Monday, October 3, 2016

"Dialogue and multiculturalism": Civil society must guarantee religious freedom, Pope says in Azerbaijan: "it is “the task of every civil society to support religion, which allows a light to shine through, indispensable for living.” - Catholic News Agency (CNA)

Image result for pope in baku




Apostolic Journey to Georgia and Azerbaijan - 9.30-10.2.16

Apostolic Journey to Georgia and Azerbaijan: Interreligious meeting with the Sheikh and with the Representatives of the different Religious Communities of the country at “Heydar Aliyev” Mosque (Baku, 2 October 2016) | Francis
pope baku speech transcript - Google Search
Civil society must guarantee religious freedom, Pope says in Azerbaijan :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)
Pope blasts gender theory as 'great...
Full text: Pope Francis' in-flight press conference from Azerbaijan :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)
Pope tops off Caucasus visit with stop in Azerbaijan | Fox News
Pope Francis in Azerbaijan - Visit with the Muslim Sheik and Interreligious Encounter - YouTube
Pope Francis in Azerbaijan - Visit with the Muslim Sheik and Interreligious Encounter - YouTube
Pope in Azerbaijan: ‘Caucuses region to be a doorway open to peace’ - YouTube
pope in baku mosque - YouTube
Visit of Pope Francis to the Heydar Aliyev Mosque, Baku, Azerbaijan 2 October 2016 HD - YouTube
Pope visits mosque in Azerbaijan - YouTube
Pope Francis visits Alley of Martyrs in Baku - AZERTAC - Azerbaijan State News Agency
Orthodox delegation stays away from pope’s Mass in Georgia | Toronto Star

10.3.16 - M

The Trump Possibility - The New York Times
Russia's Putin suspends plutonium cleanup accord with U.S. because of 'unfriendly' acts | Reuters
Trump's Putin infatuation undermines Western democracy | TheHill
Donald Trump, American Oligarch - The New Yorker
Five big questions from Trump’s tax-return revelations - The Washington Post
Who gave Trump’s taxes to the New York Times? The mystery behind a bombshell story. - The Washington Post
Donald Trump’s Shiny New Washington Hotel - The New York Times
Here's Why Donald Trump's New DC Hotel May Be a Financial Flop | Mother Jones
WikiLeaks - Google Search
‘We run the streets’: Video shows angry mob attacking CHP patrol car with officer still inside - The Washington Post
NYPD investigates cop who shot himself twice after FBI visit | New York Post
Nobel Prize in medicine awarded to Japan’s Yoshinori Ohsumi for work on ‘cell recycling’ - The Washington Post
Elections
Google News
Gingrich Scolds Trump: ‘You Can’t Tweet at 3:00 in the Morning. Period.’ | Mediaite
The Trump comedy: Putin to invest in America? - San Francisco Chronicle

Posts - 10.3.16

News Reviews and Opinions: Julian Assange canceled a much-anticipated announcement | WikiLeaks promises surprise Clinton revelations from Berlin | "How is this possible?" - The Trump Possibility - The New York Times | The Political and Geopolitical Games of Fear and Anger - Links | » Donald Trump’s New Hotel Was Hit With ‘Black Lives Matter’ Graffiti 02/10/16 18:46 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks

Russia Review - October 2016

Rory Stewart: global order out of control as Russia 'swaggers' | Politics | The Guardian
NATO Warns West Is Losing “Information War” Against Russia, Islamic State Group
Russia warns US not to attack Syrian regime - CNN.com
Russia warns U.S. of “tectonic consequences” in Syria - CBS News

The Political and Geopolitical Games of Fear and Anger - 9.26.16


The Political and Geopolitical Games of Fear and Anger - Google Search
9.2.16 - Donald Trump and the Politics of Fear - The Atlantic
3.15.16 - Anger and fear dominate U.S. politics - Chicago Tribune
12.10.15 - Trump's Popularity Reflects Fear, Anger and a Desire to Be Entertained - NYTimes.com
Why Donald Trump is Winning - The Globalist
Why Political Leaders Need To Focus On Voters' Fears And Anger Rather Than Policies
Do mass shootings increase trump election chances? - Google Search
Does Russia help Trump with mass shootings? - Google Search
mass shootings increase trump election chances - Google Search
mass shootings increased trump election chances - Google Search
The Geopolitics of Emotion: How Cultures of Fear, Humiliation, and Hope are Reshaping the World: Dominique Moisi: 9780307387370: Amazon.com: Books
Politics Daily
Lewandowski: Clinton has to become human - POLITICO
Why Trump Will Win the First Debate | Vanity Fair
It’s beyond debate that Donald Trump is unfit to be president - The Washington Post
Inside Trump adviser Manafort’s world of politics and global financial dealmaking - The Washington Post
russian interference in us elections - Google Search
russia interference in us elections - Google Search
russian interference in european elections - Google Search
russia interference in european elections - Google Search

Can Fancy Bear Be Stopped?


Newsweek Hacked After Donald Trump Cuba Story, As FBI Director Talks Hacking Investigation Into October Surprise
Criticize Donald Trump, get your site smashed offline from Russia • The Register
Can Fancy Bear Be Stopped? The Clear and Present Danger of Russian Info Ops
Spooked - The Atlantic
Fancy Bear - Google Search
Fancy Bear - Google Search

10.2.16 - Su

5 Counterterrorism Strategies for the Next President
Counter-Terrorism: Mossad Versus Quds In South America
Politics, Language and Power | Sri Lanka Guardian
Trump's D.C. hotel vandalized - POLITICO
Donald Trump's New Hotel Was Hit With...
As news of Trump’s taxes breaks, he goes off script at a rally in Pennsylvania - The Washington Post
The biggest crisis yet: Trump campaign reels after tax documents published | US news | The Guardian
Donald Trump Tax Records Show He Could Have Avoided Taxes for Nearly Two Decades, The Times Found - The New York Times
Syrian Army Presses into Aleppo after Hospital Bombings
Brexit: Theresa May prioritises immigration curbs over single market | Politics | The Guardian

Posts - 10.2.16

News Reviews and Opinions: Newsweek Hacked After Donald Trump Cuba Story, As FBI Director Talks Hacking Investigation Into October Surprise
News Reviews and Opinions: » Pope Encourages Religious Tolerance in Azerbaijan 02/10/16 11:24 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks
The U.S. and Global Security Review: Monitoring the Pulse of World Leaders
The U.S. and Global Security Review: Can Fancy Bear Be Stopped? | The Analysis of Donald Trump | Personal health issues of candidates - 2016 presidential election - Links
Can Fancy Bear Be Stopped? - Google Search

The Analysis of Donald Trump


Civil society must guarantee religious freedom, Pope says in Azerbaijan :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)

1 Share
Baku, Azerbaijan, Oct 2, 2016 / 08:21 am (CNA/EWTN News).- In his final speech in Azerbaijan, Pope Francis spoke at length praising the good interreligious relations in the country, but also cautioned that religion must always be respected in civil society, and can never be used as a tool to justify violence.
“Society must always overcome the temptation to take advantage of religious factors,” the Pope said Oct. 2. Religions, he said, “must never be instrumentalized, nor can they ever lend support to, or approve of, conflicts and disagreements.”
To illustrate his point, the Pope referred to the traditional artistic windows of Azerbaijan made solely out of wood and tinted glass, with no glue or nails used in the process.
With the traditional means of crafting, the wood and the glass are set together through “time-consuming and meticulous effort,” leading the wood to support the glass, which in turn lets the light in, he observed.
Using this method as a metaphor, he said it is “the task of every civil society to support religion, which allows a light to shine through, indispensable for living.”
In order for this to happen, “an effective and authentic freedom must be guaranteed,” and artificial forms of “glue” that “bind people to believe, imposing on them a determined belief system and depriving them of the freedom to choose,” cannot be used.
The Pope also condemned the use of “external nails” such as worldliness and the yearning for power and money. God, he said, “cannot be used for personal interests and selfish ends; he cannot be used to justify any form of fundamentalism, imperialism or colonialism.”
He then made a heartfelt appeal for “no more violence in the name of God! May his most holy Name be adored, not profaned or bartered as a commodity through forms of hatred and human opposition.”
Pope Francis traveled to Azerbaijan as the last stop of his three-day trip there and to Georgia, both of which have a small minority of Catholics. Azerbaijan marks the first time the Pope has ever traveled to a majority Shi’ite nation.
The last encounter of the day was an ecumenical meeting that brought together Allahshükür Hummat Pashazade, who as Sheikh and Grand Mufti of the Caucasus is one of the most influential Muslim voices in the world, as well as the local religious leaders of the Russian Orthodox Church and those of the Jewish communities.
In his speech, Francis highlighted the good relations Catholics enjoy with Muslims in the area, pointing to “the tangible help” that the Islamic leader has offered to the Catholic community on several occasions.
He also pointed to the positive relationship between Catholics and Orthodox in the area, as well as the friendship they enjoy with the Jews.
There is a desire within Azerbaijan to protect the religious heritage of each and to pursue greater openness, he said, adding that “it is not opposition but cooperation that helps to build better and more peaceful societies.”
The fraternity sought by the various religions in the area directly opposes those who wish to focus on division or reawaken tensions that come from opposition and differences, he said.
Opening oneself to others “does not lead to impoverishment but rather enrichment, because it enables us to be more human,” he said, adding that it helps all parties to act “with neither abstract idealism nor with interventionism, not by harmful interference or forceful actions, but rather out of respect for the dynamics of history, cultures and religious traditions.”
Religions, he said, have the key task of accompanying people through life, helping them to understand that “the center of each person is outside of himself, that we are oriented toward the Most High and toward the other who is our neighbor.”
Part of this task involves providing authentic answers to those who often find themselves lost among “the swirling contradictions of our time.”
Among these contradictions is a seemingly dominant attitude of nihilism on the part of those who don't believe in anything “except their own well-being, advantage and profit,” he said.
On the other hand, there is a growing presence of “rigid and fundamentalist” attitudes from “those who, through violent words and deeds, seek to impose extreme and radical attitudes which are furthest from the living God.”
Contrary to these attitudes, religions are called to build and foster “a culture of encounter and peace,” based on mutual understanding and humility. True peace, achieved through prayer and dialogue, is a duty for both Christians and other religious communities, he said.
To be open and hope for the good of others is not a type of “accommodating facile syncretism, nor a diplomatic openness which says yes to everything in order to avoid problems,” the Pope said.
Rather, it is “a path of dialogue with others and a path of prayer for all,” allowing love to rise “where there is hatred, and forgiveness where there is offence, of never growing weary of imploring and tracing the ways of peace.”
“The blood of far too many people cries out to God from the earth,” he said, stressing that in the current global context, “we are challenged to give a response that can no longer be put off: to build together a future of peace.”
“Now is not the time for violent or abrupt solutions, but rather an urgent moment to engage in patient processes of reconciliation,” he said, praying that amid the ongoing “night of conflict” overshadowing the global community, religions would be a sign of peace amid “the devastation of death.”
The Pope prayed that religions, particularly in the Caucasus region, would be “active agents” in overcoming the tragedies and tensions of the past and present.
“The treasures old and ever new of the wisdom, culture and religious sensibility of the people of the Caucasus, are a tremendous resource for the future of the region and especially for European culture,” he said, and prayed that they would always be known and valued.
Read the whole story

· · · ·

Pope Francis most likely to visit India, Bangladesh in 2017 - Zee News

1 Share

NBCNews.com



Pope Francis most likely to visit India, Bangladesh in 2017
Zee News
Aboard the papal plane: Pope Francis will visit Portugal next year and is "almost sure" he'll go to India and Bangladesh. Still to be determined is where in Africa he'll visit and whether Colombia's peace accord is "certain, certain, certain" enough to ...
Full text: Pope Francis' in-flight press conference from AzerbaijanCatholic News Agency
Pope celebrates Mass in BakuAZERTAC News

all 146 news articles »

WikiLeaks Cancels Major Clinton Revelation Amid 'Security Concerns' - Daily Caller

1 Share

Heat Street



WikiLeaks Cancels Major Clinton Revelation Amid 'Security Concerns'
Daily Caller
WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange gestures during a news conference at the Ecuadorian embassy in central London, Britain, in this August 18, 2014 file photo. Swedish prosecutors said on Thursday they had dropped investigations into allegations of sexual ...
That big WikiLeaks release is coming — if you believe this tweetWSOC Charlotte

all 23 news articles »

Taliban fighters enter northern Afghan city of Kunduz - Reuters

1 Share

Reuters



Taliban fighters enter northern Afghan city of Kunduz
Reuters
Afghan security forces prepare themselves during a battle with insurgents on the outskirts of Kunduz, Afghanistan August 21, 2016. REUTERS/Nasir Wakif. By Sardar Razmal | KUNDUZ, Afghanistan. KUNDUZ, Afghanistan Taliban fighters mounted a ...
Taliban launches attack on Afghanistan's KunduzAljazeera.com
Afghanistan: IED blast in army vehicle kills 2 in Kabul; Taliban attacks Kunduz cityInternational Business Times, India Edition
Afghanistan: Taliban attacks Kunduz againBusiness Standard
Hindu Business Line
all 13 news articles »

New Trump International hotel in DC vandalized with Black Lives Matter sayings - USA TODAY

1 Share



New Trump International hotel in DC vandalized with Black Lives Matter sayings
USA TODAY
WASHINGTON (WUSA9) - The newly constructed Trump International Hotel in Northwest Washington, D.C., was vandalized Saturday afternoon with Black Lives Matter sayings, Metropolitan Police said. Police received a call around 4 p.m. Saturday for a ...

and more »

Apostolic Journey to Georgia and Azerbaijan: Interreligious meeting with the Sheikh and with the Representatives of the different Religious Communities of the country at “Heydar Aliyev” Mosque (Baku, 2 October 2016)

1 Share
INTERRELIGIOUS MEETING WITH THE SHEIKH AND WITH THE REPRESENTATIVES
OF THE DIFFERENT RELIGIOUS COMMUNITIES OF THE COUNTRY
ADDRESS OF THE HOLY FATHER
“Heydar Aliyev” Mosque - Baku
Sunday, 2 October 2016

Our being here together is a blessing. I thank the President of the Council of the Muslims in the Caucasus, who welcomes us with his customary hospitality, and the local religious Leaders of the Russian Orthodox Church, as well as the Leaders of the Jewish Communities. Meeting one another in fraternal friendship in this place of prayer is a powerful sign, one that shows the harmony which religions can build together, based on personal relations and on the good will of those responsible. This is seen, for example, in the tangible help that the President of the Council of the Muslims has guaranteed to the Catholic community here on more than one occasion, along with the wise counsel that, in a familial spirit, he shares with that community. I wish also to highlight the good relations that unite local Catholics to the Orthodox community in solid fraternity and daily affection which are an example for all, as well as the warm friendship shared with the Jewish community.
The benefits of this harmony are felt throughout Azerbaijan, a country that distinguishes itself for its welcome and hospitality, gifts which I have experienced on this memorable day, one for which I am truly grateful. There is here a desire to protect the great heritage of religions and, at the same time, a pursuit of deeper and more fruitful openness. The Catholic Church, for example, finds a place and lives in harmony among other religions that have far more members, demonstrating concretely that it is not opposition but cooperation that helps to build better and more peaceful societies. Our being together at this place is also in continuity with the many meetings that are held in Baku to promote dialogue and multiculturalism. Opening the doors of welcome and integration means opening the doors of each person’s heart and the doors of hope to everyone. I am confident that this country, “the gateway between East and West” (John Paul II, Address at the Welcome Ceremony, Baku, 22 May 2002), will always cultivate its vocation to openness and encounter, the indispensable conditions for building lasting bridges of peace and a future worthy of humanity.
The fraternity and sharing that we seek to increase will not be appreciated by those who want to highlight divisions, reignite tensions and profit from opposition and differences; rather, fraternity and sharing are invoked and longed for by those who desire the common good, and are above all pleasing to God, the Compassionate and All Merciful, who wishes his sons and daughters in the one human family to be ever more united among themselves and always in dialogue with one another. A great poet, a son of this land, wrote: “If you are human, mix with humans, because people go well with each other” (Nizami Ganjavi, The Book of Alexander, I, On his own state of life and the passage of time). Opening ourselves to others does not lead to impoverishment but rather enrichment, because it enables us to be more human: to recognize ourselves as participants in a greater collectivity and to understand our life as a gift for others; to see as the goal, not our own interests, but rather the good of humanity; to act with neither abstract idealism nor with interventionism, not by harmful interference or forceful actions, but rather out of respect for the dynamics of history, cultures and religious traditions.
Religions have an enormous task: to accompany men and women looking for the meaning of life, helping them to understand that the limited capacities of the human being and the goods of this world must never become absolutes. Again, Nizami wrote: “Do not base yourself solidly on your own strength, such that in heaven you will find no resting place! The fruits of this world are not eternal; do not adore that which perishes!” (Leylā and Majnūn, Death of Majnūn on the tomb of Leylā). Religions are called to help us understand that the centre of each person is outside of himself, that we are oriented towards the Most High and towards the other who is our neighbour. In this way, the vocation of human life is to set out towards the highest and truest love: this alone is the culmination of every authentically religious aspiration. For, as the poet says, “love is that which never mutates, love is that which has no end” (ibid, The Despair of Majnūn).
Humanity therefore needs religion if it is to reach its goal. Religion is a compass that orients us to the good and steers us away from evil, which is always crouching at the door of a person’s heart (cf. Gen4:7). Religions, therefore, have an educational task: to help bring out the best in each person. We, as guides, have a great responsibility, in order to offer authentic responses to men and women who are searching, who are often lost among the swirling contradictions of our time. Indeed, today we observe, on the one hand, the dominance of the nihilism of those who no longer believe in anything except their own wellbeing, advantage and profit, of those who throw life away, having become accustomed to the saying, “if God does not exist then everything is permissible” (cf. F.M. Dostoyevsky, The Brothers Karamazov, XI, 4.8.9); on the other hand, we see the growing emergence of rigid and fundamentalist reactions on the part of those who, through violent words and deeds, seek to impose extreme and radical attitudes which are furthest from the living God.
Religions, on the contrary, which help to discern the good and put it into practice through deeds, prayer and diligent cultivation of the inner life, are called to build a culture of encounter and peace, based on patience, understanding, and humble, tangible steps. This is the way a humane society is best served. For its part, society must always overcome the temptation to take advantage of religious factors: religions must never be instrumentalized, nor can they ever lend support to, or approve of, conflicts and disagreements.
There is, furthermore, a fruitfulness deriving from the virtuous rapport between society and religions, that respectful alliance which needs to be built up and protected, and which I would like to evoke with an image dear to this country. I refer to the precious artistic windows that have been here for centuries, crafted simply out of wood and tinted glass (Shebeke). When they are made using traditional methods, there is a peculiar characteristic: neither glue nor nails are used, but the wood and the glass are set into each other through time-consuming and meticulous effort. Thus, the wood supports the glass and the glass lets in the light. In the same way, it is the task of every civil society to support religion, which allows a light to shine through, indispensable for living. In order for this to happen, an effective and authentic freedom must be guaranteed. Artificial kinds of “glue” cannot be used, which bind people to believe, imposing on them a determined belief system and depriving them of the freedom to choose; nor is there a need for the external “nails” of worldly concerns, of the yearning for power and money. For God cannot be used for personal interests and selfish ends; he cannot be used to justify any form of fundamentalism, imperialism or colonialism. From this highly symbolic place, a heartfelt cry rises up once again: no more violence in the name of God! May his most holy Name be adored, not profaned or bartered as a commodity through forms of hatred and human opposition.
We honour, rather, the divine mercy that is given to us, through assiduous prayer and real dialogue, “a necessary condition for peace in the world… a duty for Christians as well as other religious communities” (Apostolic Exhortation Evangelii Gaudium, 250). Prayer and dialogue are profoundly interconnected: they flow from an openness of heart and extend to the good of others, thus enriching and reinforcing each other. The Catholic Church, in continuity with the Second Vatican Council, heartily “exhorts her sons and daughters, that through dialogue and collaboration with the followers of other religions, carried out with prudence and love and in witness to the Christian faith and life, they recognize, preserve and promote the good things, spiritual and moral, as well as the socio-cultural values found among these men and women (Second Vatican Ecumenical Council, Nostra Aetate, 2). This is not an accommodating “facile syncretism”, nor a “diplomatic openness which says yes to everything in order to avoid problems” (Apostolic Exhortation Evangelii Gaudium, 251), but rather a path of dialogue with others and a path of prayer for all: these are our means “of turning spears into pruning hooks” (cf. Is 2:4), to give rise to love where there is hatred, and forgiveness where there is offence, of never growing weary of imploring and tracing the ways of peace.
A true peace, founded on mutual respect, encounter and sharing, on the will to go beyond prejudices and past wrongs, on the rejection of double standards and self-interests; a lasting peace, animated by the courage to overcome barriers, to eradicate poverty and injustice, to denounce and put an end to the proliferation of weapons and immoral profiteering on the backs of others. The blood of far too many people cries out to God from the earth, our common home (cf. Gen 4:10). Today, we are challenged to give a response that can no longer be put off: to build together a future of peace; now is not the time for violent or abrupt solutions, but rather an urgent moment to engage in patient processes of reconciliation. The real question of our time is not how to advance our own causes - this is not the real question -, but what proposals for life are we offering to future generations; how to leave them a better world than the one we have received. God, and history itself, will ask us if we have spent ourselves pursuing peace; the younger generations, who dream of a different future, pointedly direct this question to us.
In this night of conflict that we are currently enduring, may religions be a dawn of peace, seeds of rebirth amid the devastation of death, echoes of dialogue resounding unceasingly, paths to encounter and reconciliation reaching even those places where official mediation efforts seem not to have borne fruit. Particularly in this beloved Caucasus region, which I have very much wished to visit and to which I have come as a pilgrim of peace, may religions be active agents working to overcome the tragedies of the past and the tensions of the present. May the inestimable richness of these countries be known and valued: the treasures old and ever new of the wisdom, culture and religious sensibility of the people of the Caucasus, are a tremendous resource for the future of the region and especially for European culture; they are goods which we cannot renounce. Thank you.
***
Thank you all. Thank you very much for the company ... And I ask you, please, to pray for me.
Read the whole story

· · · · · ·
Next Page of Stories
Loading...
Page 2

Pope Francis visits Alley of Martyrs in Baku - AZERTAC News

1 Share

AZERTAC News



Pope Francis visits Alley of Martyrs in Baku
AZERTAC News
Pope Francis has visited the Alley of Martyrs to commemorate Azerbaijani heroes who gave their lives for the country`s independence and territorial integrity. A ceremonial guard of honor was set up for the Pontiff here. Pope Francis laid a wreath at ...

and more »

Scalia's absence haunts Supreme Court's new term - USA TODAY

1 Share

USA TODAY



Scalia's absence haunts Supreme Court's new term
USA TODAY
WASHINGTON — Justice Antonin Scalia will be missing when the Supreme Court opens its 2016 term Monday, but his influence lives on in the cases the court has granted, denied and delayed. Before Scalia's death in February, the justices agreed to hear ...
Supreme Court Begins New Term Marked by UncertaintyNBCNews.com
Unusual start to new term: No arguments on Jewish New Year Washington Post
Unusual start to Supreme Court's new term: No arguments on Jewish New YearNorthJersey.com
The Detroit News-Bloomberg-Washington Examiner (blog)-Bloomberg BNA 




all 46
 Washington Examiner (blog)
all 43 news articles »

How Hillary Clinton Learned to Govern - The Atlantic

1 Share

The Atlantic



How Hillary Clinton Learned to Govern
The Atlantic
When Bill Clinton offered Arkansas businessman Mack McLarty the job of White House chief of staff in late 1992, McLarty quietly approached James A. Baker III, who had held the same position under two Republican presidents, to ask how best to prepare ...
Here come the Clintons: Hillary to Akron, Bill to CantonCanton Repository

all 78 news articles »

Suicide bombings kill at least eight in Baghdad - www.worldbulletin.net

1 Share



Suicide bombings kill at least eight in Baghdad
www.worldbulletin.net
In the deadliest attack, a bomber targeted a market in the Amil neighbourhood in southern Baghdad, killing at least six people and wounding 16 or more. World Bulletin / News Desk. Suicide bombers struck two Shiite-majority areas of the Iraqi capital on ...

and more »

Less than one month to go: Obamacare crunch time is here - Politico

1 Share

azcentral.com



Less than one month to go: Obamacare crunch time is here
Politico
Watchdog journalists say the ties between insurance commissioners and the insurance industry are too close, and thousands of striking nurses in Minnesota — unhappy over their health benefits — vote on a contract today. But first: We're entering the ...
Minnesota's Obamacare exchanges are in an 'emergency situation'Business Insider
Obama Says Obamacare Has 'Real Problems' Congress Refuses to FixBloomberg
Obamacare Website: Keep Your Plan? Maybe, Maybe NotThe Weekly Standard (blog)
Washington Examiner (blog) -Forbes -The Federalist -ConsumerAffairs
all 35 news articles »

Pope says respect gays and transsexuals, questions gender theory

1 Share
ABOARD THE PAPAL PLANE (Reuters) - Pope Francis said on Sunday that homosexuals and transsexuals should be treated with respect but that teaching gender theory is unacceptable "indoctrination" of young people.
  
Next Page of Stories
Loading...
Page 3

Taliban advance on Afghan city exposes weak defenses, deep divisions

1 Share
TARIN KOT, Afghanistan (Reuters) - Afghan authorities are investigating why Taliban militants were able to push past checkpoints in the central city of Tarin Kot with such ease during a recent attack that exposed the fragile defenses of many remote regions.
  

Turkish military says 15 rebels killed in clashes in Syria

1 Share
ISTANBUL (Reuters) - Fifteen Syrian rebels have been killed and 35 wounded in clashes in the last 24 hours in Syria, where Turkey launched a major military incursion in support of the rebels in late August, the Turkish military said on Monday.
  

Turkey's Erdogan says EU yet to deliver on aid pledge for migrants

1 Share
ANKARA (Reuters) - Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan criticized the European Union on Monday, saying the bloc had failed to fulfill its pledge to provide 3 billion euros of aid for migrants as part of a landmark deal to stem refugee flows to Europe.
  

Russia's Putin orders plutonium cleanup program with U.S. to be suspended

1 Share
MOSCOW (Reuters) - Russian President Vladimir Putin signed a decree on Monday to suspend an agreement with the United States on disposing of weapons-grade plutonium, a further sign of worsening ties between the former Cold War foes.
  

U.S. Sept. 11 law weakens international relations, Saudi cabinet says

1 Share
DUBAI (Reuters) - Saudi Arabia said on Monday that a U.S. law allowing citizens to sue the kingdom over the Sept. 11 2001 attacks represented a threat to international relations and urged Congress to act to prevent any dangerous consequences from the new legislation.
  

Syrian Military Calls On Aleppo Rebels To Surrender As Assault Continues

1 Share
The Syrian military has called on antigovernment forces to lay down their weapons and evacuate the besieged city of Aleppo, which is under a severe aerial attack by Syrian and Russian aircraft.

Next Page of Stories
Loading...
Page 4

Pope Francis Concludes Trip To Azerbaijan

1 Share
Pope Francis ended a one-day visit to Azerbaijan by meeting various religious leaders in Baku's Heidar Mosque.

-

Pope says walk with trans persons, but fight gender theory - Crux: Covering all things Catholic

1 Share

Crux: Covering all things Catholic

Pope says walk with trans persons, but fight gender theory
Crux: Covering all things Catholic
Pope Francis is flanked by Vatican Spokesman Greg Burke as he speaks with journalists on board the flight from Baku to Rome, Sunday, Oct. 2, 2016. Pope Francis praised Azerbaijan on Sunday as a model for a world divided by violent extremism, ...
Asia Pacific|Pope Francis Notes Azerbaijan's Religious Tolerance, Not Rights AbusesNew York Times 

Francis: Sexual morality determined case-by-case, even for transgenderNational Catholic Reporter
Gay, transgender people deserve pastoral care, pope says
 Catholic News Service 
Business Insider
 -Wall Street Journal -Patheos (blog)-Fox News
all 97 
news articles »

Pope Francis: Love those who struggle, but don't push gender theory on kids - Patheos (blog)

1 Share

Patheos (blog)

Pope Francis: Love those who struggle, but don't push gender theory on kids
Patheos (blog)
Aboard the papal plane, Oct 2, 2016 / 03:55 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- On his way back from Georgia and Azerbaijan Pope Francis criticized what he called the “wicked” push of gender theory in schools, but stressed that individuals who struggle with their ...

and more »
-

Pope Francis Praises Religious Tolerance in Azerbaijan

1 Share
(BAKU, Azerbaijan) — Pope Francis praised Azerbaijan on Sunday as a model for a world divided by violent extremism, sidestepping criticism of the government for the sake of encouraging religious tolerance in an often-volatile region where Catholics are a minority.
Francis avoided direct mention of criticism in the West over allegations of human rights abuses in Azerbaijan and a recent government referendum that extends the president’s term and gives him new powers.
The pope addressed a gathering of Muslim, Jewish and Orthodox leaders in Azerbaijan’s main mosque before heading back to Rome after a weekend Caucasus visit that first took him to Georgia.
“From this highly symbolic place, a heartfelt cry rises up once again: No more violence in the name of God!” Francis said. “May his most holy name be adored, not profaned or bartered as a commodity through forms of hatred and human opposition.”
The pope spent his 10 hours in the Azeri capital of Baku celebrating one of the world’s smallest Catholic communities and the good relations it enjoys with Azerbaijan’s Shiite Muslim majority and its Jewish, Orthodox and other religious minorities. There are only about 300 Azeri Catholics in Azerbaijan, though the community also includes several thousand foreigners.
“These good relations assume great significance for peaceful coexistence and for peace in the world,” Francis told President Ilham Aliyev and government officials. “They demonstrate that among followers of different religious confessions, cordial relations, respect and cooperation for the common good are possible.”
As a case in point, Francis celebrated Mass in Baku’s new Catholic Church, which was built with the financial help of Muslims and Jews, according to the Salesian priests who preside there. The Azeri government donated a plot of land on the outskirts of the capital after St. John Paul II visited in 2002, but it took the help of non-Christians to get the structure built.
“Have courage! Go on, without fear! Go ahead!” Francis urged the 400 Catholic faithful in the church and another 450 seated outside in the courtyard.
At the end of the Mass, the half-dozen Salesian priests who minister to Azerbaijani Catholics gave Francis a hand-woven carpet depicting both the church and the Maiden’s Tower, a 12th-century bastion in Baku’s walled Old City that is probably Azerbaijan’s most recognizable structure. Azerbaijan is famed for its magnificent carpets.
“I cannot contain my boundless joy,” parishioner Eva Agalarova, 61, said of Francis’ visit.
Last week, Azerbaijan’s Central Election Commission said more than 80 percent of voters in the former Soviet republic backed a constitutional amendment extending the presidential term from five to seven years. Other provisions granted the president the right to dissolve parliament, and created new vice presidential jobs and cancelled age limits.
Aliyev’s opponents, as well as human rights organizations including Amnesty International and Freedom House, said the moves would cement a dynastic rule in the oil-rich Caspian Sea nation. The Azerbaijani government has rejected the criticism, saying the constitutional amendments aim to cut red tape and speed up economic reforms.
Francis didn’t address the criticism directly, though he spoke of the “significant efforts” Azerbaijan has made over the 25 years since its independence to strengthen civic institutions. Such a general exhortation suggested Francis didn’t want to rock the boat for his small flock here given the good relations the Catholic Church enjoys with the government.
Aliyev, for his part, called Francis’ visit historic.
“You are sending a clear message to the world here from Baku that multiculturalism, interfaith dialogue and goodwill has to prevail,” he said to applause in the striking Zaha Hadid-designed Baku conference center, one of the many modern buildings that have sprung up in Baku in recent years.
Francis’ visit to Azerbaijan bookended his June visit to neighboring Armenia, where he appealed for peace between two former Soviet republics over Nagorno-Karabakh. The region is officially part of Azerbaijan, but since a separatist war ended in 1994, it has been under the control of forces that claim to be local ethnic Armenians but that Azerbaijan claims include the Armenian military.
In his speech, Francis expressed his solidarity with “those who have had to leave their land” and urged the countries involved to “courageously” find paths of peace. With the help of the international community, he urged both sides in the conflict to “grasp every opportunity” to end the conflict.
Zemfira Mamedova, 70, said the pope’s call for a peaceful resolution was the key expectation of his visit.
“The pope already was in Yerevan several months ago,” Mamedova said. “Now we are expecting his call for peace and for the return of our land in Karabakh. This is our most main expectation.”
Aliyev, in office since succeeding his father in 2003, has firmly allied the Shiite Muslim nation with the West, helping secure its energy and security interests and offset Russia’s influence in the strategic Caspian region.


-