Saturday, August 1, 2015

Desert Storm, the Last Classic War Friday July 31st, 2015 at 8:09 PM

Desert Storm, the Last Classic War

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The Saturday Essay: Twenty-five years after Iraq invaded Kuwait, the Gulf War still stands out as a triumph of U.S. foreign policy. Its lessons remain urgent, even in the chaos of today’s much altered Middle East.

FAA to investigate drone sighting near JFK airport

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Delta flight reported seeing an unmanned aircraft while on approach to John F Kennedy International Airport in New York

Putin Would Eat President Trump for Lunch - Bloomberg View

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Bloomberg View

Putin Would Eat President Trump for Lunch
Bloomberg View
Perhaps as a result of this imaginary rapport between the billionaire and the ex-spy, American writers are tempted to compare Trump with Putin. "Doesn't Trump resemble an American Putin?" Jack Shafer wrote in Politico this week. "The two share nativist ...
Donald Trump: "I'd get along very well with Vladimir Putin"CBS News
Trump Says He Would 'Get Along Very Well' With PutinNBCNews.com
Donald Trump: I'd get on 'very well' with Putin if I were presidentTelegraph.co.uk
The Independent -International Business Times -Mirror.co.uk
all 1,057 news articles »
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Page 9

Fired Mexican Soccer Coach Probed for Political Tweets

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Fired Mexican soccer coach under investigation for political tweets

VIDEO: More people 'disappearing' in Egypt

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There has been a rise in the number of people gong missing at the hand of the security services in Egypt, according to human rights activists in the country.

U.S. Defense Official: ‘No Meaningful Degradation’ In Islamic State Force From Obama Bomb Campaign 

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The CIA and other U.S. intelligence agencies have concluded that the Obama administration bomb campaign launched last year against the Islamic State has yielded no perceivable degradation of the terrorist organization’s forces.
The Associated Press reported:
The military campaign has prevented Iraq’s collapse and put the Islamic State under increasing pressure in northern Syria, particularly squeezing its self-proclaimed capital in Raqqa. But intelligence analysts see the overall situation as a strategic stalemate: The Islamic State remains a well-funded extremist army able to replenish its ranks with foreign jihadis as quickly as the U.S. can eliminate them. Meanwhile, the group has expanded to other countries, including Libya, Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula and Afghanistan.
An unnamed defense official, who was not authorized to speak publicly on the matter, admitted that U.S. intelligence has “seen no meaningful degradation in their numbers.”
U.S. intelligence officials estimate that the Islamic State (IS, also known as ISIL or ISIS) remains between 20,000 and 30,000 fighters strong.
Nevertheless, President Obama spoke earlier this month on the “progress” the United States has witnessed after hitting IS in Iraq and Syria with thousands of air strikes.
John Allen, the retired Marine general tasked with developing the campaign against IS, said, “ISIS is losing” at the Aspen Security Forum in Colorado last week. At the same event, FBI director James Comey called IS a “the threat that we’re worrying about in the homeland most of all.”
The Obama administration strategy to thwart IS involves bombing militants and training Syrian and Kurdish fighters on the ground. It bars U.S. troops from engaging in combat with the Islamic State or launching air strikes from the ground.
Only 60 Syrian insurgents have received appropriate training and been vetted by the United States to fight the Islamic State. Still, the U.S. is planning to rely on Syrian rebels–many of whom have connections to Islamic militant groups and are more concerned with toppling Bashar al-Assad’s regime–to secure an IS “safe zone” along the Syrian-Turkish border.
Despite the U.S. campaign, the Islamic State has exhibited signs of transforming into a functional state, issuing identification cards and dispersing fishing guidelines in the areas of Syria and Iraq that it controls.
John E. McLaughlin, who served as deputy director of the CIA between 2000 and 2004 during portions of the Bill Clinton and George W. Bush administrations, recently admitted that the idea of IS eventually becoming a legitimate state with working airports and passports is “not inconceivable.”
The Islamic State is also accumulating plenty of money. According to one estimate, IS nets $500 million in annual revenue from oil sales in addition to the $1 billion the terrorist group lifts from banks in areas it controls.
Obama has insisted in July that there are “no current plans” to send more U.S. troops overseas to fight IS.
Read the whole story
 
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US Fears Data Stolen by Chinese Hacker Could Identify Spies - New York Times

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US
Fears Data Stolen by Chinese Hacker Could Identify Spies
New York Times
Last month the director of national intelligence, James RClapper Jr., said, “You've got to salute the Chinese for what they did,” before retreating to say China was the “leading suspect” in the case. One former senior C.I.A. officer and one ...
US fears data stolen by Chinese hackers could identify spies Times of India

all 22 news articles »

New York Times

F.B.I. Emphasizes Speed as ISIS Exhorts Individuals to Attack - The New York Times - New York Times

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New York Times

F.B.I. Emphasizes Speed as ISIS Exhorts Individuals to Attack - The New York Times
New York Times
“Sometimes people say, 'So why are you disrupting these people?' ” said James BComey, the F.B.I. director, in a briefing with reporters. “Well, first, we're disrupting because we try to disrupt plots, but also we face people who are highly ...

and more »

Taliban Confirms Death of Mullah Omar 

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By William Tucker
Chief Correspondent for In Homeland Security
The Afghan Taliban has confirmed that their leader Mullah Omar, the Leader of the Faithful, has died.
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Page 10

Long Term Causes Of The Greek Economic Crisis

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By John D. Theodore
Faculty Member, Economics at American Public University
The Greek economic crisis is making headlines today, but the country’s economic problem started several decades ago and has a number of precipitants.

Russia's New S-300M Drone: The Ultimate Reconnaissance Tool

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Several new advanced drones will soon enter service with the Russian armed forces with the state-of-the-art S300M UAV slated for mass production already next month, Russian media reported.

Iraq, Russia Sign Military-Technical Cooperation Agreement

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Iraqi Defense Minister Khaled Obaidi and Director of the Russian Federal Service for Military-Technical Cooperation Alexander Fomin signed an agreement on military-technical cooperation, Iraqi Defense Ministry said.

In ISIL-controlled territory, 8 million civilians living in 'state of fear' - UN expert

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The Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) has engaged in widespread and systematic human rights violations of the most serious kinds in Syria and Iraq, brutally forcing some 8 million people to "assimilate, flee or face death," according to a United Nations expert.

Turkey Disappointed by Negative Iraqi Stance on Airstrikes on PKK Positions

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Ankara is disappointed by Baghdad's reaction to the Turkish airstrikes against Kurds on the Iraqi territory.

Turkey Supports ISIS. … Now Declares “War Against ISIS”, But Instead Bombs Its Political Rival, Which Is the Most Effective Force Fighting ISIS 

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NATO member Turkey has been busted supporting ISIS. The Guardian reported this week: US special forces raided the compound of an Islamic State leader in eastern Syria in May, they made sure not to tell the neighbours. The target of…
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Page 11

China's Naked Emperors - New York Times

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TheStreet.com

China's Naked Emperors
New York Times 
Politicians who preside over economic booms often develop delusions of competence. You can see this domestically: Jeb Bush imagines that he knows the secrets of economic growth because he happened to be governor when Florida was experiencing a 
 ...

6 U.S. Stocks That a China Crash Could ThreatenTheStreet.com 
Paul Krugman: China's Leaders Have No Idea What They Are DoingAlterNet
As China's era of superfast growth ends, its rulers have no idea what they're ...Economic Times

all 9 news articles »

Moscow Paves the Way to Replace Dagestani Leader

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Dagestan has not seen potentially destabilizing arrests of top officials since the arrest of the mayor of Makhachkala on June 1, 2013 (RIA Novosti, June 1, 2013). That is why the news about a police search of the home of one of the most influential leaders of the new Avar political elite, Sagid Murtazaliev, made top headlines in the republic.
The story began to unfold in the city of Kizlyar at 3 a.m., on July 27. Without first imposing a counterterrorism operation regime, police special forces along with the Federal Security Service (FSB) surrounded the home of the head of Dagestan’s Kizlyar district, Andrei Vinogradov (Onkavkaz.com, July 27). Vinogradov is interesting because he was Sagid Murtazaliev’s personal driver prior to becoming head of the district. The authorities suspected Vinogradov of involvement in the murder of four people (Rrnews.ru, July 27), but Murtazaliev helped secure his release. Clearly, Murtazaliev needed such a person to keep the district under his control. Kizlyar district has attracted the interest of powerful groups in Dagestan because it hosts a large railway hub and multiple brickyards, while the poaching of black caviar and sturgeon is also quite developed in the area.
The authorities flew Vinogradov to the Russian military base in the city of Mozdok, North Ossetia, by helicopter, just as they did with the mayor of Makhachkala in 2013. As the authorities tried to arrest Vinogradov, he and his guards tried to resist, hoping that Murtazaliev would arrive to rescue them. Vinogradov could not have known that Sagid Murtazaliev’s property in the town of Krivaya Balka in Makhachkala’s suburbs was also under siege at that moment. Russian special forces from the Mozdok military base were dispatched to arrest the head of Kizlyar district and Murtazaliev. The Russian forces traveled from Mozdok to Dagestan via Chechnya that night, which alarmed local authorities, who did not know where the Russian forces were headed. Only after the Russian special forces crossed Chechnya from west to east and continued on to Dagestan did the Chechens breathe a sigh of relief.
At the time that Sagid Murtazaliev’s home in the suburbs of Makhachkala was sealed off by FSB and Ministry of Interior forces, he was the head of the Dagestani branch of the Russian Pension Fund. At the start of 2015, some observers regarded him as one of the primary contenders for the position of Makhachkala mayor (Onkavkaz.com, July 27).
Murtazaliev’s ambitions to become mayor of Dagestan’s capital, whose population is steadily approaching one million, may have prompted the authorities’ action against him. Murtazaliev was an Olympic, world and European wrestling champion, but was better known as one of the most influential political figures in contemporary Dagestan. While head of the Kizlyar district, he essentially refused to subordinate himself to Magomedsalam Magomedov, Dagestan’s president from 2010 to 2013. Moreover, since Kizlyar district borders Chechnya’s Shelkovskoi district, Murtazaliev developed friendly relations with Chechen leader Ramzan Kadyrov. This friendship prompted some analysts to suggest that Murtazaliev’s arrest was aimed at Kadyrov, but this appears to be an overly exaggerated and complicated explanation (Eadaily.com, July 27).
Given the fact that Murtazaliev, an Avar, counterbalanced the powerful Dargin clan in the capital of Dagestan, it is unlikely that Ramazan Abdulatipov, the governor of Dagestan who is also an Avar, was behind the moves against him. The removal of Murtazaliev from the political scene only weakens in relation to the non-Avar clans in the republic.
It is unclear how the authorities, when planning this large-scale special operation by the FSB and the Investigative Committee, could have missed the fact that Murtazaliev was outside Russia. Murtazaliev was mostly likely in the United Arab Emirates at the time of the operation. It appears that the authorities deliberately carried out the special operation against Murtazaliev’s interests while he was out of the country in order to avoid an open clash with him and his supporters in Dagestan. Kizlyar district head Vinogradov was arrested soon after he returned to Dagestan from the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Apparently, Vinogradov returned to assess the situation for the possible return of Murtazaliev himself (Kavpolit.com, July 27). The police in Makhachkala were on high alert because Russian Interior Minister Vladimir Kolokoltsev was in the Dagestani capital for meetings with the Interior Ministry’s Directorate in the North Caucasian Federal District.
It is interesting that Murtazaliev is practically the main witness for the prosecution in the case against former Makhachkala mayor Said Amirov (Bigcaucasus.com July 28). Since Murtazaliev is abroad, the Russian court will view his testimony against Amirov in a different light, and this may even result in Amirov’s acquittal, which will be a most unpleasant surprise for Dagestani Governor Abdulatipov.
The same day the authorities arrested Kizlyar district chief Vinogradov and searched Murtazaliev’s properties, both were charged with homicide and financing terrorism (Lifenews.ru, July 28). Even if the case against them does not end up in court, Murtazaliev will be out of politics for a long time. That must have been the objective of those who were behind the attack on the Dagestani politician.
Someone in Moscow appears to be paving the way to replace Abdulatipov as Dagestan’s governor. His replacement will probably not be from a known clan, and the ethnic balance that existed in the republic during and after the Soviet period will likely be disregarded. While people in Moscow make decisions for the Dagestanis, this may have devastating repercussions for Dagestan’s stability.
Read the whole story
 
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WFB’s MacLean on Islamic State: ‘Go After Them in the Middle East’ 

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WFB’s MacLean on Islamic State: ‘Go After Them in the Middle East’

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Blake Seitz   Email Blake | Full Bio | RSS
Blake Seitz is a media analyst for the Washington Free Beacon. Blake graduated from the University of Georgia in 2015, where he served as opinions editor of The Red & Black and editor-in-chief of The Arch Conservative. Contact him via email at <a href="mailto:seitz@freebeacon.com">seitz@freebeacon.com</a>. Follow him on Twitter @BlakeSeitz.

Nusra Front Attacks U.S.-Backed Syrian Rebel Group

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The U.S. trained members of the group to take on the Islamic State, but on Friday they were fighting off an attack from another Islamist faction.

We're suing the Justice Department over FBI's secret rules for using National ... - Boing Boing

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Boing Boing

We're suing the Justice Department over FBI's secret rules for using National ...
Boing Boing
Reading between the redactions, it seems that Attorney General approval may be required in some circumstances but not in others. But the FBI and DOJ have kept those circumstances secret, even though we know the FBI has abused its NSL authority and ...

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Page 12

US Wage Growth Plummets to Slowest Pace On Record

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U.S. employment costs posted the smallest increase on record in the second quarter of 2015.
The Labor Department released the figures Friday, Reuters reported. The Employment Cost Index, the general measure of labor costs that is used as an accurate indication of labor market slack, ticked up only 0.2 percent in the second quarter.
Down from an 0.7 percent gain in the first quarter, this represents the smallest gain since the government started measuring the employment cost index in 1982.
Some economists had anticipated that the figure would see an 0.6 percent increase in the second quarter.
This data has periodically proved to be very lumpy and the sharp deceleration is inconsistent with other measures of wage inflation that are trending higher, not falling off a cliff,” said Eric Green, chief economist at TD Securities in New York City.
Comprising 70 percent of employment costs, wages and salaries endured their smallest gain on record, rising 0.2 percent in the second quarter after ticking up 0.7 percent in the first. In the private sector, wages and salaries recorded identical gains.
Overall private sector compensation did not rise at all, the first instance of such an occurrence. Over the last 12 months, labor costs have risen only 2.0 percent, which represents the lowest 12-month increase since last year.
Still, Federal Reserve chair Janet Yellen has indicated that the Fed may raise interest rates later this year due to improvement in the labor market. Currently, the unemployment rate sits at 5.3 percent, near the 5.0-5.2 percent range that many Federal Reserve officials deem indicative of full employment.
News of the lagging employment cost index growth comes one day after data from the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) indicated that the U.S. economy grew 2.3 percent in the second quarter of 2015, down from the 4.6 percent growth experienced in the second quarter of 2014.

Car hacking risk may be broader than Fiat Chrysler: US regulator - Reuters

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Reuters

Car hacking risk may be broader than Fiat Chrysler: US regulator
Reuters
The announcement by FCA US LLC, formerly Chrysler Group LLC, followed reports thatcybersecurity researchers had used a wireless connection to turn off a Jeep Cherokee's engine as it drove, increasing concerns about the safety of Internet-enabled ...
Car Hacking Risk Could Extend Beyond Fiat Chrysler: NTSB ChiefNBCNews.com
NHTSA: Fiat Chrysler hacking 'warning' to industryThe Detroit News
Amid recalls and hacking, FCA announces Q2 profits jump 69%MLive.com

all 369 news articles »

CIA Meddling, Race Riots, and a Phantom Death Squad - Foreign Policy

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Foreign Policy

CIA Meddling, Race Riots, and a Phantom Death Squad
Foreign Policy
CIA Meddling, Race Riots, and a Phantom Death Squad. Why a tiny South American country can't escape the ugly legacies of its idiosyncratic past. By Gaiutra BahadurJournalist Gaiutra Bahadur is the author of Coolie Woman: The Odyssey of Indenture, ...

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Taliban likely to stay course in both war and peace talks, analysts

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  • Shrapnel remained inside decorated WWII vet for rest of life

    He was among the first wave of soldiers to hit Omaha Beach on D-Day. As a medic, Marion Gray dragged a wounded soldier from the surf to dry land into a barrage of fire raining down from the Germans perched on the cliffs. Gray carried 13 pieces of shrapnel in his arm for the rest of his life. He died Tuesday at age 96.
  • Navy SEALs trek from 'Summit to Sunshine'

    A contingent of Navy SEALs arrived here Thursday morning, halfway through a grueling 95-mile trek from the summit of Mount Washington to the shores of Sebago Lake in Casco on one of the hottest days this summer. Their mission? To bring sunshine into the lives of children with life-threatening illnesses in the second annual "SEALs for Sunshine" fundraiser.
  • Navy SEALs trek from 'Summit to Sunshine'

    A contingent of Navy SEALs arrived here Thursday morning, halfway through a grueling 95-mile trek from the summit of Mount Washington to the shores of Sebago Lake in Casco on one of the hottest days this summer. Their mission? To bring sunshine into the lives of children with life-threatening illnesses in the second annual "SEALs for Sunshine" fundraiser.
  • GALLERY

    Putin mugs for the people: Army store opens in prime Moscow spot

    Perhaps in response to President Vladimir Putin's increasingly militaristic policies, The Russian Army Store opened earlier this summer in Moscow as an upmarket venue selling a wide range of patriotic goods - from mugs with Putin's portrait to limited-edition clothing like a leather jacket costing over $1,500.
  • Navy could face more cases of cancer, illness among Guantanamo Bay personnel

    As the Navy investigates reports of seven military and civilian personnel diagnosed with cancer or other illnesses after serving at Guantanamo Bay, one of detention facility’s long-time defense attorneys says there could be almost three times as many claims.
  • Tracing back debris to find Flight 370 may prove impossible

    If it's confirmed that a wing fragment found on a remote island in the Indian Ocean is from Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, lost more than 500 days ago, could scientists use their knowledge of ocean currents to trace back its path and pinpoint the bulk of the wreck?
  • Cyber defense, military medicine among aid for Iraq in new NATO plan

    NATO agreed on Friday to launch a military assistance program for Iraq involving a range of training measures to help the country as it fights Islamic State militants.
  • Experimental Ebola vaccine could stop virus in West Africa

    An experimental Ebola vaccine tested on thousands of people in Guinea seems to work and might help shut down the ongoing epidemic in West Africa, according to interim results from a study published Friday.
    • The United States will not have an aircraft carrier deployed to the Persian Gulf this fall for the first time in years, and the rare gap could hinder military capabilities in the war against the Islamic State, the Obama administration’s nominee to lead the Navy told the Senate on Thursday.
    • Lawmakers cracking down on for-profit college marketing

      Government agencies have grown wary of for-profit colleges' pursuit of veterans and their families. Military service members receive federal education funding that has become a stable source of revenue for many of the schools.

    This post has been generated by Page2RSS
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    FBI: Good Samaritans killed by man who sought roadside help - Detroit Free Press

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    Detroit Free Press

    FBI: Good Samaritans killed by man who sought roadside help
    Detroit Free Press
    HELENA, Mont. — An 18-year-old Wyoming man accused of robbing and shooting three members of a family after asking for roadside help told investigators he opened fire after one of the victims laughed at him, an FBI agent said in a court filing Thursday.

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    FBI Struggling With Cybersecurity Because of Shit Pay and Drug Tests - Gizmodo

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    Gizmodo

    FBI Struggling With Cybersecurity Because of Shit Pay and Drug Tests
    Gizmodo
    It's no secret that American businesses and the government are under constant attack from hackers around the world. That's just the nature of living in the 21st century. But a new audit says that America is even less prepared to defend against these ...
    FBI lags in filling cybersecurity jobs: auditorPhys.Org
    FBI faces several challenges with cybersecurity programWashington Times
    FBI lags in filling cybersecurity jobs over low pay and background checks: AuditorEconomic Times
    Daily Caller -Malay Mail Online
    all 38 news articles »
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    Page 13

    U.S. Defense Official: ‘No Meaningful Degradation’ In Islamic State Force From Obama Bomb Campaign 

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    The CIA and other U.S. intelligence agencies have concluded that the Obama administration bomb campaign launched last year against the Islamic State has yielded no perceivable degradation of the terrorist organization’s forces.
    The Associated Press reported:
    The military campaign has prevented Iraq’s collapse and put the Islamic State under increasing pressure in northern Syria, particularly squeezing its self-proclaimed capital in Raqqa. But intelligence analysts see the overall situation as a strategic stalemate: The Islamic State remains a well-funded extremist army able to replenish its ranks with foreign jihadis as quickly as the U.S. can eliminate them. Meanwhile, the group has expanded to other countries, including Libya, Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula and Afghanistan.
    An unnamed defense official, who was not authorized to speak publicly on the matter, admitted that U.S. intelligence has “seen no meaningful degradation in their numbers.”
    U.S. intelligence officials estimate that the Islamic State (IS, also known as ISIL or ISIS) remains between 20,000 and 30,000 fighters strong.
    Nevertheless, President Obama spoke earlier this month on the “progress” the United States has witnessed after hitting IS in Iraq and Syria with thousands of air strikes.
    John Allen, the retired Marine general tasked with developing the campaign against IS, said, “ISIS is losing” at the Aspen Security Forum in Colorado last week. At the same event, FBI director James Comey called IS a “the threat that we’re worrying about in the homeland most of all.”
    The Obama administration strategy to thwart IS involves bombing militants and training Syrian and Kurdish fighters on the ground. It bars U.S. troops from engaging in combat with the Islamic State or launching air strikes from the ground.
    Only 60 Syrian insurgents have received appropriate training and been vetted by the United States to fight the Islamic State. Still, the U.S. is planning to rely on Syrian rebels–many of whom have connections to Islamic militant groups and are more concerned with toppling Bashar al-Assad’s regime–to secure an IS “safe zone” along the Syrian-Turkish border.
    Despite the U.S. campaign, the Islamic State has exhibited signs of transforming into a functional state, issuing identification cards and dispersing fishing guidelines in the areas of Syria and Iraq that it controls.
    John E. McLaughlin, who served as deputy director of the CIA between 2000 and 2004 during portions of the Bill Clinton and George W. Bush administrations, recently admitted that the idea of IS eventually becoming a legitimate state with working airports and passports is “not inconceivable.”
    The Islamic State is also accumulating plenty of money. According to one estimate, IS nets $500 million in annual revenue from oil sales in addition to the $1 billion the terrorist group lifts from banks in areas it controls.
    Obama has insisted in July that there are “no current plans” to send more U.S. troops overseas to fight IS.
    Read the whole story
     
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    Car hacking risk may be broader than Fiat Chrysler: US regulator - Reuters

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    Reuters

    Car hacking risk may be broader than Fiat Chrysler: US regulator
    Reuters
    The announcement by FCA US LLC, formerly Chrysler Group LLC, followed reports thatcybersecurity researchers had used a wireless connection to turn off a Jeep Cherokee's engine as it drove, increasing concerns about the safety of Internet-enabled ...
    NHTSA: Fiat Chrysler hacking 'warning' to industryThe Detroit News
    Amid recalls and hacking, FCA announces Q2 profits jump 69%MLive.com
    Cybersecurity and manufacturers: what the costly Chrysler Jeep hack revealsWe Live Security (blog)
    Waterbury Republican American -KTAR.com
    all 360 news articles »

    FBI lags in filling cybersecurity jobs: auditor - Phys.Org

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    Gizmodo

    FBI lags in filling cybersecurity jobs: auditor
    Phys.Org
    The report noted the FBI is also hampered in its efforts to boost cybersecurity efforts by a lack of cooperation from the private sector. "The private sector reluctance to share information has been further affected by the distrust of government ...
    FBI Struggling With Cybersecurity Because of Shit Pay and Drug TestsGizmodo
    FBI faces several challenges with cybersecurity programWashington Times
    Feds Still Not Sharing Intel Widely Enough 14 Years After 9/11 [VIDEO]Daily Caller
    Malay Mail Online -Business Insider
    all 36 news articles »

    Russia in Review

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    July 31, 2015
    Russia in Review: a digest of useful news from U.S.-Russia Initiative to Prevent Nuclear Terrorism for July 24-31, 2015

    CIA concludes US-led fight against IS a 'strategic stalemate': Report - Middle East Eye

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    Middle East Eye

    CIA concludes US-led fight against IS a 'strategic stalemate': Report
    Middle East Eye
    While the US has spent billions of dollars on a yearlong bombing campaign and some officials have suggested that the militant group is “losing,” one official told AP that a report released on Friday from the CIA and Defence Intelligence Agency, among ...

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    Congress OKs Shifting $3 Billion To Bail Out Cash-Strapped VA

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    Without the fix, the department said it would have to close hospitals, furlough workers and issue a hiring freeze starting in August.
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    Page 14

    Navy Cruisers Should Be Stripped Of Ballistic Missile Defense, US Admiral Says - International Business Times

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    International Business Times

    Navy Cruisers Should Be Stripped Of Ballistic Missile Defense, US Admiral Says
    International Business Times
    U.S. Navy Adm. John Richardson, the nominee for chief of naval operations, said Thursday that he supported stripping naval cruisers of their missile-defense capabilities. Pictured: The USS Monterey, equipped with the Aegis air-defense system, is docked ...

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    NATO agrees on support package for Iraq - U.S. News & World Report

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    U.S. News & World Report

    NATO agrees on support package for Iraq
    U.S. News & World Report
    NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg addresses the media after a North Atlantic Council Meeting at NATO headquarters in Brussels on Tuesday July 28, 2015. For just the fifth time in its 66-year history, NATO ambassadors met in emergency session ...
    NATO agrees on support package for Iraq to strengthen security, defense sectorsMinneapolis Star Tribune

    all 84 news articles »

    Outgoing Boston FBI head says agency worked to rebuild trust - Boston Globe

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    Boston Globe

    Outgoing Boston FBI head says agency worked to rebuild trust
    Boston Globe
    The outgoing head of the FBI in Boston said Friday that law enforcement must continue to monitor national security and cyber-security threats in the region and that his agency has worked to better relations with the community. “The days of the FBI ...

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    Did Russia Win or Lose from the U.S.-Iran Deal? - Silk Road Reporters

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    Silk Road Reporters

    Did Russia Win or Lose from the U.S.-Iran Deal?
    Silk Road Reporters
    On the other hand, Moscow believed that Tehran had no choice but to stick with Moscow due to its virulent anti-Americanism, no matter how frustrating relations with the Kremlin could be. Russia played an interesting role at the negotiation table on the ...
    The Middle East They WantedArutz Sheva

    all 910 news articles »

    NATO agrees on support package for Iraq to strengthen security, defense sectors - Fox News

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    Fox News

    NATO agrees on support package for Iraq to strengthen security, defense sectors
    Fox News
    NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg addresses the media after a North Atlantic Council Meeting at NATO headquarters in Brussels on Tuesday July 28, 2015. For just the fifth time in its 66-year history, NATO ambassadors met in emergency session ...
    NATO Agrees on Support Package for IraqABC News

    all 7 news articles »

    CIA vs. Obama's 'optimistic' ISIS talk; New DIA chief speaks; After Mullah ... - Defense One

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    IBNLive

    CIA vs. Obama's 'optimistic' ISIS talk; New DIA chief speaks; After Mullah ...
    Defense One
    Multiple U.S. intelligence assessments contradict the Obama administration's “optimistic line” on ISIS and on how much the Islamic State has been degraded across Iraq and Syria, according to the Associated Press. Catch that dismal roll-up from “the CIA ...
    Taliban leader Omar's tale reflects clashing agendasWashington Post

    all 1,766 news articles »
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    Page 15

    NATO-Russia air duel intensifes as British Typhoons make record intercept - Ukraine Today

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    Ukraine Today

    NATO-Russia air duel intensifes as British Typhoons make record intercept
    Ukraine Today
    Last Friday, British Typhoon fighter jets stationed in Estonia were scrambled, after NATO air defences picked up a squadron of 10 Russian aircraft approaching Baltic airspace across the gulf of Finland - the biggest intercept the British Typhoon jets ...
    Nato fighter jets intercept Russian aircraftFinancial Times
    NATO aircraft intercept record number of Russian aircraftAutoblog (blog)
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    German parliament shuts computer network after May hacker attack - Reuters

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    Reuters

    German parliament shuts computer network after May hacker attack
    Reuters
    BERLIN The German parliament will switch off its entire computer system for several days next month in order to repair the network after a cyber attack in May, its president said. Bundestag President Norbert Lammert said the IT network would be shut ...
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    Army faces recruit deficit, may miss 2015 goal

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        • Forget the debate this week over whether Congress should yank money used to give veterans more choice in health care so it can help plug a $2.5 billion budget gap that could close VA hospitals. U.S. Rep. David Jolly proposes scrapping the current Veterans Choice Program.

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        These 5 Stats Explain Turkey’s War on ISIS—and the Kurds

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