Tuesday, October 13, 2015

Headlines: Carter says U.S. will sail, fly and operate wherever international law allows | Reuters | Taliban Withdraw From Kunduz After Days of Fighting - NYTimes.com | Intervention in Syria: Russia Gambles Big Time | Rocket Attack Hits Russian Embassy in Syria



10.12.15



Current Topics Review
syria news - Google News | syria war - Google News | syria russia - Google News | obama - Google News
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Best of Bunga Bunga: 7 most outrageous lines from Silvio Berlusconi's new biography by Nick Squires

Best of Bunga Bunga: 7 most outrageous lines from Silvio Berlusconi's new biography 

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Highlights from Silvio Berlusconi's new biography, from the origins of 'bunga bunga' to David Cameron's joke about "jacuzzis and call girls"











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US Navy readies patrols near man-made Chinese islands - Los Angeles Times

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The Straits Times

US Navy readies patrols near man-made Chinese islands
Los Angeles Times
The Obama administration will soon order Navy warships to patrol near man-made islands constructed by China in the South China Sea, a U.S. warning that it will not accept Beijing's vast territorial claims in the heavily traveled waters, officials said.
What Lies in the South China SeaWall Street Journal
The U.S. Must Call Out China For Its AggressionDaily Caller
US discusses South China Sea plans with AustraliaReuters
New York Times -Reuters Canada
all 142 news articles »

Donald Trump's facts about America mostly false, says study

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Donald Trump draws support from voters who see him as a "straight talking guy". But only a fraction of what he says is actually true, a study finds











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ICC prosecutor to investigate Russia, Georgia over 2008 conflict

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AMSTERDAM (Reuters) - The prosecutor of the International Criminal Court said on Tuesday she intended to investigate Georgian and Russian forces over possible war crimes committed during a 2008 conflict over the breakaway Georgian province of South Ossetia.









  

Carter says U.S. will sail, fly and operate wherever international law allows

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BOSTON (Reuters) - In a clear rebuff to China, U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter said on Tuesday that the United States military would sail and fly wherever international law allowed, including the South China Sea.
  

Coalition Spokesman: Now Time for Push into Ramadi

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The time is right for Iraqi forces to make a “final push” to reclaim Ramadi from Islamic State fighters, according to the spokesman for the U.S.-led coalition fighting the militant group. Iraqi security forces squeezed tighter around Anbar’s provincial capital, advancing 15 kilometers in the last week after months of slowed fighting due to a brutally hot Iraqi summer and the religious observances of Ramadan and the hajj, Col. Steve Warren told reporters via teleconference from Baghdad....

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Vladimir Putin condemns US for refusing to share Syria terror targets 

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Russian presidents says West is stonewalling requests for help on Syrian terrorist targets and failing to grasp the basic facts on the ground











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Witness the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict On the Ground

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Clashes broke out between Israeli forces and Palestinian protesters in Jerusalem last month. Since then, the riots have spread to the West Bank and the Gaza Strip, and the violence has escalated with each week. Tensions are high, and peace prospects between the two sides appear to have hit a new nadir. Watch the video above to see the conflict on the ground.

Exclusive: Jeb Bush says Putin's Russia should face consequences over Syria

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PETERBOROUGH, N.H. (Reuters) - Republican Jeb Bush vowed on Tuesday to take a more aggressive approach to countering Russia if he is elected president next year, calling Vladimir Putin an "agile adversary" who is exploiting a vacuum of U.S. leadership in Syria and elsewhere.
  

ICC to investigate Russia-Georgia war

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The International Criminal Court (ICC) prosecutor says she will investigate Russian and Georgian forces over possible war crimes in the 2008 conflict.

Dutch MH17 Investigation Leaves Unanswered Questions

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From: VOAvideo
Duration: 02:04

Dutch officials say it was a Russian-made surface-to-air missile that brought down Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 killing all 298 people aboard last year as it flew over eastern Ukraine, where fighting was underway between Russian-backed rebels and Ukrainian forces. The conclusion came in a final report on the investigation released at an air base in the Netherlands on Tuesday. VOA Europe Correspondent Luis Ramirez reports.
Originally published at - http://www.voanews.com/media/video/dutch-mh17-probe-leaves-unanswered-questions/3004308.html

Russian Airstrikes Hit Rebel-Held Syrian Towns

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From: WSJDigitalNetwork
Duration: 00:44

Russian airstrikes hit rebel-held towns in Hama on Oct. 12, as opposition and government forces battled on the ground.
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Joe Lieberman: Bernie Sanders has redefined socialism

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From: FoxNewsChannel
Duration: 05:06

Former senator breaks down 2016 candidate's surprising popularity on 'The Real Story'
Watch Gretchen Carlson talk about Apple News, Democrats, Elections, and Presidential Primaries on The Real Story.

MH17 hit by Russian-made missile | DW News

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From: deutschewelleenglish
Duration: 02:09

A Dutch investigation has found that Malaysian Airlines flight MH17 was shot down by a missile over rebel-held Ukraine. The findings of the long-awaited report suggest the plane was brought down by a Russian-made BUK surface-to-air missile system.

Security video shows deadly attack in Jerusalem

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From: ReutersVideo
Duration: 01:25

Police security camera video shows a Palestinian man ramming his car into a group of Israelis waiting at a bus stop in a Jewish neighborhood, and then attacking them with a cleaver. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).
Subscribe: http://smarturl.it/reuterssubscribe
More updates and breaking news: http://smarturl.it/BreakingNews
Reuters tells the world's stories like no one else. As the largest international multimedia news provider, Reuters provides coverage around the globe and across topics including business, financial, national, and international news. For over 160 years, Reuters has maintained its reputation for speed, accuracy, and impact while providing exclusives, incisive commentary and forward-looking analysis.

White House says Obama not trying to influence FBI probe of Hillary Clinton's ... - Washington Times

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Washington Times

White House says Obama not trying to influence FBI probe of Hillary Clinton's ...
Washington Times
The White House said Tuesday that President Obama wasn't trying to influence an FBIinvestigation into Hillary Rodham Clinton's private email server when he declared that Mrs. Clinton hadn't harmed national security. “Of course not,” White House press ...

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Syrian Insurgents Shell Russian Embassy During Pro-Russia Rally - Huffington Post

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Huffington Post

Syrian Insurgents Shell Russian Embassy During Pro-Russia Rally
Huffington Post
Insurgents have vowed to fight Russian forces after Moscow began launching airstrikes in Syria late last month. Russia has been one of Assad's strongest supporters since the start of the uprising in 2011. The civil war has killed more than 250,000 ...
Mortar Shells Strike Near Russian Embassy in SyriaNew York Times
Russian embassy in Syria shelled during rallyAl Jazeera America 
Russian embassy in Syria shelledCBS News


all 484 news articles »

Russia's Muslims on edge over air strikes on Syria - Financial Times

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Financial Times

Russia's Muslims on edge over air strikes on Syria
Financial Times
“Seeing Russia support this murderer just enrages them.” Mr Charinsky, who runs a non-profit group called “For Muslims' Rights", is not alone. Russian social media have been bristling with criticism of the country's air strikes in Syria, which ...

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Russia abandons hope of oil price recovery and turns to the plough - Telegraph.co.uk

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Telegraph.co.uk

Russia abandons hope of oil price recovery and turns to the plough
Telegraph.co.uk
Igor Sechin, chairman of Russia's oil giant Rosneft, accused the government of turning its back on the energy industry, lamenting that his company is being throttled by high taxes. He warned that the Russia oil sector will slowly shrivel unless there ...

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Despite Airstrikes, Is Russia Still Working Toward Political Solution in Syria? - U.S. News & World Report

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U.S. News & World Report

Despite Airstrikes, Is Russia Still Working Toward Political Solution in Syria?
U.S. News & World Report
In recent days, it has become apparent that Russia, while continuing its air campaign against the Islamic State (IS) and Jabhat al-Nusra positions in Syria, is paying attention to the search for a political solution to the Syrian crisis. Some analysts ...
Top China paper says US, Russia playing Cold War game in SyriaReuters
UK 'should enforce Syria no-fly zone even if Russia vetoes UN resolution'The Guardian

all 174 news articles »

The Guardian view on Europe and Belarus: engage without illusion | Editorial 

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The re-election of Alexander Lukashenko was a sham. Any dialogue with him must come with clear conditions attached
Svetlana Alexievich, who won this year’s Nobel literature prize, knows a thing or two about the Soviet and the post-Soviet mind. In her books, she has beautifully explored the words, anxieties, hopes and life experience of those who lived under the communist dictatorship and then saw the end of the USSR. She also stands out as the most powerful voice today relaying the democratic aspirations of Belarus, the country where she grew up – a society that remains in the grip of Europe’s last autocrat, Alexander Lukashenko.
This was not just a wise Nobel prize, but a timely one. It came just days before Mr Lukashenko, who has been in power for over two decades, sought a fifth presidential mandate for himself. Quasi-Soviet official results were announced on Monday, handing him 83% of votes. Meanwhile, street demonstrations broke out in the capital, Minsk, in protest against what all independent observers describe as a fraudulent electoral process.
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Flight MH17: Dutch safety report cites Buk missile and vital missing evidence 

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279-page report rules out many possibilities and is precise on cause of crash naming warhead model
The 279-page Dutch safety report, and its appendices, covers the flight of MH17 from take-off from Amsterdam on 17 July 2014 through the moment it disappeared from radar screens over eastern Ukraine, to the recovery and forensic analysis of the wreckage and the human remains.
Much of the text is dedicated to ruling out options for the loss of the aircraft – such as catastrophic malfunction, an air-to-air missile or other more exotic possibilities such as a meteorite strike – but it is more precise than many had predicted on the actual cause of the plane’s destruction, even naming the model of Buk warhead the Dutch safety board believes was involved.
The aeroplane was struck by a 9N314M warhead as carried on a 9M38-series missile and launched by a Buk surface-to-air missile system. This conclusion is based on the combination of the following: the recorded sound peak, the damage pattern found on the wreckage caused by the blast and the impact of the fragments, the bow-tie and cubic shaped fragments found in the cockpit and in the bodies of the crew members in the cockpit, the injuries sustained by three crew members in the cockpit, the analysis of the in-flight break-up, the analysis of the explosive residues and paint found and the size and distinct, bow-tie, shape of some of the fragments.
In the international system of responsibilities, the sovereign state bears sole responsibility for the safety of the airspace.
It should be noted that many pieces of the wreckage were not physically examined by the Dutch Safety Board until four months after the crash. During this period some parts were removed, therefore it was not possible to retrieve all wreckage pieces. Wherever possible, the photographs taken immediately after the crash were used in conjuction with the wreckage found.
The impact was entirely unexpected, which means that people were barely able to comprehend the situation in which they found themselves. There was hardly any time for a conscious response. The occupants were exposed to extreme factors almost immediately. Depending on variables such as the occupant’s location in the cabin at the moment of impact, the factors were not the same for all the occupants. A number of occupants immediately sustained severe injuries as a result of the factors, probably causing death. For others, the exposure caused reduced awareness or unconsciousness within moments. It could not be ascertained at which exact moment occupants died, but it is certain that the impact on the ground was not survivable. 
The Russian Federation did not provide the radar data stating that no radar data was saved, but instead provided the radar screen video replay, which showed combined surveillance primary and secondary radar. In the absence of the underlying radar data (so-called raw data), the video information could not be verified
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Why Russia's Alternate History of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 Matters - New York Times

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New York Times

Why Russia's Alternate History of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 Matters
New York Times
The report didn't tell us anything we didn't already know or strongly suspect: that the cause of the crash was a Russian-made missile fired from an area hotly contested between Russian-backed separatists and the Ukrainian military, killing hundreds of ...
Ukraine calls for criminal investigation after report finds Russian missile ...Fox News
Russia Says That Conclusions on Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 Crash Are 'Biased'VICE News
Whoever shot down flight MH17, Russia's reputation is in tattersThe Guardian
Washington Post -Huffington Post -Sky News
all 2,133 news articles »

Today's Headlines and Commentary

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Still reeling from Saturday’s twin suicide bombings which left at least 95 dead, Turkey has seen no respite from the intense political polarization that has recently gripped the country. The Times takes a look at the Turkish reaction to the deadly attacks and notes that “within hours of the attack on Saturday outside the train station in Ankara, the capital, where two suicide bombers killed nearly 100 people, political leaders engaged in more bickering than consolation, and angry citizens began protesting against the government.”
Turkish officials now say they have “concrete evidence” of ISIS involvement in the attacks in Ankara, the Guardian writesGovernment officials have dismissed accusations of negligence in failing to prevent the bombings, defending the security provisions that had been in place for the peace rally.  
Bloomberg tells us that, though the Turkish government has endorsed the PKK’s unilateral ceasefire as an “important step,” officials insist that the move is insufficient to end the conflict between government and PKK forces. And Reuters reports that Turkish officials, made nervous by recent Kurdish military successes in northwestern Syria, have asked countries backing Kurdish forces to hold back from supporting further territorial advances along the Turkey-Syria border.
And which countries might be supporting the Kurds, according to Turkey? The United States and... Russia. Yes, you read that correctly: Turkish officials claim that the Kremlin has been providing backing to Kurdish fighters in the Syrian northwest.
The network of alliances in Syria grows more complicated by the hour. For those keeping track,theSyrian war now involves 4 of the P5 countries, one NATO ally, Israel, Iraq, Jordan, Hezbollah, Iran, Kurdish militants, Al Qaeda, ISIS fighters, and militants from around the world.
Meanwhile, the United States has airdropped 45 tons of ammunition to a rebel coalition fighting ISIS in northeast Syria, the BBC writes. The ammunition will be used by an alliance of Syrian Arab and Kurdish fighters to launch an assault on the ISIS-held city of Raqqa, which Reuters suggests will likely begin within weeks.
Reuters also reports on the new alliance between the Kurdish YPG (or People's Protection Units) and Syrian Arab groups, which may “deflect criticism that [the Kurdish group] fights only on behalf of Kurds”especially in the wake of accusations by Amnesty International that the YPG has committed war crimes by displacing thousands of non-Kurdish civilians and demolishing houses in areas recaptured from ISIS. Voice of America has the story.
As U.S.-backed Syrian rebels continue to stave off the Russia-backed Syrian government forces, theTimes writes that the conflict is quickly turning into a proxy war. One rebel referred to the supply of arms from the CIA as essentially “carte blanche”: “We can get as much as we need and whenever we need them.” Rebel factions have increasingly relied on U.S. anti-tank missiles in their fight against the Syrian military.
The Journal writes that Russian airstrikes are causing formerly fractious Syrian rebel groups to pull together, perhaps “offering another shot at a more unified front against the Assad regime and its Russian and Iranian allies.” As contempt for Russian involvement grows among rebel groups, the al Nusra Front’s leader, Abu Mohammed al-Jolani, has called for revenge attacks on Russia both within and outside of Syria. Jolani also placed a bounty of $3.4 million on Bashar al Assad, the Post tells us.
Confirming Russia’s long-suspected intentions, President Vladimir Putin has acknowledged the Kremlin’s intention to prop up the regime of Syrian president Bashar al Assad, saying that “[the Russian] task is to stabilize the legitimate government and to create conditions for a political compromise ... by military means.” The Hill notes the contrast with previous Kremlin assurances that Russia’s activities were aimed strictly against terrorist groups. In his remarks, Putin also jabbed at the Pentagon’s failed train and equip program, suggesting that, given the same $500 million, “[Russia] would have spent it better.”
During a pro-government gathering in Damascus thanking Russia for its military intervention on behalf of the Assad regime, insurgents fired two shells at the Russian embassy, theTimes tells us.  No one was hurt in the attack.
The Times reports on the suspected terror cell that the FSB claims to have discovered in Moscow, after arresting several people who had allegedly trained in ISIS camps in Syria. FSB officers also reportedly discovered an IED with over 10 pounds of explosives in the suspects’ apartment, though some social media users have expressed skepticism over the “foiled plot.”
Politico examines the rift that has arisen within the Obama administration’s foreign policy team following Putin’s intervention in Syria. Pushing back against the president’s weariness toward increased U.S. engagement, some officials have argued for bolder U.S. action in Syria, suggesting that the United States looks weak by not responding decisively to Russia’s provocations. Yet their arguments appear to have had little effect on the U.S. policy.
Military Times reports that, as part of DOD’s overhaul of its much-maligned train-and-equip program in Syria,the Pentagon “will markedly scale back the rigorous screening and vetting process designed to ensure the rebels do not have links to terrorists or extremist groups.” In contrast to their last attempt in this respect, the Pentagon will continue to vet leaders of groups “with little or no scrutiny of rank-and-file fighters.” Officials suggest that the new plan will allow greater flexibility in U.S. efforts.
According to the Pentagon, the U.S.-led air campaign against the Islamic State has successfully killed an estimated 20,000 militants. Yet USA Today notes that the group continues to draw fighters, and quotes Brookings’ Michael O’Hanlon as saying that the war against ISIS is all but “stalemated — in both Iraq and Syria.”
Iraq has announced the “launch of the second phase of a large-scale military operation to drive Islamic State militants out of the central Salahuddin province, the AP writes. This phase will follow months of stalled U.S. and Iraqi anti-ISIS efforts following their April recapture of Tikrit, the province’s capital.
The increase in violence in Israel shows no sign of ebbing. The Post reports on the “Day of Rage”declared by Palestinian groups, which has led to numerous Palestinian stabbing attacks and the deaths of three Israeli civilians. One attack, in which two Palestinian men boarded a bus and proceeded to shoot and stab passengers, recalled similar assaults aboard buses that characterized the Second Intifada. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has promised “aggressive measures” to calm the situation. The Times has more.
Earlier today, theTaliban officially announced that they have completely withdrawn from the city of Kunduz. While Taliban militants only held the city for 15 days, during that time the group was able todestroy government offices and facilities, kill local opponents, and free allied prisoners. More importantly, it reestablished itself as a force to be reckoned with, retaking its first city in fourteen years and undermining hopes that the Afghan security forces would be able to defend the country’s most important cities on their own.
Even as the Afghan security forces consolidate control over Kunduz, the Guardian reportsthatTaliban insurgents threatened to storm Ghazni, another provincial capital south of Kabul. Afghan security forces successfully repelled the attack, but the provincial governor told the AFP that the Taliban had attacked with 2,000 fighters and that the “assault left the streets of Ghazni deserted.”
According to theNew York Times, though, the Taliban may not be the only militant group advancing in the country: theIslamic State is also making inroads in its own battles against the Taliban in Afghanistan’s eastern Nangarhar Province. Why? The answer is simple: The Islamic State is flush with cash, allowing it to pick off Taliban fighters with a signing bonus of $500 dollars. The group is consolidating control with the same cruelty it has displayed elsewhere, rounding up and executing tribal elders and anyone associated with the Afghan government. A provincial deputy director for the Refugees and Repatriation Ministry said that more than 17,000 families in Nangarhar have been displaced by ISIS’s expanding violence.
Elsewhere in the country, U.S. airstrikes covered Afghan ground forces as they destroyed an al Qaeda sanctuary and training camp in southern Afghanistan.CNN shares that the five-day mission is one of the largest joint operations the two countries have undertaken.
In light of the rising chaos on the ground in Afghanistan, thePost’s Greg Jaffe provides today’s long read on President Obama’s fading hopes of bringing the troops home before he departs from the White House.
The Times reports that earlier this morning, the Iranian Parliament endorsed the nuclear deal negotiated between Iran and the P5+1 in July. The fate of the deal is now in the hands of the 12-member Guardian Council, which has the option to send the agreement back to Parliament for “further evaluation.” An Iranian state news agency reports that during debate on the vote, a scuffle took place between a hard-line opponent of the deal and one of the agreement’s supporters, prompting Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif to leave the building. Another eye-catching development: “Other hard-line representatives were seen crying after the approval of the agreement, which passed with 161 votes in favor, 59 against and 13 abstentions.” It seems the U.S. Congress is not the only representative body prone to drama.
Even as the nuclear deal sailed through Iran’s parliament, the Hill writes(citing a "senior administration official") that the Obama administration now believes that an Iranian missile test over the weekend likely violated a 2010 United Nations resolution meant to limit the country’s ability to test and deploy advanced weapons systems. The issue has yet to be referred to the United Nations Security Council, and U.S. officials insisted that the ballistic missile launch was beyond the purview of the nuclear agreement.
A Dutch investigation into the crash of Malaysian Airlines Flight MH17, which crashed in Ukraine in 2014, has concluded that the aircraft was likely hit by a Russian-made BUK missile. While the report does not attribute blame for the missile launch, but the Times notes that the findings “appear consistent” with the theory that the plane was shot down by Russian-backed separatists. TheTimes’ story includes a 20-minute video from the Dutch Safety Board explaining their findings.
The Times reports that the United States’ Pacific allies have expressed mixed opinions regarding the Obama administration’s intentions to carry out Freedom of Navigation patrols near artificial islands built by China in the South China Sea. The Philippines has openly supported the patrols, while new Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull has expressed caution.  For its part, Singapore said it “does no good for the region if there are incidents.” Though the United States has yet to announce when it will carry out the patrols, the administration has recently taken to briefing allies in the region, signalling that they could occur anytime.
The AP carries more news on Hillary Clinton’s secret email server, this time noting that the server was connected to the Internet in a way that allowed users to control it remotely. Experts have argued that the remote desktop service was not intended for such use without additional protective measures, potentially opening up the former Secretary of State to more criticism that her personal email server created security risks for the classified and confidential information she handled while in office.
Moscow’s recent incursions into Ukraine and Syria have boosted its incentive to tighten relationships with what theHill calls “cyber gangs,” creating “some of the most sophisticated hacking teams in the world.” In exchange for their cooperation in spying and writing malware code, the Russian government often turns a blind eye to a group's’ activity on the dark web.
new report in the Wall Street Journal highlights some of the risks identified by law enforcement relating to encrypted smartphones. Law enforcement officials share that in recent months they have been unable to unlock the phones of two homicide victims, undermining their ability to know who the victim communicated with in their final hours. Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance says that he has encountered 101 iPhones that his office could not unlock as of the end of August. The revelations may be the first volley by local prosecutors and law enforcement as the debate about going dark trickles down from the Federal to the local level, where small law enforcement offices often lack the capabilities of their national counterparts.
Now for some news from down under: As of today, Australian telecommunications companies are required to retain certain metadata on their servers for two years. Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, who championed the policy during his time as communications minister, endorsed the new measure as “critical” to the work of law enforcement and intelligence agencies. But the BBC reports that civil liberties advocates—including, via Twitter, Edward Snowdenare up in arms over what they see as a potential invasion of privacy.
The ACLU has filed a lawsuit against the two psychologists who played a major role in designing the CIA’s interrogation program, largely on the basis of information revealed in the “torture report” released by the Senate Intelligence Committee last year. The suit, which accuses the psychologists of human rights violations, is on behalf of two detainees who say they were tortured in CIA custody and one whose death has been attributed to harsh treatment at the hands of the CIA. Politico has thestory.
Parting shot: This evening at 8:30 pm EST, CNN will hold the first democratic primary debate for the 2016 presidential campaign. Foreign Policy weighs in with a helpful guide on issues to keep your eye on, including TPP and a possible no-fly zone over Syria.
ICYMI: Yesterday, on Lawfare
Ben announced a new series of book events Lawfare will be running with the Hoover Institution here in Washington, D.C. The first event is October 21st and will feature Will McCants and Joby Warrick.RSVP today.
Francesca Procaccini brought us the other big encryption news last week: a district judge in New York deferred ruling on the government’s petition for an order that would force Apple to disable security on an Apple device, and signalled he did not think the government has legal authority to make such an order.
In light of recent recommendations for reconciling U.S. and E.U. data privacy policies, Peter Margulies pushed back on the idea that the United States should drop to “conduct of foreign affairs of the United States” provision in the FISA Amendments Act.
Herb Lin broke down the confusing rhetoric in the encryption debate, in which opponents often use the same language but mean very different things.
Cody notified us that the 25th Annual Review of the Field of National Security Law will be held from November 5-6, 2015. RSVP.
Email the Roundup Team noteworthy law and security-related articles to include, and follow us onTwitter and Facebook for additional commentary on these issues. Sign up to receive Lawfarein your inbox. Visit our Events Calendar to learn about upcoming national security events, and check out relevant job openings on our Job Board.
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'There Is No Other Way': How A Siberian Village Survives On The Forest 

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From: rferlonline
Duration: 03:20

In the remote wilderness of western Siberia, life can be harsh with little opportunity for employment. So in the village of Komsomolsk in the Tomsk region, locals are turning to the vast woodlands and swamps to find a source of sustenance and income. (RFE/RL's Current Time TV)

Putin Says Russian Economy Stabilizing 

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President Vladimir Putin on Tuesday strove to deliver a positive message on the economy, even as output continues to shrink.

Iraq using info from new intelligence center to bomb Islamic State: official

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BAGHDAD (Reuters) - Iraq has begun bombing Islamic State insurgents with help from a new intelligence center with staff from Russia, Iran and Syria, a senior parliamentary figure said on Tuesday about cooperation seen as a threat to U.S. interests in the region.
  

White House says Iran's missile test may have violated U.N. resolution

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) - White House spokesman Josh Earnest said on Tuesday that there are "strong indications" that Iran's test of a new precision-guided ballistic missile on Sunday violated a U.N. Security Council resolution.
  

Islamic State confirms senior member killed in August strike: SITE

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BEIRUT (Reuters) - The hardline Islamic State group confirmed on Tuesday that one of its senior members had been killed in an airstrike in Iraq earlier this year, the SITE monitoring service said.
  

'There Is No Other Way': How A Siberian Village Survives On The Forest

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In the remote wilderness of western Siberia, life can be harsh with little opportunity for employment. So in the village of Komsomolsk in the Tomsk region, locals are turning to the vast woodlands and swamps to find a source of sustenance and income. (RFE/RL's Current Time TV)

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Islamic State urges jihad against Russians, Americans: audio

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BEIRUT (Reuters) - The hardline Islamic State group called on Muslims to launch a "holy war" against Russians and Americans over what it called their "crusaders' war" in the Middle East, according to an audio message distributed by their supporters on Tuesday.









  

Putin Complains About U.S. Cooperation on Syria

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President Vladimir V. Putin said some of Russia’s partners in Syria had “mush for brains” for failing to go along with all that Russia wanted to do.

Top U.S. general to visit Israel as defence aid talks expected to resume

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JERUSALEM (Reuters) - The top U.S. military officer will visit Israel next week, Israel's military said on Tuesday, as the two nations prepare to resume talks on defence aid that Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu had suspended in protest at the Iran nuclear deal.
  

White House: `Strong Indications' Iran Missile Test Violated U.N. Resolution

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The White House said Tuesday that initial reports show “strong indications” Iran violated United Nations Security Council resolutions with its ballistic missile test over the weekend.

U.S., Russia jets came within visual range over Syria - U.S. military 

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From: ReutersVideo
Duration: 01:32

U.S. Army Colonel Steve Warren calls the Russian air strikes in Syria, "reckless, indiscriminate and irresponsible." Rough Cut (no reporter narration).
Reuters tells the world's stories like no one else. As the largest international multimedia news provider, Reuters provides coverage around the globe and across topics including business, financial, national, and international news. For over 160 years, Reuters has maintained its reputation for speed, accuracy, and impact while providing exclusives, incisive commentary and forward-looking analysis.

Amateur footage: Russian jets reportedly under fire in Syria

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From: itnnews
Duration: 01:02

Amateur footage posted on social media reportedly shows Russian war jets coming under fire in the city of Latakia in Syria. Report by Grace Dean.
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Whoever shot down flight MH17, Russia’s reputation is in tatters | Mary Dejevsky 

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We still don’t know for sure who caused the Malaysia Airlines catastrophe in Ukraine, but it has been costly for both the Kremlin and the rebels
If any one event defines the confusion and savagery of the Ukrainian conflict for much of the world, it is the downing of Malaysia Airlines flight MH17, on 17 July, 2014. There was the shock and the grief at the loss of 298 people on a commercial airliner that had nothing whatsoever to do with the war on the ground; there was the disorderly and at times sacrilegious treatment of the crash site; and there were the bitter recriminations about blame.
The Dutch investigation, which appears to have been impeccable in every way, has confirmed what the vast majority of people already thought they knew: that the plane was brought down over the war zone by a Russian-made Buk surface-to-air missile. The report also expressed criticism, both of the Ukrainian authorities and of commercial airline practice.
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Largest Syrian al-Qaida group calls for terror attacks in Russia

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Leader of Jabhat al-Nusra makes demand in response to Moscow’s intervention on behalf of Assad regime, also calling for increased strikes on Alawite villages
The Syrian war’s largest al-Qaida group, Jabhat al-Nusra, has called for terror attacks in Russia, while also urging strikes on Alawite villages and placing bounties on the heads of Bashar al-Assad and the Hezbollah leader, Hassan Nasrallah.
The threats from the group’s leader, Abu Mohammed al-Jolani, were made on Tuesday in a taped call to arms that condemned the Russian intervention in the conflict, which began a fortnight ago. Jolani’s comments signal another escalation in the four-year war, in which his forces have becomeincreasingly prominent.
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The MH17 report – a guide to the flight's final moments 

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Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 left Amsterdam Schiphol airport at 10.30am GMT on 17 July 2014 bound for Kuala Lumpur, carrying 298 passengers and crew. It was shot down by a surface-to-air missile near Grabovo, Ukraine, at 1.20pm GMT.
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US 'will not press for Farc extraditions'

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The US says it will leave it up to Colombia how to deal with left-wing Farc rebels who have committed crimes, and will not push for their extradition.

Taliban admit Kunduz withdrawal

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The Afghan Taliban say that they have withdrawn from the strategic city of Kunduz, amid fresh fighting in Ghazni province, further south.

Dutch Safety Board confirms MH17 downed by missile

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From: PBSNewsHour
Duration: 03:38

In a clip from a video released from the Dutch Safety Board, forensics are explained that detail how investigators linked a surface-to-air missile to the downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 in July 2014.
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Press Briefing by Press Secretary Josh Earnest 

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From: whitehouse
Duration: 00:00

Live from the White House.

Kurdish forces in Syria 'will attack Islamic State's Raqqa within weeks' 

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Span Hamo, head of the Syrian Kurdish YPG militia, says contacts are under way the US-led military coalition











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Shells Hit Russian Embassy Grounds in Damascus

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Artillery shells hit the Russian Embassy grounds in Damascus after Moscow stepped up a bombing campaign in support of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.

The many holy wars ripping Syria apart 

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Russia's Syrian war is inflaming sectarian tensions















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Daniel Craig Drops Bond Role to See Landmines in Cyprus

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His James Bond character might blow things up and kill for a living, but actor Daniel Craig was in Cyprus on Tuesday to see first hand the perils of unexploded ordnance littering the ethnically-split island. Craig, whose new Bond movie Spectre comes out later this month, spent two days in Cyprus as part of his U.N.-mandated role as global advocate against the use of landmines and explosives. A 180-kilometer (115-mile)cease-fire line slicing through Cyprus is laced with landmines, even...

Russia says thwarted Moscow terror attack planned by 12

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Russian security officials released new details Tuesday about a group suspected of planning a terror attack in Moscow with support from the Islamic State group, saying it was comprised of 12 Russian citizens, including at least one who had been trained in Syria.















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VIDEO: Tracking wolves in the French Alps

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Claire Marshall attempts to track wolves in the French Alps with expert tracker Troy Bennett.

There have been 1,001 mass shootings in America since 2013

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It’s difficult to tell, exactly, which gunman pushed America past a milestone of violence in the early hours of Saturday morning this past weekend. Was it the unknown man who opened fire at a house party in Charlotte, injuring four? Or the home invader in Peoria, Ill., who shot a 14-year-old student athlete dead and wounded three other teens?

Ukraine calls for criminal investigation after report finds Russian missile ... - Fox News

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Fox News

Ukraine calls for criminal investigation after report finds Russian missile ...
Fox News
Ukraine is calling for a criminal investigation following a Dutch report identifying a Russian-made Buk missile as the cause of last year's Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crash, the Ukrainian Foreign Minister said in a United Nations press conference Tuesday.
Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 Most Likely Hit by Russian-Made Missile, Inquiry SaysNew York Times
Russian State Arms Maker Preempts Dutch Report Into Downing of Flight MH17Wall Street Journal
Dutch report: Buk missile downed MH17 in UkraineWashington Post
NBCNews.com -Sky News -Chicago Tribune
all 1,607 news articles »

Moscow’s Airstrikes in Syria Accompanied by Widespread Counter-Terrorist Operations inside Russia

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Paul Goble

            Staunton, October 13 – While the world is focusing on Russia’s airstrikes in Syria, actions the Kremlin is justifying to its domestic audience by saying it must hit the terrorists abroad before they can attack inside Russia, Russian security forces are simultaneously conducting counter-terrorist actions across many regions of the country. 

            The preemptive arrests in Moscow naturally attracted a great deal of attention, but Russian siloviki have launched counter-terrorist operations across the North Caucasus as well in Chechnya, Daghestan, and Ingushetia. There have been casualties both among the siloviki and among the militants (kavpolit.com/articles/dejstvovat_na_operezhenie-20593/).

            According to Magomed Edilsultanov of “Kavkazskaya politika,” “part of society is already drawing links between the decision of Russia to participate in the Syrian conflict and the intensification of terrorist activities in the regions and the capital,” even though “the authorities are certain that Russia’s special services are ready to counter the terrorist threat.”

            Such linkage means both that ISIS militants and other terrorists may have an even greater incentive to launch attacks inside Russia in the near future and that the Russian siloviki will undoubtedly invoke that threat as justification for an even tougher crackdown than the ones they have launched in the past.

            Putin’s recent words that Russians are “accustomed to the manifestation of evil” both inside Russia and abroad and the Kremlin leader’s suggestion that unless one is ready to use force against terrorists and militants, they will inevitably continue to strike” have been much quoted in recent days, the journalist suggests.

           

Headlines: Intervention in Syria: Russia Gambles Big Time | Rocket Attack Hits Russian Embassy in Syria

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