Friday, October 14, 2016

How Donald Trump destroyed the GOP



How Donald Trump destroyed the GOP
Mike Pence Just Opened The Door To Republican Destruction While Defending Trump
Cut Ties to Donald Trump, Big Donors Urge R.N.C. - The New York Times
‘This Doesn’t Throw Me’: Trump Backers Unfazed by Claims of Bad Behavior - The New York Times
The Clinton Agenda - The New York Times
The 2016 electoral map is collapsing around Donald Trump - The Washington Post
Charts: A visual history of how presidential elections affect US financial markets — Quartz
The GOP is history. What about the country? - The Washington Post
Greek yogurt is no longer the trendiest yogurt - The Washington Post
Melania Trump’s demand for a retraction by People magazine is simply amazing - The Washington Post
Clinton’s national security allies rip Trump for not condemning Russia’s alleged role in email hacking - The Washington Post
Amid crisis, Trump spreads another conspiracy theory — about his campaign - The Washington Post
NBC News explains its handling of the Trump video. It still doesn’t all add up. - The Washington Post
It’s not the ‘locker room’ talk. It’s the ‘lock her up’ talk. - The Washington Post
US mulling military options in Syria – Middle East Monitor
OPEC and Russia deal will prevent US shale coming back online: RBC’S Croft
Helsinki Versus Yalta: A Conversation About Russia with NATO’s Vershbow - Real Time Brussels - WSJ
Helsinki Versus Yalta: A Conversation About Russia with NATO’s Vershbow - Google Search
Helsinki Versus Yalta: A Conversation...
Why the West needs to treat Russia like a pariah | New York Post
Russian Analytical Digest No 189: State Duma Elections - News Article – Center for Security Studies | ETH Zurich
Russians prefer Trump over Clinton by wide margin | Fox News Latino
Fresh Wave of Airstrikes Hit Syria's...
Entire US political system 'under...
Campaign 2016 updates: Obama says GOP...
comparison of US and Russian elections - Google Search
trump and republican party - Google Search
Do police officers shootings increase trump election chances? - Google Search
Do police officers shootings increased trump election chances? - Google Search

Posts - 10.14.16


News Reviews and Opinions: Politics Review

10.13.16 - W


Cut Ties to Donald Trump, Big Donors Urge R.N.C. - The New York Times
Trump's War with the Media Reaches a New Level
RealClearPolitics - 2016 Latest 2016 Presidential General Election Polls
One of the woman to accuse Donald Trump speaks to CNN's Anderson Cooper | Daily Mail Online
Report: Trump apologizes for Serbian bombing, aligns himself with Russian position
Donald Trump's moment of reckoning - CNNPolitics.com
Donald Trump, Buying Late, Pays More...
Trump Bashes the 'Corrupt Political Establishment'
Watch: Trump responds to new harassment allegations, attacks Clinton - YouTube
Trump Denies Groping Allegations, Slams Clinton - YouTube
Trump on People writer: Look at her, I don't think so - YouTube
Trump threatens to sue NYT amid allegations of groping - YouTube
Donald Trump Finds Improbable Ally in WikiLeaks - The New York Times
Donald Trump’s Toxic Masculinity - The New York Times
Donald Trump’s Scary Election Day Gambit - The New York Times
The Spy We Forgot - The New York Times
FBI and CIA Politicized by Comey, Brennan
Russian-born Swedish Official Prompts ‘Security Risk’ Worries
News Article – Center for Security Studies | ETH Zurich
'TOTAL FABRICATION': Trump denies multiple accusers' abuse claims
Tweets with replies by Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) | Twitter
Donald Trump's Legacy Could Live On After the Election - The Atlantic
The Latest: Actress in video calls...
Is Donald Trump a Charismatic Leader? - The Atlantic
Putting Trump Into Historical Perspective
EDITORIAL: A troubled political psyche - Loudoun Times-Mirror
Russia-US relationship keeps getting worse - CNNPolitics.com
Middle East|Syria Activists Say More...
Putin And The November Election In The U.S.: Donald Trump Is His Patsy | Huffington Post
Trump and Clinton Have Shortcomings...

Bob Dylan


The Quotable Bob Dylan - The New York Times
bob dylan - Google Search
Bob Dylan, Titan Of American Music,...
bob dylan - YouTube
Bob Dylan The Times They Are A Changin' 1964 - YouTube
Don't Think Twice It's All Right - Bob Dylan - YouTube
bob dylan fbi files - Google Search
bob dylan is clown with biblical pretensions - Google Search

Posts - 10.13.16


News Reviews and Opinions: Nobel Prize in Literature Awarded to Bob Dylan Wall Street Journal The 2016 Nobel Prize in Literature was awarded to musician Bob Dylan for creating new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition. | Bob Dylan The Times They Are A Changin' 1964
The U.S. and Global Security Review: Police officers shootings
The U.S. and Global Security Review: War on police
The U.S. and Global Security Review: Russia has 'playbook' for covert influence in Eastern Europe: study
The U.S. and Global Security Review: Donald Trump threatens to sue New York Times over sexual harassment report - CNNMoney
RUSSIA and THE WEST - РОССИЯ и ЗАПАД: Russia, Medvedev, and the change of the elites
RUSSIA and THE WEST - РОССИЯ и ЗАПАД: Какой будет жизнь в стране в ближайшие три года Thursday October 13th, 2016 at 10:52 AM
News Reviews and Opinions: Donald Trump threatens to sue New York Times
The U.S. and Global Security Review: Two Boston Police Officers Wounded, Suspect Dead in Shooting by Reuters Thursday October 13th, 2016 at 2:12 PM

10.12.16 - W


It’s OK to speculate about Donald Trump’s mental health.
EDITORIAL: Putin's ploy: Once a KGB agent, always a KGB agent | Opinion | annistonstar.com
Ronald Ettinger: The perils of narcissism in politics - Entertainment & Life - The State Journal-Register - Springfield, IL
Myth of Russian Power | Huffington Post
The downward trajectory of Moscow, Washington relations | Daily Mail Online
Russians, lies and WikiLeaks - POLITICO
Nations to hold session on Syria | NWADG
Putin ally tells Americans: vote Trump or face nuclear war | Reuters
The Daily 202: Republican politicians fall back in line behind Trump after defecting - The Washington Post
Split Over Donald Trump Threatens to Tilt Republican States - The New York Times
Russia and United States to Host New Diplomatic Meeting on Syria - The New York Times
How long HAS Donald Trump been working for Russia? | CJOnline.com
.:Middle East Online:::.
Man charged with murder in deaths of...
Latino Vote is 'Front and Center' in...
Russia: U.S. accusation Moscow...
Mike Pence "disappointed" with...
60 Seconds
www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/doctors-significantly-better-than-google-according-to-new-research_us_57fe4d59e4b05eff55809fd9
Did WikiLeaks make Hillary Clinton look two-faced, or clear-eyed? - The Washington Post
Your Surgeon Is Probably a Republican, Your Psychiatrist Probably a Democrat - The New York Times
Physician Specialties Correlate With Political Affiliation
Psychiatric Times | Psychiatric Times
Netherlands may extend assisted dying to those who feel 'life is complete' | World news | The Guardian
FBI, DOJ roiled by Comey, Lynch decision to let Clinton slide by on emails, says insider | Fox News
Survivor of Connecticut Plane Crash Tells of Argument in Cockpit - The New York Times

Posts - 10.12.16


News Reviews and Opinions: Trumpism: the vicissitudes of the phenomenon: "Trump continues to display the symptoms of narcissistic alexithymia..." - Donald Trump’s Sad, Lonely Life | "Trump’s has been a single-note campaign; that note is rage..." - Trumpism After Trump
News Reviews and Opinions: M.N.: Trump-Samson destroyed the GOP, alarmingly, tragically, destructively and self-destructively. The party will be reborn from this crisis and this bitter lesson. But he will not be able to destroy the country. This is the consolation.
News Reviews and Opinions: Donald Trump Is ‘Dangerous’ for Global Stability, U.N. Rights Chief Says
The U.S. and Global Security Review: The Early Edition: October 12, 2016 by Zoë Chapman Wednesday October 12th, 2016 at 12:25 PM
The U.S. and Global Security Review: Saudi airstrikes on Yemeni civilians may have put a target on the backs of U.S. troops
RUSSIA and THE WEST - РОССИЯ и ЗАПАД: How long HAS Donald Trump been working for Russia? - Topeka Capital Journal (blog) Wednesday October 12th, 2016 at 2:10 PM
The U.S. and Global Security Review: Putin says U.S. hacking scandal not in Russia's interestsby ReutersVideo
News Reviews and Opinions: John Podesta tells reporters he believes Trump's campaign "had advanced warning" before WikiLeaks published his emails. | » Putin says U.S. hacking scandal not in Russia's interests 12/10/16 14:37 from Mike Nova's Shared Newslinks | How long HAS Donald Trump been working for Russia? | CJOnline.com Split Over Donald Trump Threatens to Tilt Republican States - The New York Times Russia and United States to Host New Diplomatic Meeting on Syria - The New York Times
Behavior and Law: Psychiatry, Politics, and National Security
The U.S. and Global Security Review: FBI News Review | FBI and J. Comey - 10.1.16 Update
News Reviews and Opinions: Recent Events Review

Recent Events Review and other Searches - October 2016


Trump threatens to sue NYT - Google Search
police officers shootings - Google Search
police officers shootings - Facebook Search
palm springs california - Google Search
john felix palm springs ca - Google Search
train derailed near New York - Google Search
Harold Thomas Martin - Google Search
News - Harold Thomas Martin - Google Search
nsa contractor - Google Search
Russia influence in Eastern Europe - Google Search

The Analysis of Donald Trump


The U.S. and Global Security Review: Can Fancy Bear Be Stopped? | The Analysis of Donald Trump | Personal health issues of candidates - 2016 presidential election - Links

___________________________________________

Clinton’s national security allies rip Trump for not condemning Russia’s alleged role in email hacking

1 Share

A visual history of how presidential elections affect US financial markets — Quartz

1 Share
Stress over the this year’s election has reached the level of an unhappy fever dream. An editorial in the Los Angeles Times warned that a Trump victory could prompt a coup. A New York Times bestseller compared Trump’s battle against Clinton to Armageddon. If there is one thing we know about panicky people, it’s that they generally don’t make great choices with their money. Observers such as Bill Maher and Mark Cuban have speculated that a Trump victory could spark a stock market crash. Cut to an image of millions of people stuffing cash into their mattresses.
History suggests such a dramatic outcome is unlikely. In fact, there is little evidence that the markets react much at all to elections in the short-term. In the charts below we’ve plotted how major US markets, ranging from treasuries to gold, have been affected by the last six presidential elections.
The results are, for the most part, underwhelming. There is no obvious trend, nor are there are any clear outliers except for 2008, when the election took place in the middle of an ongoing economic meltdown.
It’s human nature to spot trends, especially in things as omnipresent as politics and financial markets. For example, some pundits made a big deal of a sharp market decline after President Obama was re-elected in 2012. However, such affects are usually transient. The market recovered from that downturn within 30 trading days.
Of course, none of these charts say that the election of a new president won’t affect markets at all. Over the long term, policy choices made by a new president will have a major impact on US businesses. Heavily regulated industries are the most likely to be affected. Clinton’s negative statements about drug pricing have already caused tumult in biotech stocks, a sector that is sensitive to changes in federal policy.
It’s crucial to remember that markets are fundamentally unpredictable. Panics and manias happen from time to time. Donald Trump is a new kind of candidate. It is not a cliche to report that anything is possible. However, that doesn’t mean that we should expect financial fireworks on election day. The data show that markets are more resistant than we tend to give them credit for.

How Donald Trump destroyed the GOP

2 Shares
Sign Up for
Our free email newsletters

America has never seen a stranger presidential debate than the town hall that took place in St. Louis Sunday night.
Don't buy the spin (or the expressions of jittery relief from Republicans) for a second: Trump didn't "win." He didn't transform himself into a new, improved, and appealing candidate. On that stage, Trump was very much himself: a know-nothing demagogue who does one thing very well, which is channel and amplify the ill-informed, maniacal rage of one faction of his party.
When a party is functioning well, the passions of individual factions get subsumed into and sublimated by the institution as a whole. But in order to function, the party's leadership and its factions need to speak the same language and understand themselves to agree on certain core ideals, strategies, and tactics.
None of this is true about the GOP today. No, the GOP is burning to the ground, and Donald Trump is fanning the flames.
From the moment he launched his campaign for president, Donald Trump demonstrated that he did unmodulated, contemptuous fury better than any of his 16 opponents. Our immigration policy was adisaster, he said. As was ObamaCare. And the Iran deal. And the Iraq War. And the economy. And our conduct of the war on terror. Complete disasters, all of them. Pathetic.
To those members of the party whose view of the world has been shaped for more than 20 years by rabblerousers on talk radio and cable news, Trump sounded like a long-awaited savior. Finally someone to tear it all down — the Democrats, yes, but also the Republicans who run the party.
Back in 1968, George Wallace ran a populist kamikaze campaign not entirely dissimilar to Trump's. He championed the grievances of members of the Democratic Party who dissented from its social liberalism and embrace of the civil rights movement. But he did this as a third-party candidate. Trump is doing something similar — channeling the rage of voters who feel disrespected and ignored by the Republican leadership — from within the Republican Party itself. This is a problem.
Trump is destroying the GOP in order to rebuild it in his own image and the image of the angry faction he now leads — and there's nothing the party's leadership can do about it. They endorse him and he humiliates them. They denounce him and he doubles down. They beg, implore, plead with him: Please stop insulting people. Please apologize and show contrition for bragging about sexual assault in the most vulgar terms possible. Please don't go after your opponent by humiliating her for her husband's behavior.
Please stop behaving like a tabloid sleaze-monger and start acting like a president.
Trump's response? He holds a press conference with Bill Clinton's accusers before the start of the debate, seats them in the hall with his own family, and injects them into the debate itself. He declares that if he wins the election, he would throw his opponent in jail. He praises Vladimir Putin right after he's asked a question about credible evidence that the Russian government hacked the servers of the Democratic National Committee in an effort to interfere with the presidential election. He stands by Syria's Bashar al-Assad right after he's asked a question about the ongoing bloodbath in Aleppo. He asserts, apropos of nothing in particular, that Hillary Clinton "has tremendous hate in her heart." He throws his own running mate under the bus for daring to speak critically of Putin.
And of course, he spoke of disasters, disasters everywhere: the economy, ObamaCare, Syria, ISIS, Libya, NAFTA. He spewed lies and blatantly misleading exaggerations. The performance was at once sordid and cartoonish in its extremism. The Trump faction of the GOP must have been thrilled.
But a faction is not a party, and a faction isn't capable of winning a national election.
Donald Trump has destroyed the GOP. It will be up to those who come after his ill-fated reign of devastation to figure out how to put it back together again.
Read the whole story

· · ·

‘This Doesn’t Throw Me’: Trump Backers Unfazed by Claims of Bad Behavior

1 Share
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. — Some supporters of Donald J. Trump saw media collusion. Others said accusations had been embellished. And a few said that no matter how Mr. Trump had behaved, he should get a pass because of all he represents.
In a dozen interviews with Mr. Trump’s supporters before his rally here Thursday, nearly every one dismissed a series of reports about his misbehavior toward women, questioning the motives of the accusers and the timing of the revelations so close to Election Day.
Judy Weimer, 75, of Port St. Lucie, was one of those crying foul. She said that the disclosures were an effort by the Democratic Party to derail Mr. Trump’s candidacy, and that the accusations “don’t worry me a bit.” She said she also believed that Mr. Trump had acted as all rich men did decades ago.
“Something may have happened,” she said of the accusations reported by The New York Times that Mr. Trump had grabbed a woman’s breast and put his hand up her skirt while seated next to her on an airplane. “But when I look at it, I see this woman 30 years ago, I see a tall, nice-looking rich man that’ll go with, you know, they get the women, you know they do,” she said. “The movie stars, the basketball stars, they get them.”
“And in a way, he’s absolutely right that they can do just about anything they want to with them people,” she continued, alluding to a 2005 recording of Mr. Trump boasting about how he had forced himself on women. “I don’t think it’s right, but they can do it. It’s the women. I don’t think groping anybody is right. But they do get away with it.”
Maureen Owens, 64, of West Palm Beach shared a similar skepticism about the origin of the accusations, particularly the episode on the airplane, which the accuser, Jessica Leeds, said happened in the early 1980s.
“I’m skeptical of all media reports,” Ms. Owens said. “Things happened so long ago. He’s a 70-year-old man putting us on the right track. I’m totally, 100 percent behind him.”
She added: “I worked as a flight attendant for 34 years on flights with professional athletes, politicians, movie stars — I’ve seen bad behavior all my life. This doesn’t throw me.”
Dianne DeWolfe, 73, of Palm Beach Gardens said she thought the accusers were “embellishing what might have happened,” and she questioned the timing of the revelations.
“It’s baloney to come out now,” she said. “They’re opportunists. Listen, no man attacks a woman unless she’s looking like she’s asking for it.”
Others felt the accusations merely highlighted flaws that they already knew Mr. Trump had, but ones that they had come to accept, given how he could lead the country.
“When you look at Saul back in the Bible, he was able to redeem himself and become the Apostle Paul,” said Kathy Reece, 50, who lives in nearby Royal Palm Beach. “God uses people, some of the people in the worst circumstances, to do his work for him.
“A lot of what we’re seeing is you have somebody like Trump, and he’s a pig, I mean, I know that,” she continued. “But he’s going to do what’s best for the country, and I think through that, he’s going to redeem himself and he’s going to redeem the country.”
Paul Rogers, 48, of Wellington, said the accusers should be believed but supporters were right to question the timing of the revelations, coming little more than three weeks before the election, and how they all landed at seemingly the same time.
“Everyone should believe all woman by default, period,” Mr. Rogers said. “That said, every single woman’s story comes forward in the same afternoon, after a year and a half of 30 billion of free media?”
There was, however, one Trump supporter who suggested that if “definitive proof” came out, he would be willing to change his mind.
“I’m pretty open-minded, so as long as there’s proof of something like that, things happen and minds are changed,” said Austin Murray, 19, of West Palm Beach. “But until I see solid proof that that actually happened, then my decision is made.”
Continue reading the main story
Read the whole story

· · ·

Donald Trump Declares Himself Freed From Republican Party 'Shackles' - Wall Street Journal

1 Share

Wall Street Journal



Donald Trump Declares Himself Freed From Republican Party 'Shackles'
Wall Street Journal
Donald Trump declared on Tuesday morning that he had been freed from “the shackles” of theRepublican Party and would now campaign as he saw fit, furthering his split from the party he deemed disloyal to him. In a series of messages on Twitter, the GOP ...
Donald Trump is blowing up the Republican PartyWashington Post
Donald Trump launches war on Paul Ryan, slams Republican PartyCNBC
Donald Trump splits the Republican PartyAljazeera.com (blog)
New York Times -MSNBC -Columbia Missourian -Washington Post
all 6,712 news articles »

Lou Dobbs is what's wrong with Trump's Republican Party - Business Insider

1 Share

Business Insider



Lou Dobbs is what's wrong with Trump's Republican Party
Business Insider
Dobbs is symptomatic of the broad problems in the Republican Party that led to Donald Trump: These people will believe any lie, no matter how obvious, if it flatters their political preconceptions. Fox Business, theoretically, has a standards-and ...
Lou Dobbs tweets Trump accuser's address and phone numberPolitico
Fox Business' Lou Dobbs appears to dox Trump accuser on Twitter - Business InsiderBusiness Insider
Two Women Say Donald Trump Touched Them InappropriatelyNew York Times

all 28 news articles »
Next Page of Stories
Loading...
Page 2

Mike Pence Just Opened The Door To Republican Destruction While Defending Trump - PoliticusUSA

1 Share

PoliticusUSA



Mike Pence Just Opened The Door To Republican Destruction While Defending Trump
PoliticusUSA
Pence was the chosen candidate of the Republican establishment. If Pence goes down withTrump, the Republican Party goes down with Trump. Pence is viewed as the bridge betweenTrump and the GOP, and the bridge has now expanded the allegations ...
How Donald Trump destroyed the GOPThe Week Magazine
A generation of GOP stars stands diminished: 'Everything Trump touches dies'Washington Post
List: Which Republicans are abandoning Trump and which are sticking by him?CNN
Roll Call -BBC News -Slate Magazine -Washington Post
all 2,134 news articles »

US mulling military options in Syria – Middle East Monitor

US President Barack Obama and his top foreign policy advisers are expected to meet today to consider their military and other options in Syria, as Syrian and Russian aircraft continue to pummel Aleppo and other targets, US officials said.
Some top officials argue the United States must act more forcefully in Syria or risk losing what influence it still has over moderate rebels and its Arab, Kurdish and Turkish allies in the fight against Daesh, the officials told Reuters.
One set of options includes direct US military action such as airstrikes on Syrian military bases, munitions depots or radar and anti-aircraft bases, said one official who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss internal deliberations.
This official said one danger of such action is that Russian and Syrian forces are often co-mingled, raising the possibility of a direct confrontation with Russia that Obama has been at pains to avoid.
US officials said they consider it unlikely that Obama will order US airstrikes on Syrian government targets, and they stressed that he may not make any decisions at today’s National Security Council meeting.
One alternative, US officials said, is allowing allies to provide US-vetted rebels with more sophisticated weapons, although not shoulder-fired anti-aircraft missiles, which Washington fears could be used against Western airliners.
Today’s planned meeting is the latest in a long series of internal debates about what, if anything, to do to end a civil war that is now in reaching its sixth year, has killed 400,000 people according to the UN and displaced half the country’s population.
The ultimate aim of any new action could be to bolster the battered moderate rebels so they can weather what is now widely seen as the inevitable fall of rebel-held eastern Aleppo to the forces of Russian and Iranian-backed Syrian President Bashar Al-Assad.
It also might temper a sense of betrayal among moderate rebels who feel Obama encouraged their uprising by calling for Assad to go but then abandoned them, failing even to enforce his own “red line” against Assad’s use of chemical weapons.
US policy is instead focused on targeting Daesh and Jabhat Fateh Al-Sham (JFS), formerly the Al-Nusra Front, a decision that has opened it to charges that it is doing nothing to prevent the humanitarian catastrophe in Syria and particularly in Aleppo, Syria’s largest city.
Anthony Cordesman of Washington’s Center for Strategic and International Studies think tank toldReuters that the United States’ failure to act earlier in Syria, and in Aleppo in particular, had narrowed Obama’s options.
“There is only so long you can ignore your options before you don’t have any,” Cordesman said.
Read the whole story

· ·


Share this story

Russian Patriarch’s visit to queen stirs some complaints

1 Share
The head of Russia’s Orthodox Church begins a four-day visit to Britain Saturday that includes an audience with Queen Elizabeth II, but his visit has stirred some resistance because of his strong support of Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Helsinki Versus Yalta: A Conversation About Russia with NATO’s Vershbow - Real Time Brussels

1 Share
NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, right, congratulates outgoing Deputy Secretary General Alexander Vershbow at his last meeting of alliance ambassadors.ENLARGE
NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, right, congratulates outgoing Deputy Secretary General Alexander Vershbow at his last meeting of alliance ambassadors. Photo: NATO
The North Atlantic Treaty Organization’s Alexander Vershbow steps down Monday as deputy secretary-general, capping a career that spans nearly four decades that has helped shape the approach of the United States and the Western allies to the Soviet Union and Russia. He sat down with The Wall Street Journal this week to discuss relations with Russia. Edited excerpts follow.
Q. You have been dealing with Russia for the bulk of your career. Talk about the arc of the relationship as you have seen it. Where do we stand now?
“I became a student of Russia when I was still in high school when I had the chance to study the language and visited the Soviet Union in 1969. Ten years later, I was a young diplomat in the embassy in Moscow. It was a bleak period. It was a global superpower competition. But there was, by that time, a certain element of predictability to the relationship, at least in the birthplace of the Cold War, Europe…”
“The main competition was on the global arena, Afghanistan … Ethiopia, Angola and Nicaragua. The competition was outside of Europe but inside Europe we were achieving a certain element of stability.
“Fast forward to my first tour at NATO in 1991 when, thanks to the Gorbachev phenomenon, the Cold War came to an end, mostly peacefully. We were able to make enormous strides to healing the divisions of Europe… Despite differences over [NATO] enlargement, we were able to work with the Russians. We even had Russian peacekeepers shoulder to shoulder with NATO soldiers in Bosnia and later in Kosovo.
“The possibility of a partnership was still there when I arrived as deputy secretary-general in 2012. … But the world changed in 2014. In some ways it was back to the rivalry of the Cold War but it is also very different. Because when I served in Brezhnev’s Russia and worked at the State Department desk in ’80s and headed the desk in the late ’80s, Russia was interested in strengthening the rules-based system. Russia was trying to create a stable status quo… We were able to cooperate in Europe and achieve a basic stability. We don’t have that any more. Putin is a revisionist leader who wants to, I think, roll back the post-Cold War settlement…
“We have a situation where Russia does not accept the rules in Europe and so therefore Europe is the most unstable peace. That is different than the Cold War. They are not a status-quo power. They want to reestablish spheres of influence. Our model is Helsinki. Their model is Yalta.”
Q: What are the implications of that, what are the prospects for dialogue?
“We have to be realistic about how much we can achieve with Russia. We can’t be fatalistic. We have to try to convince them to lower the risks in the relationship, restore transparency and predictability so that inadvertent incidents don’t spin out of control. But going back to the more creative achievements of the détente period, much less the post-Cold War period, the prospects are pretty dim.
“Reaching agreements on anything will be more difficult. but it is in our own vital interests, and we have to persuade the Russians that it is in their own vital interests, to manage what is going to be a competitive relationship overall. But at least to restore some of the predictability and stability we used to have in the détente period.
“But that requires a political decision in Moscow that they want to be transparent… We have taken the moral and justifiable stance when it comes to going back practical cooperation, to business as usual, it is simply impossible as long as they remain entrenched in Ukraine.  It would be a betrayal of the Ukrainians and our principles to basically let bygones be bygones. We made that mistake—to some degree—after the Georgia war.”
Q: What are the prospects that sanctions against Russia for their actions in Ukraine will be extended?
“There are political leaders in and out of government who complain about the economic burden and some who are prepared to reach an accommodation with Russia… Overall Europe has been steadfast and shown they are much more willing to stay the course than Putin may have calculated.”
Q. Will we see a NATO-Russia Council meeting in October?
“It is not clear when it will take place but I think it will happen in the coming weeks. We gave our reaction to the various proposals they presented at the July 13 NRC… We saw the Russians trying to get around our decisions to suspend practical cooperation. But on some issues, like aviation safety, we are ready to continue the discussion.”
Read the whole story

· · · ·

US sees more signs Russia feeding emails to WikiLeaks

1 Share
As WikiLeaks continues to publish emails belonging to Clinton campaign chair John Podesta, US officials told CNN that there is growing evidence that Russia is using the organization as a delivery vehicle for the messages and other stolen information.
The methods of the disclosures "suggest Moscow is at least providing the information or is possibly directly responsible for the leaks," one US official said.
US intelligence officials are still investigating the degree of connection between Russia and WikiLeaks but they remain confident that Russia is behind the leaks themselves.
CNN attempted to reach WikiLeaks for comment but received no response. WikiLeaks's founder, Julian Assange, has previously denied any connection to or cooperation with Russia.
Russia's highest officials are dismissing accusations that Moscow is trying to sway the US presidential election with cyber attacks, speaking out before the latest accusation concerning WikiLeaks was shared with CNN on Thursday.
President Vladimir Putin ridiculed such talk Wednesday as "hysteria."
"If they decided to do something, let them do it," Lavrov told Amanpour. "But to say that Russia is interfering in the United States domestic matters is ridiculous."
The Director of National Intelligence -- representing 19 US intelligence agencies -- and the Department of Homeland Security leveled unambiguous charges against Russia on Friday. And the comments from Moscow did little to quell the growing criticism of Russia Wednesday from the Obama administration and Hillary Clinton's campaign.
"The kinds of disclosures that we've seen, including at WikiLeaks, of stolen e-mails from people who play an important role in our political process is consistent with Russian- directed efforts," White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest said Wednesday.
Podesta, whose emails are being published by WikiLeaks, also pointed the finger at Russia.

'Work of the Russian government'

"It is now clear that the illegal hack of my personal email account was -- just like the other recent, election-related hacks -- the work of the Russian government," Podesta said in a statement. "This level of meddling by a foreign power can only be aimed at boosting Donald Trump and should send chills down the spine of all Americans, regardless of political party."
Podesta earlier accused Roger Stone, a long-time adviser to Republican nominee Donald Trump, of having advance knowledge of the recent hack and publication of his emails on the website WikiLeaks, founded by Julian Assange. Stone had penned a tweet in August saying, "Trust me, it will soon (be) the Podesta's time in the barrel.
CNN/ORC poll, September 28 – October 2, 2016, sampling error: +/- 3 percentage points, sample: 1,213 likely voters
"I think it's a reasonable assumption to -- or at least a reasonable conclusion -- that Mr. Stone had advanced warning and the Trump campaign had advanced warning about what Assange was going to do," Podesta told reporters Tuesday.
But Stone rejected Podesta's assertion, telling CNN he "had no foreknowledge" of the WikiLeaks publication of Podesta's emails.
The accusations and denials are just the latest and perhaps most extraordinary way that Russia has become a factor in the wildly unpredictable 2016 presidential campaign. Ongoing questions about Trump's ties to Russia are now interspersed with Democratic accusations that Russia is actively trying to help the New York real-estate mogul reach the White House.
"We have never in the history of our country been in a situation where an adversary, a foreign power, is working so hard to influence the outcome of the election," Clinton said at the second presidential debate on Sunday. "And believe me, they're not doing it to get me elected. They're doing it to try to influence the election for Donald Trump."
Trump batted back the accusations at a rally in Ocala, Florida, Wednesday.
"Anything that goes wrong they blame Russia," Trump told the crowd. "We are being hacked because we have people who don't know what they are doing. They always blame Russia."
"They say Donald Trump is friends with Putin. I don't know Putin, folks," Trump added. "What the hell do I have to do with Putin?"

Trump and Putin

At a time when US-Russia relations are the worst they've been in decades, that question -- what does Trump have to do with Putin? -- still lingers.
Trump has called on Moscow to hack into Clinton's computers, downplayed criticism of Putin's authoritarian tendencies, tried to suggest that Russia hasn't hacked US systems and promoted foreign policy positions that jibe more closely with Moscow's than Washington's. He's relied on aides with ties to Russia and most recently, quoted an incorrect Russian news report to raise questions about Clinton.
For its part, Russia's ambassador to the United Nations formally complained last month about a top UN official's criticism of Trump and right-wing European politicians.
Trump actively called on Russia to help him against Clinton in July, when he called on Moscow to find missing Clinton emails from her tenure as secretary of state.
"Russia, are you listening?" Trump said from the stage of a rally, calling for a foreign country to interfere in an election, an unprecedented moment in presidential politics.
And yet at Sunday's debate, the Republican candidate floated the possibility that Russia isn't behind the hacking at all, saying that Clinton "doesn't know if it's the Russians doing the hacking. Maybe there is no hacking."
In an interview Wednesday with CNN's Brianna Keilar, Trump campaign manager Kellyanne Conway said the campaign has no knowledge about the hack. But she said Trump is "of course" concerned about the potential of meddling in US politics.
"Are we going to put this back on Donald Trump?" Conway said. "Is he the hacker?"
After Trump threatened at Sunday's debate to jail Clinton if he wins the White House, former chess world champion Garry Kasparov, a fierce Putin critic, took to Twitter to note that Trump seemed to be emulating Putin's style. Kasparov noted that crackdowns on media and political opponents are "also Putin's checklist."

Trump's foreign policy positions

Trump has taken foreign policy positions that analysts say would please Russia, declaring in March that he would consider pulling the US out of NATO because it's "obsolete" and "is costing us a fortune." The 28-member organization, founded in 1949 to defend against the Soviet Union, is the core US-Atlantic security mechanism.
In August, Trump said Russia wouldn't enter Ukraine, despite Moscow's annexation of Crimea in early 2014. He later clarified to say he meant that Russia wouldn't enter Ukraine if he were president.
At Sunday's debate, Trump insisted that Russia is targeting ISIS in Syria, despite repeated assessments by US security officials that Russian troops are spending more time focused on moderate opposition groups, including those backed by the US.
Trump campaign advisers have had ties to Russia. Former campaign chairman Paul Manafort lobbied on behalf of Russian-backed Ukrainian president Viktor Yanukovich. Carter Page, described at one point by the campaign as an informal policy advisor, reportedly had investments in Russian gas company Gazprom and has publicly criticized the US in a speech in Moscow. Trump campaign manager
Conway told CNN's Jake Tapper in September that Page is no longer part of the campaign.
A Trump security adviser, Lt. General Mike Flynn, the retired head of the Defense Intelligence Agency, attended a December gala for the the state-backed Russia Today television network, placed two seats away from Putin, according to Politico.
Trump's refusal to release his tax returns makes it impossible to get a full sense of his investments and whether he has any in Russia, but he does have business ties to Russians.
Trump has also written about trying to build a Trump property in Moscow since 1987 in his book "The Art of the Deal," signing his most recent deal to build in Moscow in 2013, according to the Washington Post.
The Republican candidate worked with Russian oligarchs to stage the Miss Universe pageant to Moscow in 2013. And his son Trump Jr told a real estate investment conference in 2008 that "Russians make up a pretty disproportionate cross-section of a lot of our assets," adding that they "see a lot of money pouring in from Russia."
More recently, the group Democratic Coalition Against Trump posted to YouTube a 2012 interview with Donald Trump Jr. that shows the candidate's son listing various Russian projects the family is interested in, including golf courses and hotels.
"I've been there many times, I've spent quite a bit of time in Moscow looking at deals," Trump Jr. said.
CNN's Stephen Collinson, Michelle Kosinksi, David Wright and Tom Kludt contributed to this report.
Read the whole story

· · · · · ·

Why the West needs to treat Russia like a pariah

1 Share
Russia’s ambassador to Washington is disappointed. Despite great potential for cooperation, Sergei Kislyak told an audience Tuesday at Johns Hopkins University that the two countries are locked in “unfriendly discussions.” Wouldn’t the world be safer and more stable if these two powers got along?
With apologies to Ambassador Kislyak, the answer to this question is no. Contrary to his protestations, Russia is not invested in protecting the world order. It is dedicated to undermining the organizations, agreements and laws that constitute it.
We all know the most egregious incidents. The Russian air force has bombed hospitals and humanitarian convoys in Syria. Its army has occupied Georgian territory for eight years. Its hackers have pilfered e-mails from leading Democrats. Its “little green men” have annexed Crimea. Just last month, a Dutch commission of inquiry concluded that the Russian government provided separatists the missiles that shot down a civilian airliner flying over Ukraine in 2014.
Russia also poisons the international system in small ways. In 2014, the former head of Australia’s anti-doping agency accused Russia of running a national program to give athletes performance-enhancing drugs. It continues to support Kirsan Ilyumzhinov as head of the International Chess Federation, despite his chummy visits to rogue states like North Korea and Iran.
His recent plan to hold the international chess championship in Iran has drawn protest from the US women’s chess champion, Nazi Paikidze-Barnes, because Iran requires women to cover their heads with a hijab.
Then there is Russia’s abuse of Interpol, the international agency for coordinating law enforcement between countries. Normal countries use Interpol to bring criminal fugitives to justice. Russia uses it to exact political retribution.
In 2013, Moscow began requesting a “red notice” to arrest William Browder, a hedge-fund manager who is seeking justice for the Russian state’s detention and murder of his former lawyer, Sergei Magnitsky.
Russia has also tried to issue red notices for other foes of Putin, such as anti-corruption advocate Nikolay Koblyakov and Vladimir Ashurkov, a political reformer associated with opposition leader Alexei Navalny.
All of this recent history discredits a lot of recent US foreign policy. Since the end of the Cold War, American presidents have promoted Russia’s integration into the international system, from the creation of the NATO-Russia council in the 1990s to Russia’s entry into the World Trade Organization in 2012.
The theory was that if you treated Russia like a responsible member of the international community, it would start acting like one. This turned out to be wrong.
November marks the 10-year anniversary of Russia’s radiation poisoning of one of its former spies, Alexander Litvinenko. Since this murder in London, Putin’s Russia has evolved into a full-blown rogue state. Now some of the original proponents of the strategy to integrate Russia into the world order say the policy didn’t work.
Michael McFaul, who served as President Obama’s ambassador to Russia and was the architect of the first-term policy to “reset” relations with Russia, told me the United States had hoped to “moderate” Russia’s negative behavior “by making them stakeholders in these international institutions.”
McFaul said he believed that in the 1990s and 2000s this was the right policy. But he said it’s time for a new approach.
Washington and its allies need a new strategy. Call it inoculation. Instead of seeking Russia’s participation in international institutions, the United States should work with its allies to protect these institutions from Russia.
For McFaul, who is today a scholar at the Hoover Institution, this means giving up for now on letting Russia back into the Group of Eight industrialized nations, and setting clear benchmarks for restarting the NATO-Russia council.
Browder last month proposed a plan for Interpol to create a two-tiered system. At a human-rights commission in Congress, he said that transparent countries like the United States would have their red-notice requests processed immediately, whereas countries like Russia, known to abuse the system, would have their requests reviewed by a panel of objective and independent experts before being sent out to member states.
Pariahs are not asked to cooperate on challenges to the global commons. With Russia, it’s the very least the United States and its allies can do to save the international system from a country that seeks to destroy it.
©2016, Bloomberg View
Read the whole story

· · ·
Next Page of Stories
Loading...
Page 3

Clinton calls women's allegations that Trump groped them 'disturbing' - Washington Post

1 Share

Washington Post



Clinton calls women's allegations that Trump groped them 'disturbing'
Washington Post
SAN FRANCISCO — Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton called the testimonials of women who say they were sexually harassed or abused by Republican Donald Trump “disturbing” on Thursday, as she lamented the negative tone of the election.
Clinton: Trump's hate so unbearable, I can only watch 'cat GIFs'New York Daily News
Clinton: 'I've watched a lot of cats do a lot of weird and interesting things'Politico
Clinton: Trump campaign makes her want to 'look at cat GIFs'USA TODAY
ABC News -Business Insider -TechCrunch
all 17 news articles »

Israeli President Hosts Quiet Meeting of Muslim and Jewish Leaders 

1 Share
President Reuven Rivlin of Israel, left, with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Thursday at a memorial ceremony for soldiers killed during the 1973 Arab-Israeli war.

Israeli leaders condemn U.N. resolution on Jerusalem holy site

1 Share
UNESCO is set to approve a document that fails to mention the Temple Mount, which is holy to Jews.





Read the whole story

· · ·

Montenegro PM accuses Russia of financing anti-NATO campaign

1 Share
PODGORICA (Reuters) - Russia is pouring money into Montenegro's election campaign in an attempt to derail the country's progress towards joining NATO, the country's Prime Minister Milo Djukanovic said on Thursday, three days ahead of an election.
  

Gourmet ganja? Marijuana dining is growing up, slowly

1 Share
LYONS, Colo. (AP) -- How to set a tone of woodsy chic at a four-course candlelight dinner served under the stars in the Colorado foothills:...

Donald Trump's moment of reckoning

1 Share
Presidential campaigns always fear the October surprise. In Trump's case it was a pattern of demeaning behavior toward women that took on new significance after a weekend bracketed by two explosive reports.
CNN has not yet independently confirmed either The New York Times or People Magazine accounts. The Trump campaign described the entire Times article as a "fiction" that amounted to "character assassination." A Trump attorney also issued an open letter to The Times demanding an immediate retraction and apology. The Trump campaign told People magazine: "This never happened. There is no merit or veracity to this fabricated story."
Trump aggressively defended himself during a rally Thursday, saying they were "pure fiction," "outright lies" and promised to provide evidence to prove they were false.
"These claims are all fabricated. They're pure fiction and outright lies. These events never, ever happened," Trump said in West Palm Beach, Florida.
But at a time when voters are already casting their ballots and Trump's path to 270 electoral votes has dramatically narrowed, the campaign is engulfed in a swirl of allegations about Trump's conduct toward women that has crippled its ability to sway undecided voters.
Trump's assertion to CNN's Anderson Cooper in Sunday night's debate that his boasts on the "Access Hollywood" tape about grabbing women were "just words" -- seemed to inflame controversy.
Several women said his denial of those kinds of actions infuriated them and prompted them to come forward. As the floodgates opened on the conduct of a powerful and litigious figure, several beauty pageant contestants said they felt emboldened to describe Trump's leering, lewd behavior when he owned the Miss USA pageant. Tasha Dixon, a 2001 contestant, told a Los Angeles TV station, Trump entered rooms where "some were topless ... some were naked" as he allegedly inspected and appraised as the owner of the pageant
Trump appears on the set of "The Celebrity Apprentice" with two of his children -- Donald Trump Jr. and Ivanka Trump -- in 2009.
Trump appears on the set of "The Celebrity Apprentice" with two of his children -- Donald Trump Jr. and Ivanka Trump -- in 2009.
Trump poses with Miss Universe contestants in 2011. Trump has been executive producer of the Miss Universe, Miss USA and Miss Teen USA pageants since 1996.
Trump poses with Miss Universe contestants in 2011. Trump has been executive producer of the Miss Universe, Miss USA and Miss Teen USA pageants since 1996.
In 2012, Trump announces his endorsement of Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney.
In 2012, Trump announces his endorsement of Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney.
Trump speaks in Sarasota, Florida, after accepting the Statesman of the Year Award at the Sarasota GOP dinner in August 2012, shortly before the Republican National Convention in nearby Tampa.
Trump speaks in Sarasota, Florida, after accepting the Statesman of the Year Award at the Sarasota GOP dinner in August 2012, shortly before the Republican National Convention in nearby Tampa.
Trump appears on stage with Nick Jonas and Giuliana Rancic during the 2013 Miss USA pageant.
Trump appears on stage with Nick Jonas and Giuliana Rancic during the 2013 Miss USA pageant.
In June 2015, <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2015/06/16/politics/donald-trump-2016-announcement-elections/" target="_blank">Trump announces that he is running for President</a> during a speech from Trump Tower in New York. <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2015/06/28/politics/donald-trump-the-apprentice-presidential-campaign/" target="_blank">He said he will give up the show</a> "The Apprentice" to run.
Trump -- flanked by U.S. Sens. Marco Rubio, left, and Ted Cruz -- speaks during a CNN debate in Miami on March 10. Trump dominated the GOP primaries and emerged as the presumptive nominee in May.
Trump -- flanked by U.S. Sens. Marco Rubio, left, and Ted Cruz -- speaks during a CNN debate in Miami on March 10. Trump dominated the GOP primaries and emerged as the presumptive nominee in May.
The Trump family poses for a photo in New York in April.
The Trump family poses for a photo in New York in April.
Trump speaks during a campaign event in Evansville, Indiana, on April 28. After Trump won the Indiana primary, his last two competitors dropped out of the GOP race.
Trump speaks during a campaign event in Evansville, Indiana, on April 28. After Trump won the Indiana primary, his last two competitors dropped out of the GOP race.
Trump delivers a speech at the Republican National Convention in July, accepting the party's nomination for President. "I have had a truly great life in business," he said. "But now, my sole and exclusive mission is to go to work for our country -- to go to work for you. It's time to deliver a victory for the American people."
Trump delivers a speech at the Republican National Convention in July, accepting the party's nomination for President. "I have had a truly great life in business," he said. "But now, my sole and exclusive mission is to go to work for our country -- to go to work for you. It's time to deliver a victory for the American people."
Trump faces Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton in <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2016/09/26/politics/gallery/first-presidential-debate/index.html" target="_blank">the first presidential debate, </a>which took place in Hempstead, New York, in September.
Trump apologizes in a video, posted to his Twitter account in October, for vulgar and sexually aggressive remarks he made a decade ago regarding women. "I said it, I was wrong and I apologize," <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2016/10/07/politics/donald-trump-women-vulgar/index.html" target="_blank">Trump said,</a> referring to lewd comments he made during a previously unaired taping of "Access Hollywood." Multiple Republican leaders rescinded their endorsements of Trump after the footage was released.
Trump apologizes in a video, posted to his Twitter account in October, for vulgar and sexually aggressive remarks he made a decade ago regarding women. "I said it, I was wrong and I apologize,"Trump said, referring to lewd comments he made during a previously unaired taping of "Access Hollywood." Multiple Republican leaders rescinded their endorsements of Trump after the footage was released.
Donald Trump, the Republican Party's presidential nominee, has been in the spotlight for years. From developing real estate to producing and starring in TV shows, see how he's shaped his empire.
Donald Trump, the Republican Party's presidential nominee, has been in the spotlight for years. From developing real estate to producing and starring in TV shows, see how he's shaped his empire.
Trump stands with Alfred Eisenpreis, New York's economic development administrator, in 1976 while they look at a sketch of a new 1,400-room renovation project of the Commodore Hotel. After graduating from the University of Pennsylvania in 1968, Trump worked with his father on developments in Queens and Brooklyn before purchasing or building multiple properties in New York and Atlantic City, New Jersey. Those properties included Trump Tower in New York and Trump Plaza and multiple casinos in Atlantic City.
Trump stands with Alfred Eisenpreis, New York's economic development administrator, in 1976 while they look at a sketch of a new 1,400-room renovation project of the Commodore Hotel. After graduating from the University of Pennsylvania in 1968, Trump worked with his father on developments in Queens and Brooklyn before purchasing or building multiple properties in New York and Atlantic City, New Jersey. Those properties included Trump Tower in New York and Trump Plaza and multiple casinos in Atlantic City.
Trump was married to Ivana Zelnicek Trump from 1977 to 1990, when they divorced. They had three children together.
Trump was married to Ivana Zelnicek Trump from 1977 to 1990, when they divorced. They had three children together.
Trump signs his second book, "Trump: Surviving at the Top," in 1990. Trump <a href="http://www.trump.com/publications/" target="_blank">has published</a> at least 16 other books, including "The Art of the Deal" and "The America We Deserve."
Trump signs his second book, "Trump: Surviving at the Top," in 1990. Trump has published at least 16 other books, including "The Art of the Deal" and "The America We Deserve."
Trump dips his second wife, Marla Maples, after the couple married in a private ceremony in New York in December 1993. The couple divorced in 1999.
Trump dips his second wife, Marla Maples, after the couple married in a private ceremony in New York in December 1993. The couple divorced in 1999.
An advertisement for the television show "The Apprentice" hangs at Trump Towers in New York in 2004. The show launched in January of that year. In January 2008, the show returned as "Celebrity Apprentice."
An advertisement for the television show "The Apprentice" hangs at Trump Towers in New York in 2004. The show launched in January of that year. In January 2008, the show returned as "Celebrity Apprentice."
A 12-inch talking Trump doll is on display at a toy store in New York in September 2004.
A 12-inch talking Trump doll is on display at a toy store in New York in September 2004.
Trump attends a news conference in 2005 that announced the establishment of Trump University. From 2005 until it closed in 2010, Trump University had about 10,000 people sign up for a program that promised success in real estate. <a href="http://money.cnn.com/2016/03/08/news/trump-university-controversy-donald-trump/" target="_blank">Three separate lawsuits</a> -- two class-action suits filed in California and one filed by New York's attorney general -- have argued that the program was mired in fraud and deception. Trump's camp has rejected the class-action suits' claims as "baseless." And Trump has charged that the New York case against him is politically motivated.
Trump attends a news conference in 2005 that announced the establishment of Trump University. From 2005 until it closed in 2010, Trump University had about 10,000 people sign up for a program that promised success in real estate. Three separate lawsuits -- two class-action suits filed in California and one filed by New York's attorney general -- have argued that the program was mired in fraud and deception. Trump's camp has rejected the class-action suits' claims as "baseless." And Trump has charged that the New York case against him is politically motivated.
Trump attends the U.S. Open tennis tournament with his third wife, Melania Knauss-Trump, and their son, Barron William Trump, in 2006. Trump and Knauss married in 2005. Trump has five children from three marriages.
Trump attends the U.S. Open tennis tournament with his third wife, Melania Knauss-Trump, and their son, Barron William Trump, in 2006. Trump and Knauss married in 2005. Trump has five children from three marriages.
Trump wrestles with "Stone Cold" Steve Austin at WrestleMania in 2007. Trump has close ties with the WWE and its CEO, Vince McMahon.
Trump wrestles with "Stone Cold" Steve Austin at WrestleMania in 2007. Trump has close ties with the WWE and its CEO, Vince McMahon.
For "The Apprentice," Trump was honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in January 2007.
For "The Apprentice," Trump was honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in January 2007.
Trump appears on the set of "The Celebrity Apprentice" with two of his children -- Donald Trump Jr. and Ivanka Trump -- in 2009.
Trump appears on the set of "The Celebrity Apprentice" with two of his children -- Donald Trump Jr. and Ivanka Trump -- in 2009.
Trump poses with Miss Universe contestants in 2011. Trump has been executive producer of the Miss Universe, Miss USA and Miss Teen USA pageants since 1996.
Trump poses with Miss Universe contestants in 2011. Trump has been executive producer of the Miss Universe, Miss USA and Miss Teen USA pageants since 1996.
In 2012, Trump announces his endorsement of Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney.
In 2012, Trump announces his endorsement of Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney.
Trump speaks in Sarasota, Florida, after accepting the Statesman of the Year Award at the Sarasota GOP dinner in August 2012, shortly before the Republican National Convention in nearby Tampa.
Trump speaks in Sarasota, Florida, after accepting the Statesman of the Year Award at the Sarasota GOP dinner in August 2012, shortly before the Republican National Convention in nearby Tampa.
Trump appears on stage with Nick Jonas and Giuliana Rancic during the 2013 Miss USA pageant.
Trump appears on stage with Nick Jonas and Giuliana Rancic during the 2013 Miss USA pageant.
In June 2015, <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2015/06/16/politics/donald-trump-2016-announcement-elections/" target="_blank">Trump announces that he is running for President</a> during a speech from Trump Tower in New York. <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2015/06/28/politics/donald-trump-the-apprentice-presidential-campaign/" target="_blank">He said he will give up the show</a> "The Apprentice" to run.
Trump -- flanked by U.S. Sens. Marco Rubio, left, and Ted Cruz -- speaks during a CNN debate in Miami on March 10. Trump dominated the GOP primaries and emerged as the presumptive nominee in May.
Trump -- flanked by U.S. Sens. Marco Rubio, left, and Ted Cruz -- speaks during a CNN debate in Miami on March 10. Trump dominated the GOP primaries and emerged as the presumptive nominee in May.
The Trump family poses for a photo in New York in April.
The Trump family poses for a photo in New York in April.
Trump speaks during a campaign event in Evansville, Indiana, on April 28. After Trump won the Indiana primary, his last two competitors dropped out of the GOP race.
Trump speaks during a campaign event in Evansville, Indiana, on April 28. After Trump won the Indiana primary, his last two competitors dropped out of the GOP race.
Trump delivers a speech at the Republican National Convention in July, accepting the party's nomination for President. "I have had a truly great life in business," he said. "But now, my sole and exclusive mission is to go to work for our country -- to go to work for you. It's time to deliver a victory for the American people."
Trump delivers a speech at the Republican National Convention in July, accepting the party's nomination for President. "I have had a truly great life in business," he said. "But now, my sole and exclusive mission is to go to work for our country -- to go to work for you. It's time to deliver a victory for the American people."
Trump faces Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton in <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2016/09/26/politics/gallery/first-presidential-debate/index.html" target="_blank">the first presidential debate, </a>which took place in Hempstead, New York, in September.
Trump apologizes in a video, posted to his Twitter account in October, for vulgar and sexually aggressive remarks he made a decade ago regarding women. "I said it, I was wrong and I apologize," <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2016/10/07/politics/donald-trump-women-vulgar/index.html" target="_blank">Trump said,</a> referring to lewd comments he made during a previously unaired taping of "Access Hollywood." Multiple Republican leaders rescinded their endorsements of Trump after the footage was released.
Trump apologizes in a video, posted to his Twitter account in October, for vulgar and sexually aggressive remarks he made a decade ago regarding women. "I said it, I was wrong and I apologize,"Trump said, referring to lewd comments he made during a previously unaired taping of "Access Hollywood." Multiple Republican leaders rescinded their endorsements of Trump after the footage was released.
Donald Trump, the Republican Party's presidential nominee, has been in the spotlight for years. From developing real estate to producing and starring in TV shows, see how he's shaped his empire.
Donald Trump, the Republican Party's presidential nominee, has been in the spotlight for years. From developing real estate to producing and starring in TV shows, see how he's shaped his empire.
Trump stands with Alfred Eisenpreis, New York's economic development administrator, in 1976 while they look at a sketch of a new 1,400-room renovation project of the Commodore Hotel. After graduating from the University of Pennsylvania in 1968, Trump worked with his father on developments in Queens and Brooklyn before purchasing or building multiple properties in New York and Atlantic City, New Jersey. Those properties included Trump Tower in New York and Trump Plaza and multiple casinos in Atlantic City.
Trump stands with Alfred Eisenpreis, New York's economic development administrator, in 1976 while they look at a sketch of a new 1,400-room renovation project of the Commodore Hotel. After graduating from the University of Pennsylvania in 1968, Trump worked with his father on developments in Queens and Brooklyn before purchasing or building multiple properties in New York and Atlantic City, New Jersey. Those properties included Trump Tower in New York and Trump Plaza and multiple casinos in Atlantic City.
Trump was married to Ivana Zelnicek Trump from 1977 to 1990, when they divorced. They had three children together.
Trump was married to Ivana Zelnicek Trump from 1977 to 1990, when they divorced. They had three children together.
Trump signs his second book, "Trump: Surviving at the Top," in 1990. Trump <a href="http://www.trump.com/publications/" target="_blank">has published</a> at least 16 other books, including "The Art of the Deal" and "The America We Deserve."
Trump signs his second book, "Trump: Surviving at the Top," in 1990. Trump has published at least 16 other books, including "The Art of the Deal" and "The America We Deserve."
Trump dips his second wife, Marla Maples, after the couple married in a private ceremony in New York in December 1993. The couple divorced in 1999.
Trump dips his second wife, Marla Maples, after the couple married in a private ceremony in New York in December 1993. The couple divorced in 1999.
An advertisement for the television show "The Apprentice" hangs at Trump Towers in New York in 2004. The show launched in January of that year. In January 2008, the show returned as "Celebrity Apprentice."
An advertisement for the television show "The Apprentice" hangs at Trump Towers in New York in 2004. The show launched in January of that year. In January 2008, the show returned as "Celebrity Apprentice."
A 12-inch talking Trump doll is on display at a toy store in New York in September 2004.
A 12-inch talking Trump doll is on display at a toy store in New York in September 2004.
Trump attends a news conference in 2005 that announced the establishment of Trump University. From 2005 until it closed in 2010, Trump University had about 10,000 people sign up for a program that promised success in real estate. <a href="http://money.cnn.com/2016/03/08/news/trump-university-controversy-donald-trump/" target="_blank">Three separate lawsuits</a> -- two class-action suits filed in California and one filed by New York's attorney general -- have argued that the program was mired in fraud and deception. Trump's camp has rejected the class-action suits' claims as "baseless." And Trump has charged that the New York case against him is politically motivated.
Trump attends a news conference in 2005 that announced the establishment of Trump University. From 2005 until it closed in 2010, Trump University had about 10,000 people sign up for a program that promised success in real estate. Three separate lawsuits -- two class-action suits filed in California and one filed by New York's attorney general -- have argued that the program was mired in fraud and deception. Trump's camp has rejected the class-action suits' claims as "baseless." And Trump has charged that the New York case against him is politically motivated.
Trump attends the U.S. Open tennis tournament with his third wife, Melania Knauss-Trump, and their son, Barron William Trump, in 2006. Trump and Knauss married in 2005. Trump has five children from three marriages.
Trump attends the U.S. Open tennis tournament with his third wife, Melania Knauss-Trump, and their son, Barron William Trump, in 2006. Trump and Knauss married in 2005. Trump has five children from three marriages.
Trump wrestles with "Stone Cold" Steve Austin at WrestleMania in 2007. Trump has close ties with the WWE and its CEO, Vince McMahon.
Trump wrestles with "Stone Cold" Steve Austin at WrestleMania in 2007. Trump has close ties with the WWE and its CEO, Vince McMahon.
For "The Apprentice," Trump was honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in January 2007.
For "The Apprentice," Trump was honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in January 2007.
Trump appears on the set of "The Celebrity Apprentice" with two of his children -- Donald Trump Jr. and Ivanka Trump -- in 2009.
Trump appears on the set of "The Celebrity Apprentice" with two of his children -- Donald Trump Jr. and Ivanka Trump -- in 2009.
Trump has retained his core support despite hits on his credibility. But this time the questions is whether his loyal backers will believe that the wave of allegations are a calculated attempt by his enemies to destroy his campaign in the final weeks.
The problem he faces is that the conduct described by several women aligns exactly with the kind of behavior he bragged about in his own voice to "Access Hollywood" host Billy Bush in 2005.
A trio of state polls released this week -- taken after the 2005 recording was published -- 
show Clinton's northern "blue wall" holding,
 as she carries commanding leads across a series of key states: She leads Trump by 9 points in Pennsylvania, 11 points in Michigan and 7 points in Wisconsin.
Additionally, a Republican National Committee source told CNN's Sara Murray Thursday that the Trump campaign decided to pull resources from the swing state of Virginia, essentially conceding the state to Clinton.
CNN/ORC poll, September 28 – October 2, 2016, sampling error: +/- 3 percentage points, sample: 1,213 likely voters
"We remain absolutely committed to winning in Virginia. While we're reallocating some of our staff strategically to accommodate early voting in nearby priority states such as North Carolina, our campaign leadership and staffing remains strong in Virginia," said John Ullyot, a Trump spokesman, in response to the reports the campaign was pulling out of Virginia.
Trump is now in the foxhole, lashing out at Republican lawmakers like House Speaker Paul Ryan, who refuse to defend him, questioning the credibility of his accusers, and excoriating what he views as a biased press corps that he believes is aiding Hillary Clinton.
"You're a disgusting human being," Trump reportedly told New York Times reporter Megan Twohey when she asked him about the allegations that he touched women inappropriately before publishing the story. "None of this ever took place," he told the newspaper.
The Trump campaign's strategy as each accusation surfaced has been to shift the conversation back to the allegations of sexual misconduct by Bill Clinton (who is not on the ballot), and his charge that Hillary Clinton served as an enabler who tried to damage the credibility of women he was involved with. His stunt of trotting out several of Bill Clinton's accusers at the debate made many Republicans cringe.
Throughout this campaign, Trump has laid out a clear, populist message and set of goals. Nearly any voter, on the other hand, will tell you they aren't sure what Clinton's core message is or what her agenda would be in the White House.
But in these final weeks, when Trump should be making his closing argument, the deluge of scandals surrounding his campaign have swallowed his message. As the polls make clear, Clinton has benefited -- that effect has elevated her flawed candidacy to something close to a sure bet.
"You know, if I were running against any Republican, I would be working hard and I would be asking for your help," Clinton said at a campaign event Thursday. "But this is an election between two very different visions, views, and sets of values. And that's why the stakes are so high, because we know, we've already learned who Donald Trump is, what we have to prove in this election is who we are, and what we stand for, and what we believe in."
Losing campaigns often try to pinpoint the definitive moment when they knew the race was over.
For John McCain, it was the day the markets collapsed and he insisted the fundamentals of the economy were strong. For Mitt Romney, it was the emergence of a taped fundraiser speech where he said 47% of American voters would never vote for him because they are dependent on government.
Donald Trump
to be the next US President

Will the odds go up or down?
It will not be quite as simple to pinpoint one single moment for Trump if he loses on Election Day, because his polls numbers have been sliding ever since his defensive and unpolished performance in the first debate.
"For many voters still struggling with how to vote, all the bad news about Trump -- combined with the questionable things he has personally said over the last 16 months -- have finally created a tipping point that many thought would have come much earlier," said Republican strategist Mike DuHaime, who has advised New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former president George W. Bush.
DuHaime called the Trump campaign's decision to attack Bill Clinton as their response "ludicrous and amateurish," an illustration that "they only understand how to talk to the people already voting for Trump."
"With all of the places where Republicans could legitimately question Hillary Clinton's policy choices" such as her approach to Russia, Syria, tax policy and her US Senate votes, as well as "her overall judgment" in creating her own private email server and the questionable fundraising practices of Clinton Global Initiative, "our nominee has decided to attack her husband instead," he said.
"Maybe it feels good for them to vent 20 years of anti-Bill frustrations but it doesn't help Trump and likely helps Secretary Clinton," he said.
Read the whole story

· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·
Next Page of Stories
Loading...
Page 4

Trump apologizes for Serbian bombing, aligns himself with Russian position

1 Share
Donald Trump speaks Oct. 12, 2016, in Lakeland, Fla. (Photo: Joe Raedle, Getty Images)
has apologized to Serbia for the 1999 bombing campaign when was president, a move that puts him in line with Russian rhetoric used to rally Serbians against the United States.
"The bombing of Serbs, who were our allies in both world wars, was a big mistake,” Trump told the Serbian weekly magazine Nedeljnik, the story was reported in English by Newsweek. “Serbians are very good people. Unfortunately, the caused them a lot of harm, but also throughout the , which they made a mess out of."
Trump promised to adopt “a new policy with the Balkans” if he becomes president.
The interview was conducted via email through a Trump adviser.
While the decision to bomb Serbia — in 1995 and 1999 — did have civilian casualties, it stopped Serbian militias from ethnic cleansing against people in the former Yugoslavia, including Muslims and Croatians.
, the Serbian leader responsible for atrocities in the former Yugoslav republic of , was arrested and tried for war crimes in The Netherlands. He died in prison in 2006.
Trump’s apology to another country contradicts what he has criticized of doing.
Earlier this summer — following the president’s trip to Asia which included a trip to — Trump criticized Obama for an “apology tour” that led to the Islamic State.
“We’ve tried it President Obama’s way, doesn’t work. He gave the world his apology tour. We got ISIS and many other problems in return. That’s what we got. Remember the famous apology tour? ‘We’re sorry for everything,’” Trump said in New Hampshire.
Obama never went on an "apology tour," as Trump and other critics have claimed.
Thursday's story comes as accusations that Russia is attempting to rig the election for Trump. There have been a series of hacks of Democrats including transcripts of Hillary Clinton’s paid speeches, members of the Democratic National Committee and most recently Clinton’s campaign chairman John Podesta.
"I’ve been involved in politics for nearly five decades. And this definitely is the first campaign that I’ve been involved with in which I’ve had to tangle with Russian Intelligence agencies," Podesta told reporters on board Clinton's campaign plane. Podesta added that Russia "seem[s] to be doing everything they can on behalf of our opponent."
Read or Share this story: <a href="http://usat.ly/2eaSWfm" rel="nofollow">http://usat.ly/2eaSWfm</a>
Read the whole story

· ·

FBI and CIA Politicized by Comey, Brennan

1 Share
FBI Director James Comey's abject submission to the powers that be likely destroyed the final pillar in traditional America, where we were Americans first, and political partisans second.
Sadly, the FBI's political whitewash of Hillary Clinton's apparent crimes illustrates the bureau's descent into the same politicization of the CIA under John Brennan and Obama.
From its first days, the Obama administration has poisoned the well of American interests in favor of its own political interests. Since Obama unveiled John Brennan as his preferred intelligence expert during the 2008 presidential campaign, non-partisan American interests have been sacrificed for the interests of Politically Correct Progressivism.
Brennan, the first director of the National Counterterrorism Center (NCTC) from 2004-2005, was rewarded with the counterterrorism czar throne, Homeland Security Advisor, after being rejected as the Director of the CIA in early 2009. After his appointment, Brennan came to effectively rule the intelligence community from his office in the White House.
The 2009 underwear bomber case provided clear evidence of Brennan's absolute power over the wider intelligence community, as well as how he politicized it. A Nigerian terrorist, already in Brennan’s databases, boarded a plane bound for Chicago. His underwear was full of bomb material. In U.S. airspace the terrorist attempted to light the bomb. The plot was only foiled because the Nigerian hadworn the shorts for two weeks.
Even though Brennan had sold the "connect-the-dots" analytical software to the center after he left government employment in 2005, Obama appointed Brennan-the-czar to lead the investigation into the reasons that NCTC failed to connect the dots in the underwear case. In short, after Brennan conducted an investigation into Brennan’s agency’s use of Brennan’s company’s counterterrorism software, Brennan announced that he would take care of the issues. Pretty sweet work, if you can get it!
As Obama and Brennan's vision for iron-fisted rule of the intelligence community was further developed, the czar cooperated with a political witch-hunt, led by the attorney general, to punish CIA officers for their roles in harsh interrogation carried out during the Bush administration. Even though Brennan was the Deputy Director of the CIA during the Bush administration's use of harsh interrogation, he sat next to Obama as the administration pushed for prosecutions of CIA officers.
Later, when Congress conducted an investigation into the internal machinations at the CIA, the CIA dipped into the congressional investigators' computers.
Brennan, quietly, and behind the scenes, appeared to be the evil genius behind Obama and then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s unprecedented meddling, including the destruction of America's stable partner in counterterrorism in North Africa, Libya’s Muammar Gaddafi.
Comey’s brazen and public refusal to do his Constitutional duty and Brennan’s quiet politicization of the intelligence community are unprecedented in modern history.
The result has been an eight-year purge of the intelligence community — with any political dissenters either banished or silenced. A reign of quiet terror now blankets the IC. Dissent means losing jobs, retirements, and perks. Go-along-to-get-along is now standard operating practice.
Kent Clizbe is a former CIA ops officer, and expert in counter-terrorism and Islamic extremism, credibility assessment, and fraud detection. He is an historian of anti-American espionage operations, and author of "Willing Accomplices: How KGB Covert Influence Ops Created Political Correctness." Read more of his reports — Go Here Now.
© 2016 Newsmax. All rights reserved.
Read the whole story

· ·

Two Boston Police Officers Wounded, Suspect Dead in Shooting 

1 Share
(Reuters)–TwoBoston policemen were in critical condition early on Thursday after they were shot in a gunfight with a man who was shot dead by other police officers, police said.
Other officers responding to the incident on the city’s East Side
shot and killed the man who was armed with an assault rifle and wearing a ballistic vest, Police Department Commissioner William Evans told a news conference.
“Domestic calls are probably the most volatile. You never really know what you are walking into,” he said.
The shooting took place inside a house
in the Orient Heights neighborhood at about 11 p.m. local time, theBoston Police Department tweeted.
One of the officers was shot
several times and the other officer was shot once or
twice. Both were in “extremely critical” condition at a local hospital, Evans said.
Nine other officers, who had dragged their wounded colleagues out of the house, were being treated for minor injuries and trauma at another hospital, he said.
Police did not identify the gunman or the wounded officers, one of whom had been with the police department for about 28 years and the other for about 12 years, police said.
(Reporting by Brendan O’Brien in Milwaukee; Editing by
Louise Ireland)

The Early Edition: October 13, 2016 

-