Saturday, August 27, 2016

DEBKAfile: Incomplete US-Russian cooperation exacerbates to the risk of collision between US, Russian and Syrian warplanes in the sky. | FBI's massive porn sting puts internet privacy in crossfire - The Seattle Times

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DEBKAfile: Incomplete US-Russian cooperation exacerbates to the risk of collision between US, Russian and Syrian warplanes in the sky. 
The new de facto borders established by the Kurdish fighters raise the potential for conflict between Iraq's Kurds and Arabs after any eventual defeat of 
Islamic State, just as in neighboring Syria, where Kurds have also dramatically expanded their zone of control.

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US Marines in Pacific to get new commander

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KANEOHE BAY, Hawaii (AP) - The U.S. Marines are getting a new commander in the Pacific.
Lt. Gen. David Berger is scheduled to take over at Marine Corps Forces Pacific on Friday. He succeeds Lt. Gen. John Toolan, who is retiring.
Pacific Forum CSIS Executive Director Brad Glosserman says Berger ...

Russian surveillance measures could cost telephone companies $156B: Report 

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Complying with new surveillance measures recently approved by Russian President Vladimir Putin may cost the nation's telecommunication companies upwards of $156 billion — about 450 percent more than previously estimated — according to the CEO of a Moscow-based data storage company.
Included within a suite of security measures signed by ...

Congress urged to investigate security concerns raised by Apple flaws used by 'digital arms dealers' 

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Rep. Ted Lieu, who has a degree is computer science, urged his colleagues Thursday to hold a hearing on mobile phone security after Apple rushed to repair critical iPhone vulnerabilities reportedly being leveraged by state-sponsored hackers.
The California Democrat was among the first lawmakers to formally weigh in this week ...

British anti-terrorism raid nets 5 suspects; army bomb-disposal team in Birmingham 

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An anti-terrorism raid in England on Friday netted five suspects across the country.
An army bomb disposal squad was called in as a "precautionary measure" as police arrested five men who allegedly prepared a U.K. terror attack.
Two men ages 32 and 37 were arrested in Staffordshire and another three, ...

White House says Iran's harassment of U.S. Navy ships 'not acceptable' 

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The White House said Friday that the Iranian navy's behavior was "not acceptable" in causing two close encounters with U.S. war ships in the Persian Gulf.
"This is already a volatile region of the world, and in a compressed space like the Strait of Hormuz, it only increases the risk ...

The Latest: Computer hack exposes millions in Northwest

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BOISE, Idaho (AP) - The Latest on a computer breach involving Northwest hunting and fishing license sales (all times local):
1:24 p.m.
Officials say a computer breach in a vendor's system that processes online hunting and fishing license sales has exposed several million records containing personal information in Idaho, Oregon ...
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Air Force says retired 4-star general under investigation

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WASHINGTON (AP) - The Air Force says a retired four-star general is under investigation for alleged sexual misconduct.
An Air Force spokesman, Col. Patrick Ryder, said Friday the general is Arthur J. Lichte. Ryder said it would be inappropriate for him to comment further, beyond saying the Air Force takes ...

Metro Officer Charged With Aiding ISIS Remained With Agency Despite Years of FBI Monitoring 

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The Washington, D.C., Metro Transit Police officer charged earlier this month with attempting to provide material support to ISIS was not earlier terminated from the department despite being under federal monitoring for seven years, Metro officials said Thursday.
Metro authorities alerted the FBI when Nicholas Young began exhibiting “abnormal” behavior, but the 36-year-old remained with the agency’s patrol bureau while the federal monitoring transpired until he was arrested Aug. 3 on terrorism charges, the Washington Post reported. Young was then terminated from the agency.
Young was jailed after sending mobile messaging cards to an undercover federal agent, believing they would be used by ISIS militants to communicate abroad, according to court records.
The incident marked the first time a U.S. law enforcement officer was accused of attempting to aid a terrorist group.
Young told interviewers at the Metro Transit Police Department in 2015 that he dressed up as Jihadi John for Halloween in 2014. The ISIS militant beheaded journalist James Foley in a July 2014 propaganda video. He was killed in November by a U.S. drone strike.
Metro Board members pressed Transit Police Chief Ron Pavlik to explain Thursday why Young was permitted to stay with the department despite being under federal watch.
Pavlik said Young never posed a threat to Metro employees or passengers while he was monitored.
“At any point in time if Mr. Young’s behavior escalated to the point where he was going to take action … steps were in place to mitigate those,” Pavlik said. “The FBI, in our partnership, had means in place that if he posed an immediate risk to any of our employees or our riders that action would have been taken swiftly.”
“Unfortunately, investigations of this magnitude take a long period of time. We have all kinds of rules and laws that we have to adhere to. So it never goes as quick as we like but we’re happy that it ended the way it did,” he continued.

Can American Colleges Be Fixed? 

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Last week, Wisconsin Senator Ron Johnson lashed out at what he called the “higher education cartel” of tenured professors for blocking reforms that could reduce ballooning tuition and fees: “We’ve got the Internet—you have so much information available. Why do you have to keep paying different lecturers to teach the same course? You get one solid lecturer and put it up online and have everybody available to that knowledge for a whole lot cheaper? But that doesn’t play very well to tenured professors in the higher education cartel. So again, we need disruptive technology for our higher education system.” Johnson went on to suggest that students could learn as much and more efficiently by watching Ken Burns’s documentary The Civil War than by taking a history class.
It’s a common complaint among conservatives that many tenured professors “radicalize” students with Marx and gender theory while living royally off of state funding and federal student loans. Online and competency-based education will fix both, according to critics like Johnson and Scott Walker, by limiting professors’ unchecked power and improving efficiency with market-based solutions.
There’s just one problem, according to Peter Augustine Lawler, the Dana Professor of Government at Berry College and a regular contributor to National ReviewModern Age, and many other conservative publications: It won’t work.
It may be true, Lawler argues in his latest collection of essays, American Heresies and Higher Education, that some professors at American universities use their positions for ideological activism, do very little work, and inflate grades to earn positive course evaluations from students. Still, it’s unlikely that they are single-handedly responsible for the dumbing-down of undergraduate education, nor are they responsible for skyrocketing tuition.
The real culprits are the twin evils of federal student loans and accreditation. The availability of a seemingly endless supply of federal cash for students who, until recently, were willing to drop $50,000 to $100,000 for a credential that is still required for most well-paying jobs, has led to an “amenities race” for students, according to Lawler. Dorms are now like hotels. Concierge services are provided to students via “student affairs” offices to maximize “health, safety, and choice” on campus. On-site “amateur” sports entertain students on the weekends and supposedly build community.
The string attached to this federal cash is accreditation. In order to receive federal funding or accept students with federal loans, colleges must be accredited by a recognized regional body. These bodies are not federal agencies. They are independent and managed by other professors and university administrators. Still, the bureaucratic demands increase every year. Almost everything learned in every course must now be stated and demonstrated with “learning outcomes.” Schools must show “continual improvement,” develop “quality enhancement programs,” constantly measure “institutional effectiveness,” and so forth. It used to be that a school was evaluated every 10 years. Now it is more or less ongoing.
The number of administrative staff it takes to provide the lifestyle students expect and oversee the increasing amount of paperwork for accreditation is huge. Lawler doesn’t provide any figures, but they are relatively well-known. To give just one example: The number of full-time faculty in the California State University system increased slightly between 1975 and 2008, from 11,614 to 12,019, while the number of administrators nearly quadrupled during the same period, from 3,800 to 12,183.
In short, American colleges are suffering from administrative bloat, which increases every year at the hand of career managers who value standardization and procedures above all else, and who already put a great deal of trust in technology and market solutions. If the relative reduction in the number of full-time faculty per students over the past 30 years did not lead to a more efficient and affordable college education, it’s unclear how further reducing it could. Furthermore, it is unclear how increasing the use of technology—online education—already embraced at most schools will change anything.
Lawler isn’t against technology, nor is he against market solutions. What we need, he argues, are market solutions to fix the actual problems. His solution to the crisis in American higher education is to greatly reduce the amount of work required for accreditation, which would partially reduce the need for an army of administrators. Instead of a multi-year process, make accreditation a spot-check, where a small team of peers arrives unannounced on a college campus to check the books, faculty credentials, visit a few classes, and look over course syllabi. Whether or not this would be enough is unclear, and it seems that changing how much funding is available to students would have to be addressed as well, but it would be a step in the right direction. It might even curtail the pandering to students we see at a number of colleges—the provision of “safe spaces” and renaming of buildings—to the extent that it’s mostly college administrators who view students as “consumers” and espouse the view that “the consumer is always right.”  
American Heresies and Higher Education is about more than fixing the practical problems facing colleges today—much more, in fact. Lawler tackles the role of religion in American democracy and education, the danger of libertarian secularization, the value of the humanities, and the delusions of transhumanism, among other things. He rightly takes the Socratic Method down a notch in one essay and esotericism in another (“I don’t think we should practice esoteric writing, and I don’t even think it ever faithfully or unambiguously served the truth.”)
Wise, funny, and clear-sighted, American Heresies and Higher Education is a book for anyone who wants to know what’s really wrong with American higher education and what might be done about it.
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Pentagon Has Flooded Iraq and Afghanistan with More Than One Million Guns 

[Obama: Global arms dealer-in-chief]

The Pentagon has shipped more than a million small arms to Iraq and Afghanistan’s defense forces

center for public integrity

The quantity of arms contracted for export – worth several billion dollars – is greater than the number of personnel in their security forces and far more than the Pentagon has routinely indicated

AP_479649699267
An Afghan Army soldier picks up his weapon at a training facility in the outskirts of Kabul, Afghanistan, Tuesday, Nov. 26, 2013.  Anja Niedringhaus/AP
The Pentagon has spent billions of dollars since 2001 funneling roughly more than a million assault rifles, pistols, shotguns, and machine guns into Iraq and Afghanistan, helping to fuel lasting conflict there, according to a new report by a London-based nonprofit research and advocacy group Action on Armed Violence.
At least 949,582 of these small arms were given to security forces in Iraq, and at least 503,328 small arms were given to local forces in Afghanistan, the group said. They called this an “under-estimate” based on the information they were able to acquire.
If the figures are correct, the US exports amounted to more than one small arm for each member of Afghanistan’s security forces, which totaled roughly 355,000 soldiers, police, and airmen in February 2015, according to a NATO operational update on the force. The number of armaments sent to Iraq also vastly exceeded the current size of that country’s active military and paramilitaries – 209,000, according to the International Institute for Strategic Studies’ 2016 Military Balance report.
Until now, the Pentagon hasn’t published such a tally of its own, so the group’s researchers spent a year scouring multiple databases to arrive at its estimate: a general Pentagon contract list, a government-wide contracting list, and multiple government reports on military spending. They finally calculated that the overall value of the contractually-agreed small arms shipments, just to those two countries, was roughly $2.16 billion.
U.S. intelligence reports and eyewitnesses have previously said that a significant fraction of the U.S.-financed arms were either lost or stolen, and that many wound up in the hands of forces opposed to US interests, including terrorist groups such as the Islamic State, or ISIS.
In 2007, for example, the General Accountability Office said the coalition forces in Iraq could not account for 190,000 U.S.-supplied weapons. A July 2014 audit by the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction sharply criticized the Pentagon for not paying adequate attention to the fate of weaponry sent to Afghanistan, citing rampant discrepancies in records of gun serial numbers and other problems. In many instances over the past two years, U.S.-advised forces in those two countries have engaged in protracted clashes with terrorists equipped with captured caches of U.S. small arms, as well as U.S. tanks, artillery, and armored personnel carriers.
“There are direct and real consequences,” said Iain Overton, a veteran investigative journalist who is the group’s director, including “a destabilized Middle East.” He said Americans believe “that good guys with guns will get rid of bad buys with guns but that system doesn’t work when you throw guns into lawless, anarchic societies.” His group says its funding comes from “governments, institutions, and foundations,” and that it has a “partnership” with Norway’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
The report was released as international discussions are under way in Geneva about how to improve the implementation of a 2013 accord meant to provide transparency about small arms transfers, known as the Arms Trade Treaty. While the treaty does not restrict the number or type of weaponry that can be exported, it asks signatories not to sell arms that will create an overwhelming risk of negative consequences, including war crimes and attacks on civilians. The United States has signed the treaty but has not ratified it and is not a state party. As a result, it has not submitted annual reports of its arms transfers to others, as the treaty requires.
Indeed, finding information on arms exports to Iraq and Afghanistan is like trying to “[put] together a jigsaw puzzle with only half the pieces,” Nic Marsh, a researcher at the Peace Research Institute in Oslo, Norway who has worked on this issue since 2008 said in an email. Overton’s first attempts to gather information from the Pentagon about U.S.-financed exports of AK-47’s to Afghanistan, using the Freedom of Information Act, produced documents that he said were completely redacted.
KALISHNIKOV USA[USG procures its own AK47 factory just as US sanctions block purchases of Kalashnikovs from Russia.]
It’s clear that the Pentagon has not been eager to make the size of its small-arms exports as clear as it could. The Pentagon’s public announcements of contracts related to small arms exports to Iraq and Afghanistan, overseen by its press office, only list 19,602 of the 1.45 million small arms, or roughly 1 percent of the guns the department actually sent to Iraq and Afghanistan, the group’s report said. Of those publicly-disclosed contracts, a third were either mis-numbered or contained different information than versions of the same contracts that were listed in the Federal Procurement Database System, the report said.
When asked about the discrepancies, Mark Wright, a Pentagon spokesperson, responded in an email to the Center for Public Integrity that the two public accounts are based on different definitions, “which if not clearly understood, can lead to incorrect conclusions.”
Wright gave a slightly smaller overall tally: “We have a total of about 1.1 million weapons that DOD either provided or assisted in providing to Iraq and Afghanistan,” he said, noting that in some cases, individual contracts might have spelled out the maximum number of arms authorized to be shipped, rather than the number actually sent.
Overton said he stood by his larger tally, and that the team scoured their information for inaccuracies after carefully examining the differences between various databases.
Asked whether or not the Pentagon attempts to track where the guns it sells wind up, Wright responded that speed was “essential” in the early years of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. “As a result, lapses in accountability of some of the weapons transferred occurred,” Wright wrote in an emailed statement also provided to other reporters asking about the group’s report. He said that the department now “tracks the origin, shipping, and in-country distribution of all weapons” it exports to Iraq and Afghanistan.
But even if such measures are carried out with great care – an unlikely event in Afghanistan, given the documented low literacy rates among local security personnel there, they cannot prevent U.S. armaments from being seized by others on the battlefield. The United States is not the only country that provided weapons to Iraq and Afghani forces that went missing over the past fifteen years, and not the only one to have exported weapons that specifically ended up in the hands of terrorists. In 2014, the Center for Public Integrityreported that fighters associated with the Islamic State had acquired or seized weapons from at least 21 countries, including the United States, China, Russia, and several Balkan states.
“A significant percentage of these weapons will go into the environment and eventually end up in the hands of the Taliban, ISIS” and other non-state actors, says Ed Laurance, an expert on armed violence and professor of international policy and development at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey. “Ammunition comes in, it goes out. Terrorists can get it, civilians can get it…it’s impossible to keep track of [small arms]” because the environments are so insecure.








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Canada restores its traditional UN peacekeeping role

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The Canadian government is restoring the country's traditional U.N. peacekeeping role by providing up to 600 soldiers for missions around the world.
     

Past deadline, feds see no end in sight for veteran homeless crisis

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Federal agencies now say they cannot predict the end of homelessness among veterans, a national crisis that President Barack Obama hoped to stop by 2015.
     
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Coast Guard repatriates 161 Cuban migrants to island

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The Coast Guard said in a news release that 27 migrants were repatriated Friday, with 68 returned on Thursday and 66 on Monday. All were returned to the city of Bahia de Cabanas.
     

Mosul fight is already redrawing the map of northern Iraq

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The new de facto borders established by the Kurdish fighters raise the potential for conflict between Iraq's Kurds and Arabs after any eventual defeat of
Islamic State, just as in neighboring Syria, where Kurds have also dramatically expanded their zone of control.
     

In Syria, victory is in the eye of the beholder

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The contradictory narratives about what happened in Tokhar reveal the difficulty of determining outcomes in an air campaign that has taken place beyond the reach of journalists, aid groups and other independent observers.
     

Kurdish-led Syrian forces report Turkish air raids on bases

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Kurdish-led forces in northern Syria say Turkish airstrikes have hit their bases near Jarablus, a town seized by Turkey-backed rebels earlier this week.
     

A History of Modern Espionage 

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Title:                      History of Modern Espionage
Author:                 Allison Ind
Ind, Allison (1965). History of Modern Espionage. London: Hodder and Stoughton.
LCCN:    65005468

Subjects

Notes

  • Some material in this book is based on the book A Short History of Espionage. [New York: D. McKay Co. LCCN: 63011581]
Date Posted:      August 26, 2016
Reviewed by Paul W. Blackstock and Frank L. Schaf[1]
Colonel Allison Ind’s (Army of the United States, retired) A Short History of Espionage, is an abbreviated version of espionage history beginning in antiquity and continuing through the American Civil War, the Spanish American War, World War I, World War II, and through the postwar period to the Bay of Pigs in Cuba. lnd concentrates on appraisals of the methods of modern espionage in England, France, Germany, and the Soviet Union. His assessments of both espionage and counterespionage are vigorously expressed to provide valid analyses and he draws on his experiences as an intelligence specialist with the U.S. Army in the Far East from 1940 to 1961.
Ind produced an expanded version of A Short History of Espionage, the title of this review. This study includes new material dealing with a number of outstanding British and Western European cases.
[1] Blackstock, Paul W. (1978) and Frank L. Schaf, Jr. Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, And Covert Operations: A Guide to Information Sources. Detroit: Gale Research Co., pp. 140-141


 

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· ·

Unmanned 

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Title:                      Unmanned
Author:                William M. Arkin
Arkin, William M. (2015). UnmannedDronesData, And The Illusion of Perfect Warfare. New York: Little, Brown and Company
LCCN:    2015931408
UG1242.D7 A74 2015

Summary

  • “Unmanned is an in-depth examination of why seemingly successful wars never seem to end. The problem centers on drones, now accumulated in the thousands, the front end of a spying and killing machine that is disconnected from either security or safety. Drones, however, are only part of the problem. William Arkin shows that security is actually undermined by an impulse to gather as much data as possible, the appetite and the theory both skewed towards the notion that no amount is too much. And yet the very endeavor of putting fewer human in potential danger places everyone in greater danger. Wars officially end, but the Data Machine lives on forever. Throughout his career, Arkin has exposed powerful secrets of so-called national security and intelligence. Now he continues that tradition. The most alarming book about warfare in years, Unmanned is essential reading for anyone who cares about the future of mankind.”–Provided from Amazon.com.

Contents

  • Search of the wind — Dead reckoning — Fire and forget — Trojan spirit — Dialogue of the deaf — Another plane — Inherit the wind — My back is killing me — The machine builds — The split — The explosion — Flock of birds — Mind-set over mind — Gilgamesh calling — Beyond the speed of war — X-men — Ring of fiber — Command posts of the future — Oh. Obama was elected — Pattern of life — Warka — Epilogue: the event.

Subjects

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Unheard Voices And Invisible Faces Of Voter Suppression - Huffington Post

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Huffington Post

Unheard Voices And Invisible Faces Of Voter Suppression
Huffington Post
Goodlatte chairs the House Judiciary Committee, which has refused to hold hearings on legislation to combat egregiously discriminatory voting laws enacted post-Shelby. Throughout our six-hour, nonviolent demonstration, the thirty of us - young and old ...

'Less Than Human' - The Crime Report

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'Less Than Human'
The Crime Report
While I of course 'cherry-picked' this litany of deficiencies from the DOJ report's executive summary, they represent a fairly neutered echo of the similar findings that advocacy organizations—from the ACLU, to Human Rights Watch,Detention Watch ...

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Baltimore City Council to Hold Hearing on PD's Undisclosed Police Surveillance Program - Government Technology

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Government Technology

Baltimore City Council to Hold Hearing on PD's Undisclosed Police Surveillance Program
Government Technology
... months in secret is concerning. ... We must vet this program with the help of organizations like the ACLU and NAACP Legal Defense Fund to determine if there is a violation of people's constitutional rights. ... Scott said the oversight hearing ...
In Baltimore, the police and a private company are running surveillance flights like never beforeWashington Post
Look up: Police surveillance planes are probably flying over Baltimore right nowTechnical.ly Baltimore

Baltimore Police Say Aerial Surveillance Is Not a 'Secret Spy Program'CityLab

Bloomberg-American Civil Liberties Union-Los Angeles Times -Radiolab
all 104 
news articles »

Stingray documents offer rare insight into police and FBI surveillance - The Guardian

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The Guardian

Stingray documents offer rare insight into police and FBI surveillance
The Guardian
According to the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), at least 66 state and federal agencies are now known to use the devices, including the IRS, as well as dozens of state and local police departments. The FBI's statement in the Oakland case ...

Surveillance Program Raises Questions About Tech, Privacy - ABC News

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Baltimore Sun

Surveillance Program Raises Questions About Tech, Privacy
ABC News
Authorities instead signed a non-disclosure agreement with the FBI requiring officers to keep their use secret. In court, prosecutors agreed to drop cases rather than risk disclosure. "Before the government ... "This is yet another example of ...
Baltimore plans hearing over police surveillance planeWTOP
Baltimore

 City Council to Hold Hearing on PD's Undisclosed Police Surveillance ProgramGovernment Technology
In Baltimore, the police and a private company are running surveillance flights like never beforeWashington Post 

Technical.ly Baltimore-
 Bloomberg-American Civil Liberties Union-Los Angeles Times 
all 112
 Radiolab
all 106 news articles »

Why You Should Be Concerned About the DHS Plan to Collect Social Media Info on Travelers - AlterNet

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AlterNet

Why You Should Be Concerned About the DHS Plan to Collect Social Media Info on Travelers
AlterNet
This narrative quickly gained traction, though it was soon proven to be false, as acknowledged by FBI Director James B. Comey when he said two weeks after the attacks: “So far in this investigation we have found no evidence of the posting on social ...

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Vox Sentences: It's a bird! It's a plane! It's aerial surveillance of the entire city of Baltimore! - Vox

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Vox

Vox Sentences: It's a bird! It's a plane! It's aerial surveillance of the entire city of Baltimore!
Vox
report by Bloomberg Businessweek earlier this week revealed that since January, Baltimore police had used aerial surveillance technology developed for military use to secretly monitor the city. [Bloomberg Businessweek / Monte Reel]; This isn't the ...

FBI's massive porn sting puts internet privacy in crossfire - The Seattle Times

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FBI's massive porn sting puts internet privacy in crossfire
The Seattle Times
The FBI snared scores of people after taking over a child-pornography bulletin board and conducting a sting and computer-hacking operation. But there is a growing social and legal controversy over the bureau's tactics and the impact on internet privacy.

China's Potemkin Diplomacy - Forbes

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Forbes

China's Potemkin Diplomacy
Forbes
Following a string of foreign policy setbacks this summer, China was tantruming like a choleric child, throwing around its toy planes and boats, and firing missiles. But in what could be called Potemkin diplomacy, China is now whitewashing its foreign ...

Innocent Dallas couple gets unwelcome visit from FBI | khou.com - KHOU.com

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KHOU.com

Innocent Dallas couple gets unwelcome visit from FBI | khou.com
KHOU.com
DALLAS -- Donna and Walter Williams were asleep in their bed Tuesday morning when they were startled by a loud noise.

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FBI Profilers Help Hunt for Phoenix Serial Shooter Who Killed Seven - NBCNews.com

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NBCNews.com

FBI Profilers Help Hunt for Phoenix Serial Shooter Who Killed Seven
NBCNews.com
The FBI has dispatched its famed profilers to Phoenix to dig for clues to an elusive serial killer's identity and motivation. Agents from the Behavioral Analysis Unit — the inspiration for movies and TV shows like "Criminal Minds" — have visited the ...

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The FBI's Megaupload Domains Are Now Hosting Porn Ads - Techdirt

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TorrentFreak

The FBI's Megaupload Domains Are Now Hosting Porn Ads
Techdirt
Well, we know the FBI is particularly adept at hosting porn on the internet. After all, just a few days ago it was revealed that in the short time it was running a child porn site as a honeypot, it actually made the site run much faster. But now ...
FBI-Controlled Megaupload Domain Now Features Soft PornTorrentFreak

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Tech firm brags about blocking FBI from recovering Clinton emails - Washington Examiner (blog)

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Washington Examiner (blog)

Tech firm brags about blocking FBI from recovering Clinton emails
Washington Examiner (blog)
A technology company that provided the program Hillary Clinton's team used to scrub her private server of emails bragged on its website Thursday that it had prevented the FBI from accessing deleted records. BleachBit, the publicly-available application ...
Gowdy: FBI's Description Of Sidney Blumenthal-Hillary Clinton Relationship Will Come As A SurpriseDaily Caller
Gowdy: FBI barely asked Hillary about intent An error occurred.Hot Air
Gowdy: FBI barely probed Clinton about intent on emailsThe Hill 

Roll Call-KOMO News

 -American Spectator
all 660 news articles »

FBI Won't Pursue Hate Crime Charges in Scalding Water Attack - ABC News

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FBI Won't Pursue Hate Crime Charges in Scalding Water Attack
ABC News
The FBI has decided not to pursue hate crime charges against a Georgia man found guilty of throwing scalding water on a sleeping gay couple. Martin Blackwell was sentenced to 40 years in prison this week for aggravated assault and aggravated battery.

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FBI-owned Megaupload.org serves up porn and sex ads | Ars ... - Ars Technica

Running a 'fever': FBI and police Stingray surveillance partnership ... - RT

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RT

Running a 'fever': FBI and police Stingray surveillance partnership ...
RT
New documents show how Oakland police and the FBI collaborated in their use of surveillance devices known as “cell-site simulators” or Stingrays, without a ...
FBI's stingray quickly found suspect after local cops' device couldn't ...Ars Technica
Stingray documents offer rare insight into police and FBI ...The Guardian

all 4 news articles »

'Unprofessional': Porn now featured on FBI-seized Megaupload site - RT

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RT

'Unprofessional': Porn now featured on FBI-seized Megaupload site
RT
Since a criminal investigation was launched against New Zealander Kim Dotcom, who is still wanted in the US, the FBI took control of some of the company's assets as well as Megaupload's former domain names, including Megastuff.co, Megaclicks.org, ...
FBI-owned Megaupload.org serves up porn and sex adsArs Technica
FBI-Controlled Megaupload Domain Now Features Soft PornTorrentFreak

all 5 news articles »

Still no US-Russia deal on better cooperation in Syria

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August 27, 2016, 11:11 AM (IDT)
After 10 hours of off-and-on again talks in Geneva, US Secretary of State and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov were unable to reach a comprehensive agreement on topping up their cooperation for ending the brutal Syrian war – only on a number of issues standing in the way of restoring a nationwide truce to Syria and opening up aid deliveries. DEBKAfile: Incomplete US-Russian cooperation exacerbates to the risk of collision between US, Russian and Syrian warplanes in the sky.
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US-Syrian warplanes nose to nose over US-backed Kurdish positions

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August 27, 2016, 11:26 AM (IDT)
Two American pilots described Friday how they scrambled against Syrian bombers and fighter jets that were attacking Kurdish and rebel positions to which US personnel are attached. They reported that, when the Syrian pilots realized they were locked on US radar, they bolted. The US pilots did not say when or where the incident occurred. “We made our point,” was the only comment coming from Brig. Gen. Charles Corcoran, commander of the 380th Air Expeditionary, Wing who is in charge of US air operations in Syria and Iraq.
DEBKAfile: The American pilots’ account of the incident was published as another warning to the Syrian air force that its planes would be shot down if any more attacks were staged on areas where US special operations forces are serving. 

Cairo severs ties with Hamas for refusing to hand over ISIS associates

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August 27, 2016, 11:44 AM (IDT)
Egypt Saturday broke off ties with the Gaza Strip after its Hamas rulers refused to arrest Palestinian and Egyptian individuals suspected by Egyptian intelligence of serving the Islamic State organization in Sinai, Saudi sources disclose. Hamas also denied Cairo information about the four Hamas members who crossed into Sinai last year to join ISIS. DEBKAfile adds that the four terrorists were entrusted by the Hamas military arm Ezz e-din al-Qassam with aiding the Islamic State’s fight against the Egyptian army.
Hamas official, Mahmoud Az-Zahar, admitted that communications with Cairo had been halted, saying: “We do not play this game. Things have stopped there.”
Egypt obviously does not buy Israel’s official contention that Hamas is pursuing Salafi elements linked to ISIS-Sinai which was offered after they fired another rocket into Israel last week.

How A Looming Fiscal Crisis Could Doom America's Military Edge - The National Interest Online (blog)

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The National Interest Online (blog)

How A Looming Fiscal Crisis Could Doom America's Military Edge
The National Interest Online (blog)
The problem with defense professionals is that defense is all they think about. Other than spending time with the family and catching a football game on the weekend, they're all about war. So things that impinge on their profession from outside the ...

Apologetic Hacker? Not if You Peek at His Emails - New York Times

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New York Daily News

Apologetic Hacker? Not if You Peek at His Emails
New York Times
And they say the emails that the Bahamian man sent from jail since his arrest in December portray him as anything but a repentant hacker. Photo. Photo. Photo. In messages to several women, the government said, Mr. Knowles, 24, seemed to be fixated on ...
Bumbling hacker in celebrity data leaks vows to strike againNew York Daily News

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China's Oil Production Begins Long Descent, Beijing Scrambles For Answers - Forbes

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Forbes

China's Oil Production Begins Long Descent, Beijing Scrambles For Answers
Forbes
From searching the globe in search of oil deals with intense geopolitical ramifications like Sudan, Niger, Iraq and Venezuela, to cutting a controversial multi-billion dollar oil deal in Canada's oil sands play, China has become all things to all ...

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President's Daily Brief: Delivering Intelligence to Nixon and Ford

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Publication: Posted new publication, President's Daily Brief: Delivering Intelligence to Nixon and Ford.
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Over 2000 Documents Released By CIA Containing Intelligence Analysis of Yom Kippur War - JP Updates

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JP Updates

Over 2000 Documents Released By CIA Containing Intelligence Analysis of Yom Kippur War
JP Updates
Around 2,500 documents were released by the CIA Wednesday, containing intelligence analysis by the U.S. government on major national security issues during the presidencies of Gerald Ford and Richard Nixon. The U.S. intelligence assessments in the ...

CIA reveals its secret briefings to Presidents Nixon and Ford - CNN

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CNN

CIA reveals its secret briefings to Presidents Nixon and Ford
CNN
Only in recent years did the CIA revise its traditional stance, releasing in September all of the daily, classified newsletters it had produced for Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson. And on Wednesday, the releases continued, with the ...
CIA declassifies thousands of Nixon, Ford daily intel briefingswtkr.com
CIA releases thousands of previously classified briefings to Presidents Nixon and FordLos Angeles Times
CIA Releases Nixon and Ford's Intelligence BriefsNBCNews.comOCRegisterVoice of America -Jerusalem Post Israel News
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Морская пехота КФл в рамках внезапной проверки провела учения по уничтожению НВФ

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Также были отработаны вопросы организации взаимодействия подразделений морской пехоты КФл с территориальными органами МВД и ФСБ России на маршрутах выдвижения при совершении марша и в ходе операции по уничтожению условных НВФ.

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