Friday, April 15, 2016

6:21 PM 4/15/2016 - Brazil Supreme Court rejects government bid to suspend impeachment vote - swissinfo.ch Friday April 15th, 2016 at 6:16 PM

Brazil Supreme Court rejects government bid to suspend impeachment vote - swissinfo.ch

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swissinfo.ch

Brazil Supreme Court rejects government bid to suspend impeachment vote
swissinfo.ch
RIO DE JANEIRO (Reuters) - A majority of Brazil's Supreme Court rejected on Friday a request by President Dilma Rousseff's attorney general to suspend Sunday's vote in the lower house on whether to impeach her, in a further blow for Rousseff who looks ...

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New Delhi's Street Children Publish Newspaper

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Newspapers occasionally write about the plight of children living in the streets, but a group of homeless kids in India's capital New Delhi is putting together their own monthly publication with stories about their struggles and their concerns. Balaknama, or "children's voice" is written, edited and compiled by children up to 19 years old and reaches about 10,000 readers. From poverty to child labor, underage marriages, sexual abuse and drugs - there is no shortage of...

The Czech Republic is getting a new name: Czechia - Washington Post

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Washington Post

The Czech Republic is getting a new name: Czechia
Washington Post
Politicians in the Czech Republic are set to put decades of debate to an end this week by officially announcing a new name for the country: Czechia. In a meeting with reporters this week, Foreign Minister Lubomir Zaoralek said he supported the move, ... 
Photo by Filip Singer/EPAVICE
 News

Czech Republic wants to be called Czechia (not Chechnya)Mashable
Czech Republic wants to be called Czechia insteadUPI.com
BuzzFeed News-Appeal-Democrat-GlobalPost-Deutsche Welle
all 50 
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Japan Assesses Damage After Strong Quake on Island of Kyushu

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Nine people were killed by the Thursday quake, and some 44,000 people were taking refuge in shelters and public buildings.

A Witness Places Mexican Federal Police at the Kidnapping of the 43 Missing Students 

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A commission investigating the disappearance of 43 Mexican students says it has found a witness who puts two federal police officers, and officers from another city, at the scene of their mass kidnapping, which was already thought to have involved local police.
The students have not been seen since buses they had commandeered to travel to Mexico City from the southwestern city of Iguala were stopped by authorities in September 2014. Charred remains of one student have been found at a trash dump, and the rest of the young people may have met the same fate, as investigators believe they were handed over to local narco-gangsters with influence over law enforcement.
The national human rights commission’s new witness, who has not been named, was present when a bus carrying 15 to 20 of the youths was stopped by Iguala police on a federal highway, the Associated Press reports. After a standoff, police tossed tear gas into the bus and began handcuffing and loading the students into pickup trucks, at which point the federal officers and police from the nearby city of Huitzuco showed up and — according to evidence gathered by the commission — helped out.
“The facts released today could constitute clear evidence of the coopting of municipal institutions by criminal organizations in Iguala, Cocula and, now with the information being released, probably Huitzuco,” said commission member Jose Larrieta Carrasco, according to AP. “In the same way it could be an example of the alleged involvement of federal police officers.”
[AP]

Contributing Op-Ed Writer: The End of Catholic Guilt

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Pope Francis is merely acknowledging the obvious. As before, he’s using words to change hearts.
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Russian Judge Resigns After Agreeing To Hear Case Against Putin 

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A Russian judge who agreed to accept a lawsuit filed against Russian President Vladimir Putin has abruptly resigned.

Fallen Russian soldier's family mourns with medal, and questions

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PALTSO, Russia (Reuters) - The 27-year-old Russian special forces officer smiles out of the picture in a flak jacket and camouflage hat. The last photo of Fyodor Zhuravlyov was taken in Syria, where he was deployed on a clandestine mission. At least his family know that much.









  

Polish leader hails shift to Christianity 1,050 years ago

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Poland’s president is leading formal celebrations marking the 1,050th anniversary of Christianity in Poland with a speech declaring the baptism of Poland’s first king as the most important historical event in the nation’s history.





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Flash Flooding Hits Iran

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Flash flooding has hit western and southwestern Iran following days of torrential spring rainfall. (RFE/RL's Radio Farda)

Russia's Lavrov and Kerry discuss Syria, Nagorno-Karabakh

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MOSCOW (Reuters) - Russia's Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov and U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry discussed the Syria crisis settlement in a phone talk on Friday, Russia's ministry said in a statement.









  

Bernie Sanders arrives at the Vatican

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Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders has arrived in Vatican City to speak at an economy and social conference.
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Man convicted in 1957 murder of 7-year-old to be freed - WGN-TV

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Washington Post

Man convicted in 1957 murder of 7-year-old to be freed
WGN-TV
CHICAGO — A man convicted of the 1957 murder of a 7-year-old girl learned that he will be set free. Lawyers for 76-year-old Jack McCullough asked the judge to release him, after the Dekalb County Prosecutor revealed evidence that he says proves ...
Prosecutor moves to dismiss 1957 cold case murder convictionCNN

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Sanders calls Pope Francis a ‘visionary’ during Vatican trip – video 

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Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders called Pope Francis a ‘visionary’ and praised his efforts to create a ‘moral economy’ during his visit to the Vatican on Friday. Earlier, Sanders addressed a Vatican conference on social justice and decried the gap between the world’s haves and have-nots
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Democrats Trade Barbs During New York Presidential Debate

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Candidates Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders had several sharp exchanges during Thursday's debate in Brooklyn, New York ahead of next Tuesday's very important New York primary.

Man wrongly convicted in 1957 Illinois murder to be released

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CHICAGO (AP) -- A 76-year-old man from Washington state who a prosecutor says was wrongly convicted in the abduction and killing of a 7-year-old Illinois schoolgirl in 1957 will be released from prison, a judge ordered Friday....

Read the Speech Bernie Sanders Gave at the Vatican - TIME

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TIME

Read the Speech Bernie Sanders Gave at the Vatican
TIME
Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is speaking at the Vatican Friday, praising Pope Francis and denouncing income inequality. The Democratic presidential candidate, who is Jewish, announced last week that he would attend a conference on income inequality at ...
Bernie Sanders: I annotated a speech by Pope FrancisWashington Post
Bernie Sanders, at Vatican City, Calls for a More Moral EconomyNew York Times
Bernie's holy detourPolitico
Los Angeles Times -ABC News -Reuters -Bloomberg
all 138 news articles »

Nemtsov Plaque In Yaroslavl Removed

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A plaque to mark the home of slain Russian politician Boris Nemtsov in the central Russian city of Yaroslavl has been removed.

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At the Vatican, Sanders blasts 'immoral' wealth inequality 

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VATICAN CITY (AP) -- Bernie Sanders issued a global call to action at the Vatican Friday to address "immoral and unsustainable" wealth inequality and poverty, using the high profile gathering to echo one of the central platforms of his presidential campaign....

Pope Francis to lay down a moral challenge for Europe in visit to refugee island 

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The visit will put in stark relief the continent’s decision to send migrants back across the sea.





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AP Explains: Why Brazilian president faces impeachment

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Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff is facing possible impeachment by Congress, with the lower Chamber of Deputies expected to vote on the measure on Sunday. The effort comes amid an angry public mood over the South American nation’s worst recession in decades and a big bribery scandal at the state oil company Petrobras, yet it is not tied to either of those. AP explains what’s behind the movement to oust her, and how it could play out:





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Unclear on US Rules, Banks, Corporations Wary of Doing Business in Iran 

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Three months after the implementation of the Iran nuclear deal, banks and other corporations are wary of doing business in the country due to concerns over running afoul of U.S. sanctions, especially as U.S. lawmakers ponder a clampdown over Iran’s missile development. The 2015 deal unfroze up to $100 billion in Iranian assets at overseas banks, loosened many restrictions on business transactions with the country, and reconnected Iranian banks to the SWIFT inter-bank global messaging...

Pakistan Rejects Allegation of Plotting Raid on CIA's Afghan Base 

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Pakistan on Friday rejected as “preposterous” allegations that its spy agency had links with the Haqqani network of militants and played a role in the 2009 suicide attack on a CIA base in eastern Afghanistan. A newly declassified U.S. document says an officer of Pakistan's Inter-Services Intelligence, or ISI, paid $200,000 to the militant network to carry out the deadly bombing on Forward Operating Base Chapman in the Afghan border province of Khost. It was one of the most...

Man wrongly convicted in 1957 Illinois murder to be released

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CHICAGO (AP) -- An Illinois judge vacated the conviction of a 76-year-old man in a 1957 killing and ordered his immediate release from prison Friday, meaning that one of the oldest cold cases to be tried in U.S. history has officially gone cold again....
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Tensions Flare at Egypt Red Sea Islands Protests

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Tensions flared in Egypt on Friday as protests over the handover of two islands to Saudi Arabia were dispersed or prevented by security forces with tear gas and military blockades. Outside the Journalist Syndicate, one of the few places where protesting is still legal in Cairo, police held their ground for most of the day while hundreds of people chanted anti-government slogans. Protesting the handover of the islands Tiran and Sanafir, activists shouted, "The people demand the end...

In Race to Capture Syria's Raqqa, Assad May Have Edge

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Islamic State-controlled territory in Syria has shrunk by nearly a quarter in the past few months, but Kurds, Syrian rebels and forces loyal to embattled President Bashar al-Assad have all grabbed pieces of the self-styled caliphate. Undeterred, the terror group's propagandists are maintaining their bravado, recently posting an online "travel brochure" depicting bucolic scenes around their Syrian stronghold in Raqqa and courting visitors. Earlier this week, French Defense...

Ex-Cop Wrongly Convicted Of '57 Killing Is Freed

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Jack McCullough will be released from prison after prosecutors found evidence to overturn his conviction in the 1957 killing of Maria Ridulph

The Obamas paid $81000 in federal taxes for 2015 - CBS News

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CBS News

The Obamas paid $81000 in federal taxes for 2015
CBS News
President Obama and first lady Michelle Obama reported an adjusted gross income of $436,065 and paid $81,472 in federal taxes for 2015, the White House said Friday. Those figures are from their 2015 federal income tax returns the White House released ...
Obamas Paid 18.7% in Taxes on $436065 Gross Income in 2015Bloomberg
Obamas paid effective tax rate of 18.7 percent in 2015Washington Times
Obamas release 2015 tax returnsThe Hill
The White House (blog)
all 13 news articles »

Zika Mutates Extremely Quickly, Which Is Why It’s So Scary

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One thing that’s especially confounding about Zika is that as soon as something about the virus is understood, it comes under question.
Until recently, experts believed Zika was a relatively benign virus spread by mosquitoes. But now that it’s been linked to more than 1,000 microcephaly cases, scientists have taken a closer look, recently declaring it “scarier than we initially thought,” as one U.S. health official put it this week. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently announced it is now absolutely confident that Zika causes microcephaly—a connection that was suspected but not proven. It also appears to be linked to other disorders like Guillain-Barré syndrome and other autoimmune syndromes. The virus, experts now know, can be transmitted through sex.
In a new twist, experts are questioning the idea that mosquitoes are the primary cause of transmission. In a new study, researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), looked at sequences of the Zika virus over decades and found notable changes in the virus over time, suggesting that the virus’ ability to mutate is a reason why it is able to trigger different types of disease. They also noticed that the sequenced strains of Zika from mosquitoes do not match all the strains in humans from this outbreak. This suggests that more people than was expected may be getting the virus some other way.
The virus was first discovered in 1947 and has caused some disease in Africa and Asia before notable outbreaks in Micronesia in 2007 and in French Polynesia in 2013. But the current outbreak is by far the worst. To figure out why, the UCLA team partnered with Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College in Beijing and compared 40 strains of Zika from past outbreaks as well as strains from the current one. The researchers analyzed some strains collected from people, some from monkeys, and some from mosquitoes. When sequences of the viruses were compared, the scientists noted a variety of differences between them.
“The things that change a lot [in the virus] might explain why it causes different disease now,” says study author Stephanie Valderramos, a fellow in obstetrics-gynecology at the David Geffen School ofMedicine at UCLA.
What’s also curious, the researchers note, is that the strains of the virus collected from humans in this outbreak haven’t matched the strains seen in mosquitoes.“We haven’t found any human sequences in the mosquito in recent history,” says Valderramos. “It could be we haven’t been looking hard enough. If we can’t find them, it brings into question whether the mosquito is the primary mode of transmission in the current epidemic.”
It’s possible, the researchers suggest, that other modes of transmission, like sex, may play a bigger role. Due to cases of sexually transmitted Zika—this week it was revealed it can be spread via anal sex as well as vaginal sex—the CDC released precautions that people who are in areas of active Zika transmission need to practice safe sex, and abstinence may be recommended during pregnancy. There are currently no areas of active Zika transmission in the U.S., but the virus is spreading locally in Puerto Rico.
“What’s new and interesting and scary is that this is the first time a virus transmitted by mosquitoes has been shown to spread in any other way,” says Valderramos.
The researchers of the current study say there’s much more that needs to be done before scientists will fully understand Zika. The team plans to continue studying the strains involved in the ongoing outbreak as a way to identify possible targets for drug and vaccines. “We need to broaden our thinking about how this disease can be transmitted and how to stop it,” says Valderramos.
 
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US Defense Secretary Visits Carrier in South China Sea

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Just a day after U.S. Secretary of Defense Ash Carter announced that American sailors had conducted joint patrols with the Philippines in the South China Sea, the Secretary decided to go there. VOA's Pentagon correspondent, Carla Babb, was with him for a first-hand look during his transit in the sea that’s likely to inflame tensions with China.

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US bars government employees from traveling to Acapulco

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The U.S. government is barring employees from traveling to the Mexican resort city of Acapulco, where a rise in homicides has made it one of the world’s deadliest cities in recent years.

The Correspondents

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The Correspondents is VOA’s weekly discussion of the world’s top stories, as seen through the eyes of our dedicated reporters in the US and around the globe. Hosted by Mil Arcega, our panel of journalists goes beyond the headlines to give listeners and viewer real context and understanding of what’s driving the story.

Russia Calls NATO's Europe Military Buildup 'Absolutely Unjustified' Ahead Of First Meeting Since Ukraine Conflict - International Business Times

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International Business Times

Russia Calls NATO's Europe Military Buildup 'Absolutely Unjustified' Ahead Of First Meeting Since Ukraine Conflict
International Business Times
The first meeting between NATO and the Russia Council since the start of the conflict in Ukraine is already off to a rough start. The Kremlin said Friday it would use the meeting scheduled for Wednesday as an opportunity to protest the military and ...
Russia baffled by 'distressed reaction' of American navy after its jets repeatedly buzz US warshipNational Post
Poland says NATO must speak to Russia from position of strengthReuters

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Russia is more dangerous than Isis, says Polish foreign minister - The Guardian

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The Guardian

Russia is more dangerous than Isis, says Polish foreign minister
The Guardian
“By all evidence, Russia's activity is a sort of existential threat because this activity can destroy countries,” said Waszczykowski, who was speaking in a debate on the future of Nato at the annual Globsec security forum in Bratislava on Friday. “We ...

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Russia is more dangerous than Isis, says Polish foreign minister 

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Witold Waszczykowski describes Russian activity as an ‘existential threat to Europe’ during a debate on the future of Nato
Russia is more dangerous than Islamic State, Poland’s foreign minister Witold Waszczykowski, told reporters during a visit to Slovakia.
“By all evidence, Russia’s activity is a sort of existential threat because this activity can destroy countries,” said Waszczykowski, who was speaking in a debate on the future of Nato at the annual Globsec security forum in Bratislava on Friday.
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ABSCAM agents to FBI chief: Bureau's 'reputation' on the line in Clinton probe - Fox News

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Fox News

ABSCAM agents to FBI chief: Bureau's 'reputation' on the line in Clinton probe
Fox News
Former FBI agents who worked the notorious 1970s sting operation known as ABSCAM have written FBI Director James Comey to warn that nothing less than the bureau's "reputation" is on the line as the investigation into Hillary Clinton's email practices ...

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Putin’s Main Target in Syria: Helping al-Assad Win the Civil War

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On March 14, President Vladimir Putin surprised both friend and foe by announcing that the Russian military mission in Syria was “mostly accomplished” and ordering the withdrawal of “most of our forces” (Kremlin.ru, March 14; see EDM, March 1721). A month later, it became apparent Russia’s engagement in Syria still continues and that Putin has not abandoned his long-time ally, Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. The partial redeployment of attack jets back to Russia was a shrewd tactical move that Putin dressed up as potential change in strategy. By the end of March, according to the defense ministry, “all tactical jets designated for withdrawal have been redeployed to Russia” together with some combat helicopters and ground support. The remaining Russian forces continue to attack “terrorists” in Syria and support the pro-al-Assad forces (RIA Novosti, March 28).
A tentative and partial ceasefire brokered by Moscow and Washington went into force on February 27. Some of the Russian attack jet flew back together with several planeloads of support personnel, but all the heavy military equipment stayed in Syria, together with the bulk of the ground troops, special forces troops and antiaircraft missile batteries. While some attack aircraft were withdrawn, new assets were introduced: Russia’s most modern attack helicopter gunships, the Mi-28N Night Hunter and Ka-52 Alligator. During the first five months of the Russian air campaign in Syria, the older Mi-24 and Mi-35 (a modification of the Mi-24) helicopter gunships were deployed to guard the Hmeymim airbase. Last month, as the number of attack jets was reduced, the newest helicopters began flying attack sorties and were reportedly actively engaged in driving Islamic State (IS) forces out of the ancient desert city of Palmyra (RIA Novosti, March 28). After Putin’s announced withdrawal, Russian casualties continued. A special forces lieutenant was killed fighting the IS in Palmyra; and on April 12, an Mi-28N helicopter crashed in Homs province, killing both pilots (Interfax, April 12).
The official reason given for continued Russian military engagement in Syria after the declaration of cessation of hostilities is the need to fight jihadists from the Islamic State and the al-Qaeda-connected al-Nusra Front. The offensive by al-Assad’s forces on Palmyra, planned together with Russian military advisors and supported by Russian forces, was tacitly welcomed by the West as a move against the IS—instead of again being an attack on the moderate Syrian opposition. There was hope that after capturing the desert crossroads town of Palmyra, the Russian-supported offensive would continue east and northeast, deeper into IS-controlled territory (Interfax, March 30). This did not materialize: Palmyra is a prize on its own—its capture was a propaganda bonus both to Putin and al-Assad. On top of that, there are oil fields in the town’s vicinity. When Palmyra fell to the IS last May, with it were lost the last commercially important oil fields the al-Assad regime controlled; and now the Syrian government has taken them back.
Neither Putin nor al-Assad appear willing to begin an all-out offensive to destroy the Islamic State while opposition forces in the rear are left undefeated. Last week, speaking to the press in St. Petersburg, Putin insisted: “Our main task in Syria was to reinforce the Syrian state and its legitimate government [al-Assad].” This task has been achieved, but the situation “is still far from a decisive turnaround” (Interfax, April 7).
This week, in Damascus, Syrian Prime Minister Wael Nader al-Halqi told a visiting delegation of Russian parliamentarians: “We, with our Russian partners, are preparing an operation to liberate Aleppo and block all illegitimate armed rebel groups that are not part of or have violated the ceasefire agreement” (TASS, April 10). Al-Halqi’s statement seems to indicate possible preparations to begin a major offensive in and around Aleppo against the Syrian opposition, using as a pretext alleged ceasefire violations and the presence of al-Nusra fighters who—unlike the Islamic State—are often intermixed with other more moderate opposition groups.
On April 11, at a briefing in Moscow, the chief of the Main Operational Directorate of the General Staff, Lieutenant-General Sergei Rudskoy, accused the al-Nusra Front of concentrating up to 10,000 fighters and heavy weapons close to Aleppo and of attacking government (al-Assad) forces in an attempt to cut the Damascus–Aleppo road and isolate the north of Syria. According to Rudskoy, Russian jets and al-Assad’s forces are in action in and around Aleppo to stop al-Nusra, but “no one is planning to storm the city.” Moscow is keen to push Washington into accepting the value of bilateral deals to resolve the Syria conflict and possibly to use the same big power concert understanding in other places, like Ukraine, to decide the plight of lesser nations. Rudskoy insisted the Russo-US ceasefire agreement in Syria is important and called on Washington to do its part in reining in the Syrian opposition (Syria.mil.ru, April 11).
During the five-year-long Syrian civil war, Aleppo, as many other towns, has been divided by deeply entrenched positions, where fighters and civilians hide from artillery and bombs. But during the second Chechen war in the early 2000s, the Russian military developed reliable tactics to break prolonged standoffs and sieges with heavy aerial and artillery bombardments, including by the use of incendiary and thermobaric warheads, also known as vacuum or fuel bombs. The thermobaric weapon of choice of the Russian military is the TOS-1A “Solntsepyok” (“Sunburn”) Heavy Flamethrower System. The TOS-1A was deployed in Syria by last September; it was used to effectively dislodge rebels from mountain hideouts in northern Latakia province and recently in the storming of Palmyra (Ridus.ru, March 29).
The ТОС-1А launches heavy but relatively short-range (up to 3.5 kilometers) missiles that deliver thermobaric warheads, which scorch anyone hiding in dugouts, tunnels and bunkers. The ТОС-1А has been filmed in action in Latakia and Palmyra. In Syria it may be manned by Russian contractors or advisers. The use of the ТОС-1А against populated settlements could violate international law, but its use in Chechnya and now in Syria does not seem to cause much international alarm. The ТОС-1А could be a game-changer in the Syrian civil war, and the temptation to forcibly end the Aleppo quagmire could push al-Assad and his allies into decisive action. “Liberating” Aleppo is a high priority goal as its fall would demoralize the Syrian opposition, possibly finally putting al-Assad’s overall victory within reach.
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Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, And Operations, chapter 01 

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Title:                      Comprehensive Bibliographies
Author:                Paul W. Blackstock
Blackstock, Paul W. (1978) and Frank L. Schaf, Jr.”Chapter 1: Comprehensive Bibliographies,”Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, And Covert Operations: A Guide to Information Sources.Detroit: Gale Research Co.
LCCN:    74011567

Subjects

Date Updated:  April 14, 2016
Chapter 1. Comprehensive Bibliographies
Gunzenhauser, Max (1968). Geschichte Der Geheimen Nachrichtendienst: (Spionage, Sabotage Und Abwehr}: Literatur Berlchte Und Bibliographie. Frankfurt: Bernard und Graefe
“The second comprehensive bibliography of secret intelligence. An 80-page introductory essay precedes some 400 pages of bibliography. Although a smaller effort than Harris (1968), it includes many items, particularly German ones, missed by the earlier work, Moreover, the two bibliographies complement one another as the Gunzenhauser bibliography is organized chronologically and geographically while the Harris one is organized under 27 topics.”[1]
The 4,000 entries cover tites in English and several European languages, without annotation, although the most important works are discussed in the introductory critique of the literature, The discussion of strategic intelligence is relatively weak; nevertheless, this work is an indispensable guide for the scholar and researcher, and has been used extensively in compiling the present bibliography.
Harris, William R. (1968). Intelligence And National Security: A Bibliography With Selected Annotations. rev. ed. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Univ., Center for International Affairs
[1] Whaley, Barton (1973). Codeword BARBAROSSACambridge, MA: MIT Press, pp. 329-330

 
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Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, And Operations, chapter 02 

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Title:                      Selective Bibliographies
Author:                  Paul W. Blackstock
Blackstock, Paul W. (1978) and Frank L. Schaf, Jr.”Chapter 2: Selective Bibliographies,” Intelligence,Espionage, Counterespionage, And Covert Operations: A Guide to Information Sources. Detroit: Gale Research Co.
LCCN:    74011567

Subjects

Date Updated:  April 14, 2016
Chapter 2. SELECTIVE BIBLIOGRAPHIES
As a result of the interest in intelligence stimulated by World War II, three bibliographies on intelligence and espionage were prepared by U.S. agencies. A fourth bibliography was authored by Joseph S. Galland. All suffer from being out of date. Additionally, the majority of the items in the three government bibliographies are mainly personal memoirs by individual espionage or counterespionage agents, and illustrate the limitations for serious study of all such works.
Galland, Joseph Stanislaus (1945, 1970). An Historical And Analytical Bibliography of The Literature of Cryptology. New York: AMS Press
Haven, Violet S. (1942), comp. “Espionage: Bibliography—1942.” Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice Library
This list consists of sixteen typewritten pages containing about 250 entries, with emphasis on counterespionage.
U.S. Department of State (1948). “Intelligence, a Bibliography of its Functions, Methods and Techniques, Part I, Bibliography No. 33.” Washington, DC: December 20, 1948. Mimeographed, unbound.
U.S. Department of State (1948). “Intelligence, a Bibliography of Its Functions, Methods, and Techniques, Part II: Periodical and Newspaper Articles, Bibliography No. 331.” Washington, DC: April 11, 1949. Mimeographed, unbound.
The two-part State Department bibliography of more than 700 items was compiled from an unpublished bibliography developed by the Office of Strategic Services (OSS), and from entries in the Library of Congress card index,

 
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Further arrests in Edward Lin spy case ‘possible’, says US official 

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An American official has told Newsweek magazine that the possibility of further arrests in the espionage case of United States Navy flight officer Edward Lin should not be ruled out. 

Every Dollar Counts: New Army Policy Aims To Shake Up Spending Practices

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The Army is rolling out a new policy Friday projected to shake up how the service spends its money.
       

No links to foreign terrorists found on San Bernardino iPhone so far, officials say - Ames Tribune

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CNN

No links to foreign terrorists found on San Bernardino iPhone so far, officials say
Ames Tribune
... that happened in the United States, we believed we had to use all lawful tools to find out whether there was evidence on that phone that either shed more light on what these two killers had done,” FBI Director James BComey said at Ohio's Kenyon ...
Banks Want In On Check-Cashing BusinessPYMNTS.com
FBI Paid Hackers To Help Unlock San Bernardino Shooter's iPhoneDark Reading
FBI's Zero-Day iPhone Hack: Many QuestionsBankInfoSecurity.com (blog)
Georgia Today-Social Barrel (blog)
all 123 news articles »
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Page 8

IRAN: Better To Be Feared Than Loved

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Panama Papers: China detains lawyer after he shares details of leaders online - The Guardian

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The Guardian

Panama Papers: China detains lawyer after he shares details of leaders online
The Guardian
Ge Yongxi, an outspoken attorney known for defending underground church leaders and political and social activists, was taken from his home in Foshan, a city in southern China, at about midnight on Thursday by five plain-clothes policemen, according to ...
China Issues, Deletes Article Defending President Over Panama PapersRadio Free Asia

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Afghan military says it hit Islamic State in eastern province

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The Afghan military says its air force has hit Islamic State militants in the eastern province of Nangarhar, killing at least 40 insurgents.
     

UK military officers give targeting training to Saudi military - The Guardian

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The Guardian

UK military officers give targeting training to Saudi military
The Guardian
The extent of the assistance to Saudi units from the Ministry of Defence has emerged from freedom of information (FoI) requests made by the human rights organisation Reprieve, which is urging the British government to reconsider providing military support. 

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Did Pakistan secretly fund an attack on CIA officers in 2009? Memo makes controversial claim 

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The document, marked "secret" and still heavily redacted, makes a startling claim: The Pakistan government helped fund a suicide bombing in Afghanistan.

U.S. government ranks worst among major industries on cybersecurity: Report 

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U.S. federal, state and local government agencies have the worst cybersecurity protocols compared to 17 major private industries, including transportation, retail and health care, according to a new report released Thursday.
The report, from venture-backed security risk monitoring startup SecurityScorecard, measured the security of government and private industries across 10 ...
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Terrorist's iPhone didn't turn up any useful information, FBI admits - Telegraph.co.uk

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Telegraph.co.uk

Terrorist's iPhone didn't turn up any useful information, FBI admits
Telegraph.co.uk
US law enforcement agents have admitted that they are yet to find valuable information in the San Bernardino gunman's iPhone 5c that became the focus of a major legal battle between Apple and the FBI. The FBI said it is yet to find anything ...
The FBI still hasn't found any useful info on San Bernardino terrorist's iPhoneBGR
Why Apple and the FBI Are Still at Odds Over EncryptionNewsweek
FBI requests warrant to unlock iPhone 5c connected to California murder investigationApple Insider
Popular Science-CNET-Quartz
all 118 news articles »

Information Technology in A Democracy 

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Title:                      Information Technology in A Democracy
Author:                Alan F. Westin
Westin, Alan F. (1971), ed. Information Technology in A Democracy. Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Press
LCCN:    72143233

Subjects

Series

Date Posted:      April 15, 2016
Reviewed by Paul W. Blackstock and Frank L. Schaf[1]
The editor describes this work as “an edited collection of original and secondary materials about government use of information technology … [which] includes descriptions of information technology systems by the agency spokesman and consultants who have created them, providing readers with the operating assumptions, systems objectives, and stages of development as the managers of these systems see these happenings.”
[1] Blackstock, Paul W. (1978) and Frank L. Schaf, Jr. Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, And Covert Operations: A Guide to Information Sources. Detroit: Gale Research Co., p. 88-89.

 

Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, And Covert Operations: A Guide to Information Sources, chapter 3

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Title:                      Encyclopedia Articles
Author:                 Paul W. Blackstock
Blackstock, Paul W. (1978) and Frank L. Schaf, Jr.”Chapter 3: Encyclopedia Articles,” Intelligence,Espionage, Counterespionage, And Covert Operations: A Guide to Information Sources. Detroit: Gale Research Co.
LCCN:    74011567

Subjects

Date Updated:  April 15, 2016
The concept of covert operations is so new that there are no encyclopedia articles on the subject in spite of the fact that the United States and Great Britain developed special agencies (the American Office of Strategic Services and the British Special Operations Executive) to COIT}’ out such operations during World War II.
The first encyclopedia article on espionage appears in Diderot’s classic Encyclopedie (Paris, 1751, V, 971) under the rubric espion. The spy is defined as “a person paid to examine the actions, movements, etc. of another, and especially to discover the state of military affairs.” This brief article also contains the famous observation that “an ambassador is sometimes a distinguished spy who is protected by the law of nations.”
Most encyclopedia articles on either espionage or intelligence reflect the fact that intelligence agencies regard any disclosure of sources or methods as a breach of security. Hence the articles tend to be historical summaries rather than substantive or analytical treatments of either espionage or intelligence. With a few recent exceptions most articles also omit consideration of modern scientific and technological advances such as technical sensors, which have produced important new means of collecting information. Representative articles are annotated be low.
Bol’shaia Sovetskaia Entsiklopedlla. 2nd ed. Moscow; 1955. Vol.35, pp. 591-92.[1]
Although the USSR has one of the most formidable combined espionage-intelligence-security police organizations of modern times[2], this edition of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia had only one article under the heading “intelligence” (разведка, razvedka) which dealt exclusively with military reconnaissance. There was nothing under the rubrics “espionage” or “security services.”
Encyclopedia Americana
Blackstock, Paul W. “Espionage.” International ed. New York, Americana Corp., 1973. Vol. 10, pp. 584-87.
The article discusses and evaluates espionage as one of the means by which intelligence agencies collect information through their clandestine services, and notes the relative decline of its importance as new technological means of surveillance have been developed (technical sensors). Summarizes principles and techniques of recruitment, cover, communications, agent handling, and organization of clandestine services.
Hoover, John Edgar. “Espionage and Counterespionage.” New York: Americana Corp., 1965. Vol. 10, pp. 504-6.
The article by the former director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation begins with a definition of terms, followed by a historical summary of famous espionage cases from ancient times through the post-World War II period. There is a section on the espionage agent and his training, another on techniques, and a final section .on “security end democracy,” which reflects the familiar cold war orientation of the author of Masters of Deceit.[3]
Ransom, Herry Howe. “Intelligence, Strategic.” lnternational ed. New York: Americana Corp., 1973, Vol. 15, pp. 246-48.
This substantive article by the author of The Intelligence Establishment[4] stresses basic definitions and concepts, the intelligence process (collection, evaluation, and dissemination to decision makers), and describes briefly the intelligence organizations of the United States, Great Britain, and the Soviet Union.
ENCYCLOPEDIA BRITANNICA
Don, W.J. [pseud.]. “Espionage.” Chicago: Encyclopoedia Britannica, 1954. Vol. 12, pp. 459-62.
The author is presumably William Joseph Donovan, head of the U.S. Office of Strategic Services during World War II. The article is a general survey which discusses the necessity, scope, types of intelligence, and organization, stressing the argument: “It is only when intelligence collection, analysis, evaluation, synthesis and dissemination are in one pierce and under one direction that the optimum value can be obtained.”
Ransom, Harry Howe. “Intelligence end Counterintelligence.” 15th ed. Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica, 1974. Vol. 9, pp. 679-86.
The author of this excellent, substantive article also wrote the article on the some subject for the ENCY-CLOPEDIA AMERICANA. It discusses definitions, concepts, the intelligence process itself, and describes briefly the intelligence organizations of the great world powers. Brief bibliography included.
Stessin, Lawrence. “Intelligence, Military, Political and Industrial.” Chicago: Encyclopaedia Brltannlca, 1972. Vol. .12, pp. 347-50.
The article is for the most port a general historical survey with brief descriptions of the modern intelligence organizations of the United States, the USSR, Great Britain, and France, followed by a section on industrial espionage.
ENCYCLOPEDIA OF THE SOCIAL SCIENCES
Rowan, Richard Wilmer. “Espionage.” New York: Macmillan, 1931. Vol. 5, pp. 594-96.
This three-page article by a prolific writer and historian in the espionage field is devoted almost entirely to a history of espionage since ancient times, with an added paragraph on industrial espionage and a generalized discussion of countermeasures.
INTERNATIONAL ENCYCLOPEDIA OF THE SOCIAL SCIENCES
Ransom, Harry Howe . “Intelligence, Political and Military.” New York: Macmillan and the Free Press, 1968. pp. 415-21.
The article is a general survey which stresses definitions, reviews the basic literature, and gives suggestions for further social science research.
Seth, Ronald. Encyclopedia of Espionage. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1974. 718 p. Index. British ed. London: New English Library, 1975. 683 p. Bibliography.
A remarkable compilation of information on espionage by a very prolific author on intelligence subject matter and a World War II British agent. Easy to use, the encyclopedia arranges entries by names of spies (the first entry is ex-Soviet agent Colonel Rudolph Abel), intelligence organizations, espionage networks, and well-known espionage incidents. Each entry is followed by bibliographic references for additional reading or research, The author notes that “where no such bibliography is provided, in most cases the information has come only from my notebooks.”
Although this work is billed on the cover of the English edition as “the Spy’s Who’s Who,” its coverage is almost entirely historical. It is useful as a biographical reference and also because it describes various networks and operations such as the Red Orchestra or Gieske ‘s EnglandspieI. However, there are many curious gaps in the biographical coverage. For example, there are almost three pages on Sir Paul Dukes who directed British espionage in the USSR during the revolutionary period, but nothing at all on Sir Bruce Lockhart, Sidney Reilly, Boris Savinkov, Captain George Hill, and other British agents active during the same period. Moreover, the lack of an index makes the work more suitable for bedside reading than for reference purposes.
[1] The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (GSE) (Russian: Большая советская энциклопедия, or БСЭBolshaya sovetskaya entsiklopediya) is one of the largest Russian-language encyclopedias published by the USSR from 1926 to 1990, and again since 2002 (under the name Bolshaya Rossiyskaya entsiklopediya or Great Russian Encyclopedia).
[2] Of course, since the collapse of the Soviet Union, the FSB (successor to the KGB) is no less skilled that was the KGB.
[3] Hoover, J. Edgar (1958). Masters of Deceit: The Story Of Communism In America And How to Fight It. New York: Henry Holt & Co.
[4] Ransom, Harry Howe (1970). The Intelligence Establishment. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Univ. Press

 
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· · · · · ·

Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, And Covert Operations, Part I 

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Title:                      Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, And Covert Operations, Part I
Author:                  Paul W. Blackstock
Blackstock, Paul W. (1978) and Frank L. Schaf, Jr. Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, AndCovert Operations: A Guide to Information Sources. Detroit: Gale Research Co.,
LCCN:    74011567

Subjects

Date Updated:  April 15, 2016
Part I GENERAL BIBLIOGRAPHIC RESOURCES
Due to the confusion of terms, books and articles on intelligence, espionage, and covert operations are listed under a wide variety of headings in the subject index of the U.S. Library of Congress and in the corresponding catalogs of other libraries. However, there are two comprehensive bibliographies which may be consulted to identify books on these subjects. Each of these bibliographies has an extended critique of the literature. In addition there are certain specialized bibliographies which are useful to the person interested in researching a specific aspect of intelligence, espionage, or covert operations. These comprehensive and specialized bibliographies are cited in the following pages.
As a result of the interest in intelligence stimulated by World War II, three bibliographies on intelligence and espionage were prepared by U.S. agencies. A fourth bibliography was authored by Joseph S. Galland. All suffer from being out of date. Additionally, the majority of the items in the three government bibliographies are mainly personal memoirs by individual espionage or counterespionage agents, and illustrate the limitations for serious study of all such works.
The concept of covert operations is so new that there are no encyclopedia articles on the subject in spite of the fact that the United States and Great Britain developed special agencies (the American Office of Strategic Services and the British Special Operations Executive) to COIT}’ out such operations during World War II.
The first encyclopedia article on espionage appears in Diderot’s classic Encyclopedie (Paris, 1751, V, 971) under the rubric espion. The spy is defined as “a person paid to examine the actions, movements, etc. of another, and especially to discover the state of military affairs.” This brief article also contains the famous observation that “an ambassador is sometimes a distinguished spy who is protected by the law of nations.”
Most encyclopedia articles on either espionage or intelligence reflect the fact that intelligence agencies regard any disclosure of sources or methods as a breach of security. Hence the articles tend to be historical summaries rather than substantive or analytical treatments of either espionage or intelligence. With a few recent exceptions most articles also omit consideration of modern scientific and technological advances such as technical sensors, which have produced important new means of collecting information. Representative articles are annotated be low.

 
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Has Argentina entered the 'War on Drugs'? - Insightcrime.org

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Insightcrime.org

Has Argentina entered the 'War on Drugs'?
Insightcrime.org
There they met with officials from the US Department of State, the DEA and FBI, among others, for technical advice on interventions and weapons. (As InSight Crime reported at the time, Argentine and US ... All this hardware has been used in the context ...

Pentagon to Congress: We Need Base Closures

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WASHINGTON — Pentagon officials say the Defense Department is wasting money on excess facilities and needs Congress to step in and close them, but they face an uphill fight.
       
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