Tuesday, May 3, 2016

Ted Cruz Suspends Presidential Campaign by Morgan Chalfant Tuesday May 3rd, 2016 at 9:20 PM

Ted Cruz Suspends Presidential Campaign 

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Sen. Ted Cruz (R., Texas) suspended his presidential campaign Tuesday evening following disappointing results out of Indiana.
The news first broke on social media Tuesday ahead of Cruz’s remarks from Indianapolis.
“From the beginning, I’ve said that I would continue on as long as there was a viable path to victory,” Cruz said. “Tonight, I’m sorry to say, it appears that path has been foreclosed. Together, we left it all on the field in Indiana.”
While he suspended his campaign, Cruz emphasized that he was not “suspending our fight for liberty.”
Cruz’s announcement came less than two hours after Donald Trump, the GOP frontrunner, was declared the winner in the Indiana primary in a landslide.
Cruz has sought to gain momentum following disappointing results out of the “Acela primary” one week ago, naming Carly Fiorina as his prospective running mate and insisting that Trump would not make it to the 1,237 delegate count he needs to capture the nomination outright.
He thanked his family, Carly Fiorina, and his supporters during his speech Tuesday night.
The decision to exit by Cruz, Trump’s chief rival for the nomination, will all but clear the way for Trump to capture the Republican nomination for president. The campaign for Ohio Gov. John Kasich, who has won only his home state, said Tuesday that he would remain in the race.
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Ted Cruz ends his bid for Republican presidential nomination

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Texas Sen. Ted Cruz ended his presidential campaign Tuesday, eliminating the biggest impediment to Donald Trump's march to the Republican nomination.
     

Ted Cruz ends his bid for Republican presidential nomination

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INDIANAPOLIS (AP) -- Texas Sen. Ted Cruz ended his presidential campaign Tuesday, eliminating the biggest impediment to Donald Trump's march to the Republican nomination....

Strategist: Tim Kaine would be best Clinton VP choice 

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From: CNN
Duration: 00:47

Democratic strategist Bob Beckel says that Sen. Tim Kaine would be the best choice for Hillary Clinton's running mate.

Relatives of Western jihadist fighters go public, hoping to stop others 

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From: PBSNewsHour
Duration: 08:07

Relatives of fighters who joined the Islamic State militants and other groups came together at an anti-radicalization conference in Paris with hopes of reaching a turning point in the fight against extremism. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant reports.

Younger, More Diverse Voters Reject Presidential Candidates

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From: VOAvideo
Duration: 02:31

Many Americans are having trouble getting behind a candidate in this year's presidential election campaign, especially younger voters. VOA’s Katherine Gypson visits a college campus in northern Virginia to learn why younger and more racially diverse potential voters tend to stay away from the ballot box in general elections.
Originally published at - http://www.voanews.com/media/video/younger-more-diverse-voters-reject-presidential-candidates/3314528.html
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Ted Cruz Exits Republican Race for President 

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From: AssociatedPress
Duration: 01:36

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz ends presidential campaign, clearing Donald Trump's path to Republican nomination. (May 3)
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Sanders Goes After Clinton, Trump After Primary

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From: AssociatedPress
Duration: 01:57

Bernie Sanders is steering clear of Indiana's primary, opening his rally in Kentucky on Tuesday night by pointing to his progress in the Democratic presidential campaign. (May 3)
Subscribe for more Breaking News: http://smarturl.it/AssociatedPress
Get updates and more Breaking News here: http://smarturl.it/APBreakingNews
The Associated Press is the essential global news network, delivering fast, unbiased news from every corner of the world to all media platforms and formats.
AP’s commitment to independent, comprehensive journalism has deep roots. Founded in 1846, AP has covered all the major news events of the past 165 years, providing high-quality, informed reporting of everything from wars and elections to championship games and royal weddings. AP is the largest and most trusted source of independent news and information.
Today, AP employs the latest technology to collect and distribute content - we have daily uploads covering the latest and breaking news in the world of politics, sport and entertainment. Join us in a conversation about world events, the newsgathering process or whatever aspect of the news universe you find interesting or important. Subscribe: http://smarturl.it/AssociatedPress

Everything You Need to Know About Puerto Rico's Debt Crisis

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From: Bloomberg
Duration: 01:59

May 2 -- In today’s “QuickTake” Bloomberg's David Gura takes a look at Puerto Rico's debt load as it defaults on a $422 million bond payment. He speaks on "Bloomberg Markets."

FBI: Man put mouse poison on food in Ann Arbor stores - The Detroit News

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The Detroit News

FBI: Man put mouse poison on food in Ann Arbor stores
The Detroit News
David Gelios, special agent in charge of the FBI's Detroit Division, said the man admitted to contaminating food with a potentially hazardous liquid at the Whole Foods Market on West Eisenhower Parkway, a Meijer store on Ann Arbor-Saline Road and Plum ...
FBI nab man who sprayed mice poison on grocery food in Ann ArborDetroit Free Press
FBI hunts for suspect seen at Whole Foods pouring unknown liquid on foodFox News
FBI following 'viable leads' to ID man who sprinkled liquids at Whole FoodsMLive.com
Fortune -WFLA -Fox17
all 56 news articles »

CORRECTS: Arizona governor says Navy Seal killed in Iraq is Charlie Keating IV, grandson of financi

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PHOENIX (AP) - CORRECTS: Arizona governor says Navy Seal killed in Iraq is Charlie Keating IV, grandson of financier involved in savings and loan scandal. (Corrects APNewsAlert to add attribution )

Charlie Keating IV, grandson of Charles Keating, is Navy SEAL killed in Iraq 

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The Navy Seal killed in Iraq has been identified as Charlie Keating IV, the grandson of an Arizona financier who became the central figure in the 1980s savings and loan scandal.
The younger Mr. Keating was advising Kurdish forces fighting Islamic State terrorists in Iraq. He is the third U.S. ...
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U.S. weighs more troops, hi-tech weapons in Europe to counter Russia

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Seeking to stare down any future Russian aggression, the United States is looking to deploy more troops and sophisticated weapons to Europe, the U.S. military's top officer told Foreign Policy.
     

Navy SEAL killed in Iraq was star high school track athlete

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The Navy SEAL killed in Iraq on Tuesday was identified as Charlie Keating IV, a former Phoenix high school star distance runner.
     

Lew: Puerto Rico in Stress, Need for Action Urgent 

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From: Bloomberg
Duration: 13:39

May 3 -- U.S. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew discusses Puerto Rico's debt crisis and corporate inversion deals with Bloomberg's Erik Schatzker at the Milken Institute Global Conference.

Lula had 'key role' in Brazil scandal

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Brazil's Attorney General Rodrigo Janot asks the Supreme Court to authorise a corruption investigation against former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva.

US combat death in Iraq reflects intensifying war

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The combat death of a U.S Navy SEAL who was advising Kurdish forces in Iraq coincides with a gradually deepening American role in fighting a resilient Islamic State, even as the Iraqis struggle to muster the military and political strength to defeat the militants.





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Ted Cruz Calls Time On 2016 White House Bid

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Republican presidential hopeful Ted Cruz has suspended his White House campaign after being soundly defeated in Indiana.
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Ted Cruz pulls out of Republican race

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Ted Cruz announces he is ending campaign for US Republican presidential nomination, after losing heavily to Donald Trump in Indiana primary.

US Navy SEAL a victim of failed US strategy against ISIS?

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From: FoxNewsChannel
Duration: 09:26

Servicemember killed during intense Iraq firefight

Donald Trump links Ted Cruz's father to Lee Harvey Oswald

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From: FoxNewsChannel
Duration: 03:04

Republican presidential frontrunner brings tabloid conspiracy theory into the GOP race

Krauthammer: 'Stop Trump' movement dies in Indiana

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From: FoxNewsChannel
Duration: 04:27

Insight from the syndicated columnist and Fox News contributor

Donald Trump wins Indiana primary 

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From: FoxNewsChannel
Duration: 06:07

Too early to call Democratic race between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders

Nine Individuals, Including Five Registered Brokers, Indicted for Orchestrating a $131 Million Market Manipulation Scheme 

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— New York
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Russia’s Defense Industry Creaks Under High-Tech Military Demands

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Despite Russia’s defense budget sequestration, ranging from 5 to 10 percent depending on the source, the political-military leadership continues to put a brave face on meeting the expectations generated by its fantastically ambitious rearmament plans to 2020. The Kremlin, no doubt buoyed by the performance of the Russian Armed Forces in seizing Crimea and during ongoing military operations in Syria, has much to boast about concerning progress toward a high-tech, compact and modern military. However, many of these advances are being pursued at breakneck speed without really addressing long-term underlying issues that are sure to create internal tensions and that could, ultimately, trigger some type of defense industry crisis in the future. In this sense, though there are remarkable advances occurring within the Russian military and its modernization, visible in its operations and exercises and carefully shown on Red Square during the annual Victory Parade, there is pretty much no prospect that papering over the cracks in the unreformed defense industry will yield success. The driver behind the longer term crisis looming in the defense industry stems from the very success currently achieved toward a high-tech conventional force with robust Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance capabilities (C4ISR). In turn, this will only exponentially increase the insatiable demand on domestic enterprise to research, design and innovate in order to satisfy technology-centric appetites (seeEDM, April 19).
Deputy Defense Minister Tatyana Shevtsova, a survivor of the Anatoly Serdyukov era (defense minister in 2007–2012), is convinced that the “5 percent” sequestration will not negatively impact on the Armed Forces or its modernization plans. She describes using “reserve funds,” by implementing the “effective army” program, which allows some skimming off from funds originally intended for the maintenance of the Armed Forces. Such optimization plans to counter the current storm in state finances appear calculated to mitigate any tangible impact on military modernization. Yet, Shevtsova admits that spending costs have risen due to unforeseen events, such as Crimea and forming the Crimean group of forces, the intervention in Syria, or the flooding in the Russian Far East. Shevtsova says this compelled the maneuvering of costs and developing a flexible financial policy. If the level of cuts to defense spending increases, Shevtsova is confident this will not prove to be burdensome (Nezavisimoye Voyennoye Obozreniye, April 22).
Putin notes the pressures on the defense industry to cope with these issues, while praising their ability to deliver modern or innovative weapons and hardware to the Armed Forces. In 2015, for example, despite some delays, most orders were delivered in full and on time, resulting in the Armed Forces receiving around “4,000 major advanced models of arms and military equipment.” These deliveries included 96 aircraft, 81 helicopters, 2 multi-purpose submarines, 152 anti-aircraft missile complexes, 291 radars, and more than 400 pieces of artillery and armored vehicles (Interfax, March 11).
In late April, the deputy general director of Uralvagonzavod, Aleksey Zharich, reported that around 20 T-14 Armata tanks had passed military tests, and he said that “serial deliveries” could begin soon. The promise of the long-awaited latest air defense system—the S-500—is also characterized as imminent, but with no specific target date announced. Meanwhile, senior commanders are full of praise for advances in modernizing Russia’s electronic warfare (EW) assets. The chief of the Electronic Warfare Forces, Major-General Yury Lastochkin, claims that re-equipping the Armed Forces with the latest EW complexes has reached 46 percent of the total force structure (Nezavisimoye Voyennoye Obozreniye, April 17).
In an article in Nezavisimoye Voyennoye Obozreniye, Boris Voronkov, a specialist in military engineering, argued that the highly technical field of hydro acoustics is falling victim to a bureaucratic vicious circle: in his view, the Navy is creating a situation that will most likely further complicate its future development. According to Voronkov, as the Navy struggles with adopting a clear method of enhancing existing detection capabilities, which extend to 16 kilometers at present, the defense industry scientific structures and the defense ministry are in disagreement over how to resolve fundamental differences. Until these issues are finally resolved, the author suggests that progress will be inhibited, thus stalling advances in such a critical area (Nezavisimoye Voyennoye Obozreniye, April 15).
Major-General (retired) Igor Semenchenko, a former leading advisor to the Federation Council Committee on Defense and Security (2003–2013), on the other hand, sees continued systemic problems plaguing the defense industry, resulting from an acute shortage of qualified personnel. These shortages have long been known to Russian and foreign experts, who have regularly raised these issues in commentaries on the condition of the domestic defense industry. But this topic has resurfaced due to Semenchenko’s dire assessment of the state educational pans to 2030, which he regards as having potentially damaging consequences for future defense industry staffing (Voyenno Promyshlennyy Kuryer, April 26).
Semenchenko observers that leaked information on pre-planning for the new ten-year state armament program to 2025 focuses upon non-contact warfare and C4ISR systems. In his view, such leaks serve to increase the demand for highly qualified personnel in the defense enterprises. But he also notes that the comparatively low levels of salaries and social protection for such employees fails to attract sufficient numbers of young skilled workers. Semenchenko says that the share of workers at their most productive (35 years old) does not exceed the threshold of 25 percent, meaning that its current levels fail to promote the transmission of knowledge to the next generation. In this context, planned reductions in the numbers of state high schools across the country and other education policy initiatives will only worsen these issues, Semenchenko asserts (Voyenno Promyshlennyy Kuryer, April 26). He recommends, like others, the creation of a ministry for the defense industry, a federal law on the “military-industrial complex” to determine state monopoly control, as well as various tax reforms and incentives.
While there may currently be scope for optimizing and adopting financial flexibility to protect defense spending from unexpected challenges, the dysfunctional nature of an unreformed defense industry is ignored by the state’s leadership at its peril. It is precisely due to the increasingly high-tech demands placed on the domestic defense industry that serve to exacerbate these issues. Despite these inherent institutional weaknesses, military modernization advances are certainly in evidence, but the system is likely to over-heat and, with it, destroy the elite’s hope that the defense sector can become a driving force within the wider economy.
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Russian Money for Belarus: Not for a Base but to Limit Minsk’s Turn Toward Europe

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Many observers have concluded that Moscow’s new $2 billion aid package to Belarus is part of a deal to allow Russia to establish a military airbase on the territory of its western neighbor. But it is increasingly clear that Belarus has no intention of allowing the organization of such a base. Moreover, Moscow is developing weapons systems that make such a base unnecessary. And finally, the Russian government is planning to begin manufacturing military goods inside the country that Moscow had long relied on Belarus to produce. Consequently, the Kremlin leadership is, apparently, now caught in a trap of its own making: it has to continue to fund Minsk lest Belarus turn completely toward Europe or descend into instability—but it can no longer count on Minsk to support Moscow’s military efforts.
Moscow has long sought President Alyaksandr Lukashenka’s approval for the opening of a Russian military base in Belarus, both to solidify Russian influence there and to meet Russia’s own military needs (see EDM, October 7, 2015). But the Belarusian leader has been increasingly clear that he will not give such approval. And now, analysts are saying that recent developments in Russian military technology have reduced the importance of such an airbase as far as Russian military planners are concerned. Indeed, on the Naviny.by portal, Aleksandr Alesin says bluntly that “Russia has obtained the means to secure the neutralization of military objects in Eastern Europe without the use of the territory of Belarus… [T]hus, Moscow today [no longer] has a real need to establish its airbase” there (Naviny.by, April 30).
Alesin points to Russia’s latest training exercise in the Caspian Sea, where it is expanding its program of cruise missiles like the ones it used in Syria last year. The impact of such weapons in the Middle East has been much commented upon, but it is important to see, the Belarusian commentator says, that they also influence “the strategic situation in Eastern Europe”—something “military analysts of all the countries of the region are being forced to take into consideration.” Among the most important of these consequences in the short term, he suggests, is that Russia no longer has the same need to open a military airbase in Belarus. “One can say,” Alesin continues, “that the Belarusian leadership,” which has long opposed the base, has thus turned out to be “lucky.”
As recently as November 2015, Russian officials were treating the opening of a base in Belarus as a done deal, even though Minsk had yet to approve it. And commentators both in Moscow and in Central and Eastern Europe argued that Moscow needed the base to “neutralize” North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) forces in Poland and elsewhere in the region. That may have been true earlier, but the new Russian cruise missiles, which can fly far further than earlier generations of them, reduce the importance of such a base now.
Indeed, Alesin says, it has already become commonplace among Russian analysts to claim that the base issue for Moscow had less to do with military needs than as “a test” of Lukashenka’s loyalty to the Russian government and Vladimir Putin personally. Because such “tests” are important to Moscow, many assumed that the February 26 announcement that the Russian government was extending a $2 billion credit to Minsk was intended to be “a loan in exchange for the base.” Yet, the Belarusian reaction has been clear: Minsk needs the money—the Belarusian government is in extreme difficulty (see EDM, April 27)—and will take it but has no plans to open a base.
This is only one indication that in military affairs as in others, Lukashenka is exploiting the difficulties of Moscow’s position. Russia has little choice but to continue to provide what money it can to Minsk even though it can no longer be sure that Moscow will always obtain what it wants. And some Russian analysts are now saying that it is time for their country to take steps in order to be able to end its reliance on Belarus for weapons systems and other military goods.
At present, Regnum military observer Leonid Nersisyan writes this week, “the military-industrial complex of the Russian Federation is seriously dependent” on Belarusian firms for parts and even entire complexes; ending that dependence “will take years.” But he says that Moscow has no choice but to begin planning for a time when it will not be able to count on Belarus as a reliable supplier of such goods. Indeed, Nersisyan argues, this is where “import substitution,” which Putin has often advocated, is critically important (Regnum, May 2).
“No key elements of Russian military technology should be produced abroad, however close the relations between the countries involved are,” he argues, because those relations can always sour. Ukraine is an object lesson in that regard, but Belarus is threatening to become another one. Moscow needs to make plans now well before that happens or it will find its defense options limited by others, exactly the opposite outcome that the Russian government and the Russian people want (Regnum, May 2).
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Is Iraq's most important battle in Baghdad?

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The most consequential fight for the country's future may be playing out in Baghdad's Green Zone, not with bullets and bombs, but amid an unanswered cry for political reform to a deeply dysfunctional and sectarian state.
     

US troops getting closer to the fight against Islamic State in Iraq

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At the base of a rocky ridge rising from the surrounding farmland, the barrels of American artillery poke out from under camouflage covers, their sights trained on Islamic State-held positions.
     

Local Reporters Treat Obama Interview Like Tourists Rather Than Journalists 

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Two local news reporters who interviewed President Obama on Monday about the White House campaign to get Merrick Garland on the Supreme Court seemed to treat the occasion like wide-eyed tourists rather than journalists.
America Rising Squared flagged several clips and tweets of reporters Cammy Dierking of Local 12-Cincinnati and Kari Lake of Fox 10-Phoenix gushing about their excitement over talking to Obama, giving him a card and confessing heart palpitations.
“Another highlight of my day was the chance to see the first dogs, Sunny and Bo,” Dierking said during her report. “I even got a picture with them. They are Portuguese water dogs, they’re hypo-allergenic and they are super cute. That was pretty cool … all in all, it’s been an amazing day at the White House.”
She later tweeted it was the “Best. Day. Ever.”
Lake’s fellow Phoenix anchor touted how she was “picked” to talk with Obama one-on-one and “what a day” she must have had.
“Oh man, I can’t believe this day,” Lake said. “Really, since we got into D.C., it’s been a whirlwind.”
Later, she told her fellow anchor that preparing to talk to Obama was “unnerving,” who agreed that it’s “intense” to speak to the president.
“I have to tell you that for the first two minutes, my heart was ready to pound and beat out of my chest, but I finally calmed down a bit and got through the interview,” Lake said. “It is frustrating, though, to only have four minutes with the president. He’s very much trying to control the message. Thankfully, we were able to ask him a couple of other questions, but as you know, the president can be long-winded and he stays on message. He’s very good at doing that, so it’s hard to get him flustered or move him off whatever the message is he’s trying to put out.”
Lake gave Obama a card her daughter made for him while they set up microphones for their interview, “which led to some advice on parenting.”
One of Fox 10’s producers tweeted his thanks on Tuesday to the White House for a “great” event.
Not every reporter there was as impressed. The Washington Examiner noted WMUR-ABC reporter Josh McElveen wrote a first-person account of behind-the-scenes interactions with White House staff. He said he was not there because of his “sparkling personality,” noting all six local anchors who were invited came from states with Senate Republicans facing re-election in 2016.
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E.U. Will Hit Nations Rejecting Refugees With $300,000 Per Head Fine 

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European nations that turn away refugees could be forced to pay roughly $300,000 in fines for each individual rejected, European Union officials are expected to announce Wednesday.
The plan is part of the European Commission’s plan to overhaul its current asylum rules that neared collapse last year after more than a million refugees and migrants flooded across E.U. borders, theFinancial Times reported Tuesday.
The reshuffle is aimed at alleviating the strain on frontline nations, including Greece and Italy, that have grappled to absorb the heavy incursion of migrants.
Officials who saw the proposal in advance said the fine would act as a sanction on nations that refuse to adhere to the E.U.’s asylum system. While the exact penalty is still in flux, a diplomat said that it would amount to “hundreds of thousands of euros.”
The United Kingdom has the option to opt out of the new program.
The Guardian reported:
Under the latest plans, E.U. countries would still be responsible for housing refugees that arrive on their territory, preserving a key principle of existing asylum rules known as the Dublin regulation. Unlike under Dublin, refugees could be dispersed around the EU via a “corrective fairness mechanism” in the event that countries that are the first arrival point are unable to cope.
The penalties are intended to incentivize nations to abide by the currently failed migrant quotas.
Eastern European nations, including Poland and Hungary, would likely accept the new changes, but the recommended fines would be a hard-hit to their economies, according to the Financial Times.


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Battlefield tech gets spotlight in Maryland courts: Secrecy and defense concerns surround cellphone trackers - Frederick News Post (subscription)

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Battlefield tech gets spotlight in Maryland courts: Secrecy and defense concerns surround cellphone trackers
Frederick News Post (subscription)
As Meckler shifted through case files, she discovered something she'd never noticed in her 25 years on the job — an after-action police report from the city police's Advanced Tactical Team. Though she'd seen after action reports ... Citing unusual ...

FBI Warns That Ransomware Is on the Rise - Breitbart News

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Breitbart News

FBI Warns That Ransomware Is on the Rise
Breitbart News
The FBI has issued a warning that ransomware attacks are on the rise, along with some tips for how to deal with the threat. Ransomware is a form of hacker mischief in which a virus, usually delivered by email, locks down a computer system until the ...
FBI Reaffirms Stance Not to Pay Ransomware AttackersThreatpost
FBI Issues New Ransomware Warning as Utility is HitInfosecurity Magazine

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Navy reinstates nurse who refused to force-feed at Guantanamo

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A Navy lieutenant nurse who refused to force-feed protesting prisoners at Guantanamo in the summer of 2014 has been restored to full duty.
     

Army private kills former Marine in parking lot shooting

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A young soldier shot and wounded his wife outside a Dallas-area store and then gunned down a father of three who tried to make a citizen's arrest.
     

Journalists in South Sudan Call Their Work Difficult, Dangerous

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South Sudanese journalists said Tuesday that their work is not only challenging, but that their lives can be put in danger when they seek out the truth. Reporters have little to no access to information from government departments, they said, and scores of journalists have been harassed and even detained for weeks by people believed to be government security operatives. The reporters spoke at an event in Juba marking World Press Freedom Day — in a country that ranked 140th out of 180 countries on the 2016 World Press Freedom Index, as compiled Reporters Without Borders. At the event, journalists and citizens gathered to recognize the critical role reporters play in South Sudan, and to shine a spotlight on the mistreatment of journalists. Silent treatment Philip Wani, a reporter with the United Nations’ Radio Miraya in South Sudan, said he'd often gone into the field to gather or verify information and found that officials would refuse to talk to him. “An official will not be transparent to you," Wani said. "He will require you to come with a written letter you have to take to his boss — you know, a lot of bureaucratic procedures.” Wani said that just last week, when First Vice President Riek Machar arrived in Juba to take his role in the national unity government, security operatives blocked some journalists from getting to the airport and the presidential palace, making it difficult to cover the story of Machar’s long-awaited arrival and subsequent swearing-in. Josephine Achiro, director of the Catholic Church-owned Radio Bhakita, said that kind of behavior is not unusual in South Sudan. “We face a lot of insecurity," she said. "The issue of mobility is also one of the things. In most cases, this is one of the major problems we have. We cannot access going outside Juba because of mobility, transportation and insecurity.” Achiro said some South Sudanese journalists have been physically attacked, while others have received threatening messages on their phones. 7 journalists killed The Union of Journalists of South Sudan and the Association for Media Development in South Sudan are among the groups that organized Tuesday’s event under the theme “Access to Information and Fundamental Freedoms: This is Your Right.” Union of Journalists Chairman Oliver Modi said government security agents continue to harass, detain and arrest journalists. In the past year, seven journalists were killed in South Sudan, and not one suspect has been questioned in connection with any of the killings, he said. “The challenges that are facing the media industry in South Sudan, and particularly the journalists, is the recognition of the rights of journalists to work in a free and fair environment," he said. "In the last two years, journalists have been harassed and arrested, and the arrests are not being carried out in a legal procedure. There has been some sort of intimidation.” Modi said government officials must abide by South Sudan’s media laws when interacting with journalists. Prodding from U.N. Eugene Owusu, deputy representative of the U.N. secretary-general in South Sudan, called on the government to improve its relationship with the media. “As this country moves forward to bury its past and chart a new future, press freedom and access to information will be central to the quality of transitional justice, reconciliation and the wider democratic reform agenda that we seek to achieve,” he said. Owusu called on the government to use the recently enacted media laws to improve the working environment for journalists across the country, and demonstrate its willingness to support the media. He also reminded journalists about the importance of reporting accurately on the news.

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Russia delays UN council condemnation of North Korea missile tests - Reuters

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Reuters

Russia delays UN council condemnation of North Korea missile tests
Reuters
"The Security Council needs to respond swiftly; so we don't understand why Russia is blocking while all other council members, including China, which borders DPRK (North Korea), can agree," Britain's Deputy U.N. Ambassador Peter Wilson said. Russian ...

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MSF Blasts US, Russia, Syria, and Saudi for Hospital … - Foreign Policy (blog)

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Foreign Policy (blog)

MSF Blasts US, Russia, Syria, and Saudi for Hospital …
Foreign Policy (blog)
In a stinging rebuke, the president of French medical relief agency Medecins Sans Frontieres on Tuesday accused several governments, including the United States, Russia, Saudi Arabia, and Syria, of either directly attacking medical workers or ...

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Autonomous Cars May Lead to New Sex Habits

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New technologies are meant to make our lives easier, but they can often bring unintended consequences, such as identity theft and the loss of our private data. And then there's this: Automotive expert Barrie Kirk, from the Canadian Automated Vehicle Centre of Excellence, said the use of autonomous cars may result in more sex while driving. Kirk said that when cars become so smart that even the passive attention of the driver will not be required, at least during long stretches of highway driving, more people may feel the urge to lose themselves in a passionate way. Of course, this is only a part of a bigger concern that people will overestimate the abilities of computers driving the car and engage in all kinds of distracting behavior. Manufacturers of autonomous cars often emphasize that fully automated cars are still a long way off. Until that time ... drive safely.

Alienated, Unhappy With Choices, Many Young US Adults Shun Voting 

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It’s a Wednesday afternoon American government class in the diverse Washington suburb of Alexandria, Virginia. A group of students is arguing passionately and thoughtfully about gun control. They represent a range of ethnicities and races, but they are all young. They’re attending an affordable college to earn a degree so they can get good jobs — but they have no interest in voting. Presidential front-runners Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton’s historic negative ratings among American voters will probably do little to change their minds and an unfortunate reality from the last presidential election: Only about half of all Americans eligible to vote actually go to the voting booth. According to Pew Research surveys of the 2014 and 2012 general elections, nonvoters overwhelmingly tend to be from groups that could be most impacted by government policies, like these students. “Nonvoters tend to be younger, more financially strapped, more likely to be minorities. People who are likely voters tend to be older, whiter, more financially secure,” says Carroll Doherty, director of political research at the Pew Research Center. Unhappy with choices The students say the choice not to vote is brought on by a lack of choice. “I joke around all the time in class and say, ‘I wish we could just reroll the dice and get some new candidates because these guys are just crazy,' ” says Cody Berges, 24, who served in the military and now wants to study history. Berges is attracted to Trump’s proposal to prevent illegal immigration with a border wall but says the candidate “just seems overly extreme on the conservative side, and Bernie Sanders seems like a socialist in most people’s eyes, and Hillary seems like she would be too liberal for the moderates in the middle.” He voted for Marco Rubio in the Virginia primary election, but Berges says Election Day in November will be difficult. “I want to go vote," he says, "but if I can’t support someone wholeheartedly, then I can’t go.” Put off by past, passion According to Doherty, more than a third of nonvoters are under 30. The frustration echoed by Derges’ classmates helps reveal why that may be. “We are uninformed, but it’s not because we don’t care,” says sophomore Rob Carter, 20. “I think it’s because the landscape of politics that Hillary represents, and that’s been represented since we were kids, has been alienating us.” Like many nonvoters, Carter describes himself as leaning liberal on political and social issues. He says he can’t see himself ever voting until there is a change in politicians’ tone. “I don’t like the extremist atmosphere that is politics nowadays — sort of the shouting, who is more extreme, who is more passionate,” he says. Carter sees Trump’s blunt, unfiltered style as a possible way out. “He’s like a TV show character but so calculated and good," he says. "I respect that, and I hope that’s what politics are in the future — not acting as much.” Relatable candidates “Secretary Clinton was my role model back in middle school,” says junior Lauren Reyes, 21. She says she thought Clinton was “the greatest thing on the planet,” but she won’t vote for her in the first presidential election she’s eligible to vote in. “The way that she’s trying to acquire votes from people of color and from minorities is incredibly embarrassing on her part,” Reyes says of how Clinton lost her vote. “I know she’s trying to relate to what people are doing, but it’s hard to relate when you haven’t had to go through what they go through.” Many of the students described the remaining presidential candidates as “characters” or “reality show candidates.” They said they wanted a candidate who could relate to their personal experiences. Relatability is particularly important when considering the demographic makeup of a nonvoter. Doherty says there is “a very strong racial gap” between white voters and minority nonvoters, and the differences in financial background are even more striking. “Only about half of nonvoters told us they had a credit card,” he said. “They’re less likely to attend college and have lower incomes.”   Morality of voting “I’m just really confused,” says Reyes, whose mother emigrated from El Salvador. “Should I vote? Should I not vote? It’s morally confusing.” She cares deeply about reproductive rights and immigration but sees no alternatives beyond Clinton. Reyes will count among the millions of so-called disengaged voters this election, but she is engaged enough to note that local and state elections often mean more for daily life. An April 2016 Rasmussen poll found that 6 percent of Americans said they would stay home if the choice was between Trump and Clinton. That decision is particularly difficult for freshman Carolina Escalante, 18. The daughter of two Salvadorian immigrants who fled to the United States says she will not vote in her first election because she already understands the impact her choice can have. “I don’t want to make a decision, then maybe one of these candidates will do something,” she says. “I shouldn’t be like, ‘Oh, I voted for him,’ and feel guilty about it.”

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UNESCO Lauds Ismayilova Amid Mounting Pressure For Journalist's Freedom

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WASHINGTON -- On World Press Freedom Day, imprisoned Azerbaijani investigative reporter and RFE/RL contributor Khadija Ismayilova was named the 2016 recipient of the UNESCO/Guillermo Cano World Press Freedom Prize, as journalists and activists around the world invoked the day’s message to call for her release. The journalist’s mother, Elmira Ismayilova, traveled from Baku to accept the award at a ceremony in Helsinki, Finland on May 3, reciting a defiant speech written by her daughter...

Trump Says Russian Planes Should Be Shot Down ‘At Certain Point’ - The Moscow Times | Navy boss: Russian jets should stop buzzing US planes, ship - US News | Cessation of hostilities in Aleppo to be announced in coming hours - Lavrov — RT News | U.S., NATO Look to Combat an Aggressive Russia - US News | Defense Sec’y Carter says Russia is ‘nuclear saber-rattling’ - The Washington Post

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Syria conflict: Russia hopes to extend truce to Aleppo - BBC News | Russia Sees Aleppo Truce Within Hours as UN Looks to Renew Talks - Bloomberg | U.S., Russia to Open Center in Geneva to Monitor Syria Truce | News | The Moscow Times

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Министр иностранных дел России Сергей Лавров (слева) и специальный посланник ООН по Сирии Стаффан де Мистура
Ъ - От сирийских переговоров ждут многого

Map of Aleppo
Syria conflict: Russia hopes to extend truce to Aleppo - BBC News


Many killed in Aleppo as fierce fighting shatters Syria’s fragile truce | World news | The Guardian


Opposition-held area of city at risk of siege as violence erupts days after halt in peace talks and deployment of Russian artillery
Forces loyal to Bashar al-Assad are buoyed by recent battlefield advances, largely the result of massive Russian aerial bombardment of rebels fighting to overthrow the Syrian dictator. But progress in recent weeks has been slow with the partial withdrawal of Russian forces ordered by the Kremlin.
Government forces hope to encircle east Aleppo, which is held by the opposition, and are also fighting in the countryside to cut supply lines in the north from Turkey.


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Spain Issues Warrants For Top Russian Officials, Putin Insiders | Portuguese Police Raid Soccer Clubs In Probe Possibly Linked To Russian Crime 

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Spain Issues Warrants For Top Russian Officials, Putin Insiders

A Spanish judge has issued international arrest warrants for several Russian political figures and former government officials closely linked to President Vladimir Putin.





Putinfellas

In 2010, [Spanish Judge] Grinda briefed U.S. officials in Madrid about the investigation, informing them that the Kremlin used “organised crime groups to do whatever the government of Russia cannot acceptably do as a government.”According to a classified cable from the U.S. embassy that was published by Wikileaks, the prosecutor told the American officials that Putin’s Russia was a “virtual mafia” state where it was impossible to distinguish between the government’s activities and those of organized crime groups.In terms of countering the threat Putin’s Russia poses to the West, the Spanish investigation is no less important than NATO’s moves to rotate four brigades through the alliance’s frontline states in Eastern Europe.The alliance’s decision to beef up defenses on its eastern flank should create a credible deterrent to the kinetic threat from Moscow.But dealing with the more insidious non-kinetic threat, the one stemming from Moscow’s weaponization of organized crime, is a job for law-enforcement.
Source: Putinfellas












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M.N.: The very strange and puzzling case against V. Bukovsky...

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M.N.: The very strange and puzzling case against V. Bukovsky. I believe that it is entirely possible that the "forbidden pedophilic images" were somehow planted into his computer by Russian intelligence services or their equivalents. Given all this hullabaloo with cybersecurity these days and the "achievements" of  Russian hackers, it would not be surprising at all. It would also fit neatly into the evident, counteracting "anti-Putin pedophilia narrative", apparently pursued actively by "his post-Soviet majesty's" servants. The most poignant thing is that this affair pits such a figure as V. Bukovsky against the British judicial system, which he called "Kafkaesque". I guess, some people in some Moscow offices rub their hands with glee and satisfaction. This "case", I am sure, is watched by many and it might produce some investigative, legal, cyber and political lessons to learn. 

Russian dissident, who was a close friend of Litvinenko, is protesting at ‘Kafkaesque’ judicial system in UK. Source:Vladimir Bukovsky: ‘I’m on hunger strike for the British public’ | World news | The Guardian


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How they found it

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Researchers believe they have found the wreckage of the HMS Endeavour near Rhode Island, U.S.

Living the good life in Greece 

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From: CNN
Duration: 01:11

On "Parts Unknown," Anthony Bourdain journeys to the Greek island of Naxos, where he gets more than a taste of the Greek good life. Sunday at 9 p.m.

Bangladeshi Blogger Turns to U.S. For Help 

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From: AssociatedPress
Duration: 02:33

Facing death threats and worried over a growing number of extremist attacks in Bangladesh, one activist is seeking the U.S.' help. Ashif Entaz Rabi hopes the U.S. will "open a small door" to him and others so they can escape the wave of violence. (May 3)
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Kerry: Committing Journalism 'Not A Crime' 

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From: AssociatedPress
Duration: 02:38

On World Press Freedom Day, US Secretary of State John Kerry says that journalism and reporting the truth is a badge of honor. (May 3)
Subscribe for more Breaking News: http://smarturl.it/AssociatedPress
Get updates and more Breaking News here: http://smarturl.it/APBreakingNews
The Associated Press is the essential global news network, delivering fast, unbiased news from every corner of the world to all media platforms and formats.
AP’s commitment to independent, comprehensive journalism has deep roots. Founded in 1846, AP has covered all the major news events of the past 165 years, providing high-quality, informed reporting of everything from wars and elections to championship games and royal weddings. AP is the largest and most trusted source of independent news and information.
Today, AP employs the latest technology to collect and distribute content - we have daily uploads covering the latest and breaking news in the world of politics, sport and entertainment. Join us in a conversation about world events, the newsgathering process or whatever aspect of the news universe you find interesting or important. Subscribe: http://smarturl.it/AssociatedPress
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Egypt among the worst in press freedom: report

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From: AlJazeeraEnglish
Duration: 01:55

North Africa and the Middle East is the region where journalists are most restricted, according to the Reporters Without Borders’ World Press Freedom Index.
The report found that journalists are stifled by leaders trying to maintain stability in Egypt.
Under an anti-terrorism law adopted in Egypt in August 2015, journalists are forced on national security grounds to report only the official version of so-called "terror" attacks.
The most recent incident was three days ago, when two journalists were arrested over their reporting on the Egyptian president.
Al Jazeera’s Mereana Hond reports.
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NYPD Officer Andre Clarke Pleads Guilty to Conspiracy to Distribute Oxycodone in Vermont 

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— Albany

Kerry Confident On Syrian Truce, Warns Assad

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U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry has voiced optimism a cease-fire deal can still be restored in Syria despite escalating violence there.

As US Rotates Generals in Europe, Job Is Prevent New 'Cold War' 

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As he stepped down as America's top commander in Europe on Tuesday, retiring Air Force General Philip Breedlove recalled how he began his career more than three decades ago trying to keep the peace during the Cold War with the Soviet Union. "I think my career is now ending here, trying to prevent a Cold War - and continue to keep the peace," Breedlove said in a farewell address, shortly before he received a final salute from troops at European Command headquarters in Germany. "But I hand that mission over now to you." Breedlove turned over European Command to Army General Curtis Scaparrotti, ending an era during which the straight-talking general helped transform U.S. and NATO planning in Europe after Russia's annexation of Crimea in 2014. A similar ceremony will take place on Wednesday to pass along Breedlove's other title, NATO supreme allied commander Europe. Backed by a big increase in U.S. military spending, NATO is setting up small eastern outposts, forces on rotation, regular war games and warehoused equipment ready for a rapid response force, all to deter Russia. U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter acknowledged on Tuesday NATO discussions to strengthen the alliance's position on its eastern flank, possibly by sending four battalions to rotate through the Baltic states and Poland. The moves effectively represent NATO's biggest build-up in eastern Europe since the Cold War. The Kremlin denies any intentions to attack the Baltic countries, but it has often said that they have become an aggressive "Russophobic kernel" pushing NATO toward a consistently anti-Russian posture. Tensions between Washington and Moscow have been highlighted by recent encounters between their militaries. Last month, two Russian warplanes flew what U.S. officials described as simulated attack passes near a U.S. guided missile destroyer in the Baltic Sea. Despite those incidents, the United States and Russia still work together diplomatically. Carter noted critical U.S. and Russian collaboration, including to secure a deal last year with Iran over its nuclear program. "That's why we'll keep the door open for Russia. But it's up to the Kremlin to decide," Carter said. "We do not seek a cold, let alone a hot war with Russia. But make no mistake, we will defend our allies, the rules-based international order, and the positive future it affords us."

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Magnitsky fraud cash laundered, MPs hear

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Fund manager seeks inquiry into inflow of alleged ‘Russian dirty money’

В США скончался гражданин РФ, находившийся под стражей - ИА REGNUM

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НТВ.ru

В США скончался гражданин РФ, находившийся под стражей
ИА REGNUM
Вашингтон, 3 Мая 2016, 23:13 — REGNUM 46-летний гражданин РФ Игорь Зязин, который был взят под стражу сотрудниками иммиграционной и таможенной службы США, скончался в Сан-Диего (штат Калифорния). Об этом сообщает НТВ. Новости партнеров. Немецкое СМИ ...
В США в изоляторе для мигрантов умер гражданин РоссииРБК
СМИ: россиянин скончался в камере иммиграционной полиции СШАНТВ.ru
Взятый под стражу россиянин умер в СШАВзгляд
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