:26

How he drives the coverage
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A U.S.-U.K. Trade Deal Could Take a Decade, Obama Says

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An exclusively British trade deal with the U.S. could take as long as a decade to negotiate, said President Barack Obama, reaffirming his preference for the country to remain part of the European Union.

Egypt's Sisi Calls for Unity Ahead of Planned Protests

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Egyptian President Abdel Fattah Al Sisi urged citizens to stand united against “forces of evil” seeking to destabilize the country, a day before more planned protests against his ceding of two Red Sea islands to Saudi Arabia.

Obama Expresses Skepticism Over North Korean Offer

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President Barack Obama said the U.S. is analyzing North Korea’s most recent provocative actions, but gave little credence to a new overture from Pyongyang.

Trump Vows Continued Support for Anti-immigrant Stances

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Billionaire real estate mogul Donald Trump, trying to lock down the U.S. Republican presidential nomination, said he continues to believe in his anti-immigrant proposals, even as questions emerge about his authenticity. One of his key campaign aides, Paul Manafort, told party leaders last week that Trump has been playing "a part" in the campaign and that he is "evolving" into a more traditional presidential candidate. But the brash Trump assured a rally of cheering...

Obama: Russia Sanctions Must Remain Until Moscow Complies With Minsk Deal 

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U.S. President Barack Obama says he and German Chancellor Angela Merkel agree that Ukraine-related sanctions targeting Russia should only be lifted if Moscow complies with a deal to end fighting between Kyiv's forces and Russia-backed separatists.

Beijing Allows Chinese Living in Regions Bordering Russia to Have Three Children 

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Paul Goble

            Staunton, April 21 – The Chinese government’s decision to rescind its one-child policy and allow Chinese parents to have two children has attracted attention around the world; its concurrent decision reported this weekend to allow Chinese living in regions bordering Russia to have three children is likely to attract even  more attention in that country.

            Today, South China Insight, a Russian-language portal featuring news from China, reported that Beijing has decided to allow couples living in regions along the Russian border to have three children and not just two as is the case with some exceptions in the rest of the People’s Republic (south-insight.com/node/218173).

            If that leads to a population boom in these border areas either because Chinese already there decide to have three children or other Chinese move in to take advantage of this exception, some in Russia are likely to view this as yet another demographic threat from China, whose population density in border areas is already far higher than in the Russian Federation.

            Obviously, this is a long-term challenge given that few of those born under this new Beijing policy would come of age before 2040; but even that will be enough to raise questions in Russian minds about China’s intentions toward Siberia and the Russian Far East and about Vladimir Putin’s tilt away from Europe and toward China.


               
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Russians Will Stop Supporting Putin Only When They See His Weakness, Yakovenko Says 

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Paul Goble

            Staunton, April 24 – Given the longstanding servility of the Russian people, Vladimir Putin can be deprived of popular support only by showing how weak he in fact is, according to commentator, something that requires the opposition within Russia to unite and the West to reduce to a minimum any contacts with him.

            In Chicago’s Russian-émigré newspaper, “Seven Days,” Yakovenko begins by observing that those who filed denunciations in Stalin’s time and those who asked questions of Putin during his last open line program fell into the same three categories (7days.us/xolujstvo-bez-straxa-i-upreka/).

            Some in both cases turned to the authorities to advance their own interests. Some asked what could only be described as disinterested and unselfish questions. And some – and Yakovenko suggests this was especially the case with those asking questions of Putin – were driven by servility, by a desire to please those above them.

            That may surprise some because “there is a great temptation to distinguish servility ‘from fear’ of the times of Stalinism and those of the current Putin servility, when without being servile one could live and no one would be at risk of being shot or imprisoned.”  But people forget that “Stalinist servility was maintained not by fear alone.”

            As the Harvard Project documented with its interviews with Russian DPs after World War II, even former Soviet citizens who were now beyond the reach of Stalin’s forces of coercion nonetheless “in their overwhelming majority remained within the framework of the culture of servility with its cult of the leader and slavish humbling of themselves before it.”

            Yakovenko suggests that the reason for this is to be found in the concept of ur-servility, one he develops on the basis of an analogy with ur-fascism as described by Umberto Eco. And he then argues is “a trans-era phenomenon of Russian life and Russian daily life and political culture.”

            That ur-servility is very much “an attribute of Russian culture” and that it remains a “vital” element within it is shown by the fact that “a significant portion of the emigres who left the USSR in the 1980s and Russia in the 1990s and live today in the countries of Europe and the US are devoted supporters of Putin, support all his adventures, including the theft of Crimea, the war against Ukraine and the mass murder of citizens of Syria.”

            Moreover, he continues, “a significant part of the Russian community of Israel consists of Putin adepts and supporters of his policies and the system he has established,” even if they have been in that country for decades and even if that is against their own interests as Israelis given that Putin is supporting enemies of the Jewish state.

            One can say the same thing about many Russian emigres in Europe and the United States, Yakovenko says. They are largely beyond the reach of Putin’s security organs, and thus they manifest what can only be called “servility without fear or reproach.” How long it will take to overcome such ur-servility will determine Russia’s fate.

            “Émigré ur-servile Putinism is something absolutely irrational and directed against the interests of its bearers,” who “just like the Putinists in Israel are destroying their own home” by continuing to follow its dictates, Yakovenko says.

            He continues by observing that “the opposite side of ur-servility always is doublethink. These are two parts of a single political and daily-life culture.” The difference between Soviet times and now is that in the USSR, there was an ideology and that meant people could play by the system’s rules in public and then go home, tell anecdotes and listen to foreign radios.

            “In Putin’s Russia,” however, Yakovenko argues, “there is no ideology and doublethink means in the main the difference between real and declared behavior,” as when the Russian elite denounces the West but sends its children to school there.

            What is in common between the two is that the servile Russian “recognizes not the truth of ideas but the truth of force.”  And that means that he can’t be led to change his mind by being given new information; he will become different only if he decides that the person he had taken his lead from no longer is powerful but instead fundamentally weak.
Read the whole story
 
· · ·

Black votes matter – always have for Clintons

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Hillary Clinton shares none of Barack Obama’s sparkle, but she has more than paid her dues and black voters have rewarded her loyalty.
     

Britons Who Fought IS Freed From Iraqi Jail

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British citizens Joe Akerman and Jac Holmes and Irishman Joshua Molloy, were jailed after leaving the frontline to come home.

Germany's Merkel says truce in eastern Ukraine not being respected

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HANOVER, Germany (Reuters) - German Chancellor Angela Merkel said on Sunday that a ceasefire in eastern Ukraine was not stable, adding that she and U.S. President Barack Obama had discussed ways to ensure the Minsk peace deal is implemented.
  

Hillary Clinton FBI Investigation: In Potential Nightmare Scenario For Democrats, FBI Indictment Could Come After ... - The Inquisitr

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The Inquisitr

Hillary Clinton FBI Investigation: In Potential Nightmare Scenario For Democrats, FBI Indictment Could Come After ...
The Inquisitr
Hillary Clinton is on a path to win the Democratic nomination, but the looming FBI investigation and the possibility of an indictment against the former Secretary of State is casting a pall over the race that could end up sending the Democratic Party ...
Judge Napolitano: FBI Has 'Overwhelming' Amount of Evidence Against Clinton, Enough for an Indictment and ConvictionTheBlaze.com 
Pressure growing on FBI to release Clinton findingsFox News

Fox's Judge Napolitano Claims FBI has 'Overwhelming' Evidence to Indict and Convict ClintonLawNewz 
BizPac Review-
 Town Hall-Western Journalism 

all 21 news articles »

9/11 Commission: No Saudi smoking gun 

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The men who led the official investigation into the September 11 attacks are fighting back against charges their commission did not delve deep enough into Saudi Arabia's involvement.
More than a decade after the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States filed its report, a new push has ...
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Page 8

This German village wants to be known for wine. Instead, it's Trump

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The Bergholds own the Trump Haus, where Donald Trump's grandfather, Friedrich, lived before leaving for America in 1885. The shots of the gate that show up on TV and in tweets around the world leave Berghold feeling a little violated.
     

US military chief pays a visit to Cairo as the Sinai militancy intensifies - Washington Post

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Washington Post

US military chief pays a visit to Cairo as the Sinai militancy intensifies
Washington Post
CAIRO — Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr., the top U.S. military officer, made his second trip to Egypt in two months this weekend, a visit that underscored growing concern about Islamic State-linked militants and ongoing efforts to address friction in the ...

and more »

Overseas, Obama begins the long goodbye

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Back home, President Barack Obama has eight months, a dogfight over the Supreme Court and scores of campaign speeches for a successor ahead of him. But overseas, the president already has begun a long, slow goodbye.
     

Assad refused offer to move to Tehran, Iranian minister says

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April 24, 2016, 10:16 AM (IDT)
Mahmoud Alavi, Iran's minister of intelligence, said Saturday that his country had offered Syrian President Bashar Assad the option of moving with his family from Damascus to Iran so he could lead his regime's war against the rebels from there. According to Alawi, Assad responded that "his family was like any other Syrian family" so it would remain in the capital.  

Turkish-Dutch journalist detained over Erdogan tweet

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Turkish authorities have launched close to 2,000 lawsuits against people accused of insulting Erdogan.
     

ISIS said to capture part of strategic city of Deir ez-Zor from Syrian army

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April 24, 2016, 11:11 AM (IDT)
DEBKAfile's military sources said Sunday that ISIS captured the Sinaa neighborhood of the strategic city of Deir ez-Zor from the Syrian army this weekend. They added that Syrian soldiers who were caught by the ISIS forces were hanged in the city's central square.
The fighting over Deir az-Zor is considered the decisive battle for control of eastern Syria and the main roads leading to the Euphrates valley and from there to western Iraq. The Russian air force is making great efforts to stop ISIS in eastern Syria and prevent the collapse of the Syrian forces.
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White House poised to release secret pages from 9/11 inquiry

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The Obama administration will likely soon release at least part of a 28-page secret chapter from a congressional inquiry into 9/11 that may shed light on possible Saudi connections to the attackers.
     

Military needs effective social media ops

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Without this critical first step, the United States will continue to fall behind its foes in producing a constructive narrative.
     

Spreading Wahhabism at heart of Saudi problem

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Now that the United States is no longer dependent on Riyadh for oil, U.S. officials feel free to vent the pent-up anger that has been building for years.
     

What's it really like to be a CIA spy? - BGR

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BGR

What's it really like to be a CIA spy?
BGR
Hosted by Doug Laux, author of the newly published book Left of Boom: How a Young CIA Case Officer Penetrated the Taliban and Al-Qaeda, the AMA is definitely a fun read. Laux explains what he did for the CIA, how he signed up for service, how he kept ...

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M.N.: "Who owns the Russian language?" After the century of bloody revolutions, endless and continuing waves of emigration, Gulag and cultural decline, it is the World that owns the Russian language. Russia just rents it out. - Headlines Review - 10:39 AM 4/24/2016 

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M.N.: "Who owns the Russian language?" 
After the century of bloody revolutions, endless and continuing waves of emigration, Gulag and cultural decline, it is the World and the Russian speaking community outside Russia that owns and sustains the Russian language and Russian cultural heritage. Russia just rents it out. 

Paul Goble

            Staunton, April 23 – The bilingual Ukrainian poet Sergey Zhadan, who writes exclusively in Ukrainian, says that Russia “for the first time in its history has lost the monopoly on its own language,” a development that many in Russia find hard to accept and that even more in Ukraine see as a factor in the development of their country.
            Aleksey Tsvetkov, a Russian poet, notes that “more than once” he has heard others say the same thing and that Zhadan’s observation is important both in explaining Vladimir Putin’s anger and the implications for Russia of a truly independent Ukraine (inliberty.ru/blog/2303-Komu-prinadlezhit-yazyk).
                According to Tsvetkov, the issue of “who owns the Russian language” has always been resolved in Russia by silent acquiescence, with most Russians passively assuming that “the language belonged to the empire and that anyone who uses does so … as it were by a license extended to him from the center.”



Obama’s farewell visit resembled a tour of the wreckage not only of decades of efforts to give the region an anchor of stability but also of his own illusions.

Obama says he is practicing 21st century diplomacy. Maybe. But others, notably in the world’s most unstable and dangerous zone, everyone else is engaged in 19th century diplomacy of the deadliest kind.

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Dutch journalist who criticized Erdogan detained in Turkey: official | Reuters – The New York Web Times – newyorkwebtimes.com

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A prominent Dutch journalist has been detained by Turkish police, a Dutch official said on Sunday, a week after she wrote a column published in the Netherlands in which she criticized President Tayyip Erdogan for his clampdown on dissent.
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